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Push Pull for out of phase


weldaar

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I want to install a push pull for out of phase. I will install in in place of the neck volume pot. Can someone help me with this wiring? I see a lot of lugs and am not sure which to use.

I've attached a pic of the switch.

 

Thanx,

 

Jeff

 

http://smg.photobuck...6632_1.jpg.html

 

 

 

Here's a diagram from the net that should do the trick.

 

 

http://www.deaf-eddie.net/drawings/phase-reverse.jpg

 

 

Johnny

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Here's a diagram from the net that should do the trick.

 

 

http://www.deaf-eddi...ase-reverse.jpg

 

 

Johnny

 

I see that that use the push pull switch on the tone, not the volume. Also the black wire from the pup is separated from the bare wire. am I correct in seeing that?

Could this be wired on the neck volume pot as well? Thank you for the diagram.

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Guest Farnsbarns

I see that that use the push pull switch on the tone, not the volume. Also the black wire from the pup is separated from the bare wire. am I correct in seeing that?

Could this be wired on the neck volume pot as well? Thank you for the diagram.

 

 

You must think of the new pot as 2 separate components. A pot, and a switch.

 

You can replace any pot with what you have.

 

The switch will simply reverse the polarity of one of your pup's.

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I see that that use the push pull switch on the tone, not the volume. Also the black wire from the pup is separated from the bare wire. am I correct in seeing that?

Could this be wired on the neck volume pot as well? Thank you for the diagram.

 

My Les Paul Studio Deluxe has (3) push pull pots from the factory. Both volumes change each pickup to single coils. One of the tones is a 10db boost. Do what makes sense to you...........

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FWIW, when I attempt to even start to perform an electrical modification to a guitar, I will draw the schematic of the raw parts. If you are not familiar with classical schematics that illustrate potentiometers and the pickup coils, switches, etc., then this probably is not something you would be able to perform easily. Nonetheless, it is the most assured way to go into extracting all electrical components and wiring from a guitar prior to modification. It is basically going into the deal with a solid, resolute plan.

 

All in all, I am an electrical engineer, and I have a lot of experience soldering and handling of many different passive components (the pot(s) and capacitor(s)). You do not need to be an electrical engineer to understand basic electrical schematics and how basic electrical components function, but if you are an engineer like me, you most assuredly better be strong with these types of tasks... If you are not comfortable with a soldering iron or do not understand why you are making a particular connection in your guitar's circuitry scheme, then I would suggest having an experienced individual perform the necessary mods as you most likely will make a mistake or have some sort of issue. Those inexperienced with an iron tend to burn wires and do a sloppy job on points of contact with the iron. As well, I use high quality "electronics-type" solder that when it fuses as it cools has a nice shiny luster to it - not some dull nasty looking blob! So overall, draw a schematic prior to gutting ANYTHING! - have a plan. Make sure your tools are of good quality and use quality solder. I personally prefer very thin solder as the more dense core solder strands can get messy if again, not experienced how to flow solder in the correct manner when being applied.

I have wired quite a few guitars, but never wired a push pull. I am a retired welder so i am familiar with soldering and such. I do have several guitar wiring diagrams.

 

 

 

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Excellent! I hope that everything turns out well for you. The best way to understand a Push-Pull switch incorporated on a pot - as typically in a guitar - is to take a multi-meter on the leads and see where the shorts are when you toggle the switch. This will help you explain what connects in which position of the switch. As well, online will be able to present much information on this component that could illustrate the physical connections as well. But as Farnsbarns said, it is really a potentiometer with an additional switch component. The switch should be a DPDT as well - 2 commons usually in the middle of the "pins" - and the connections to the commons which are the remaining 4 "pins". When you change the position, both commons switch - something to keep in mind. Yes you get 2*2 connections (4), but in reality, the switch only allows 2 different configurations to be realized, hence the DT element of the acronym.

 

Thank you for this info. I will put it to good use.

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Forgot to mention the details on the switch "multi-metering"... Try to do this with 0 connections made with the switch. As well, not installed in guitar so you can easily access the "pins" of the switch. Sometimes when you start to introduce elements into a circuit, it can tend to provide passive electrical characteristics that are not there when the switch is 100% disconnected. The goal is to understand the internal mechanisms of the DPDT switch. Once you understand the switching logic, you should have no issues making design decisions to wiring up your instrument.

 

OK, Thank you.

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