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For fans of His Bobness


Salfromchatham

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So that’s where our BBG got his forum name; I thought it was a moniker that stuck around after someone, maybe OneWilyFool, had posted a blues name generator that we were having fun with.

 

A good mini read, the Guardian article, and a good quote that should apply to many: “The studio albums are only there for the copyright.” A fave of mine are some alternate versions of Tangled ___.

 

At the end of the article: “I don’t need to know the poet. All I need is the poetry.” . . . Also wondering if there’s a parallel with those of us who are into something so much (say, a type of guitar, for example), that we want to dissect it, and need to remember not to get lost in the trivia, and to go and make, maybe record, and share some music.

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Myth has it that when hearing Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 50 years ago, Bob Dylan said - "Take it off", , , after 2 minutes.

Must admit I was close to do the same thing with this article. It came across too intellectual to swing, , , and rhyme with the beatnik.

 

Admit never and still not seeing Dylan as an intellectual. Maybe in an isolated rock-context, but otherwise no.

The artist is much too free for that, , , and too full-blooded rocking by the way. ..

Yes, he has different wires intuitively plugged into some kind of intellectualism, but it's a flux-connection and his work benefits from exactly that. Thank heavens.

 

Conservative ? First of all Bob is a romantic - and living in the spheres romance is bound to grow certain conservative flowers, , , and revolutionary ones too. Especially if you are a poet. And that's precisely what we have seen. Look closer inside the universe - it's driven by a classic 'poets view' on the world and on life. Even when topics are hard, harsh, brokenhearted, socially or politically focused.

 

Genius ? I think he is, ,, or was as a young man. However this is not detected in his re-use of or quoting all the big traditions and ink-sprinklers before him, , , but in the way he did it, , , meaning that the real primal power was his own basic source and how this stuff managed to access all the info around and inside of him - then glue, refine and re-mix, , , finally present it. B.D. was from a very early age a master of the melting-pot - a folk-beat-rock-cook - and the soups he conjured were ingenious. (a lot fell down in it)

 

No, his influence on modern music, art and culture cannot be overestimated and mustn't be forgotten - so sing the songs and speak to the youngsters in the supermarket about him, I do.

Now back to Brand New Leopard-skin Pill-box Hat. . .

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Myth has it that when hearing Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band 50 years ago, Bob Dylan said - "Take it off", , , after 2 minutes.

Must admit I was close to do the same thing with this article. It came across too intellectual to swing, , , and rhyme with the beatnik.

 

Admit never and still not seeing Dylan as an intellectual. Maybe in an isolated rock-context, but otherwise no.

The artist is much too free for that, , , and too full-blooded rocking by the way. ..

Yes, he has different wires intuitively plugged into some kind of intellectualism, but it's a flux-connection and his work benefits from exactly that. Thank heavens.

 

Conservative ? First of all Bob is a romantic - and living in the spheres romance is bound to grow certain conservative flowers, , , and revolutionary ones too. Especially if you are a poet. And that's precisely what we have seen. Look closer inside the universe - it's driven by a classic 'poets view' on the world and on life. Even when topics are hard, harsh, brokenhearted, socially or politically focused.

 

Genius ? I think he is, ,, or was as a young man. However this is not detected in his re-use of or quoting all the big traditions and ink-sprinklers before him, , , but in the way he did it, , , meaning that the real primal power was his own basic source and how this stuff managed to access all the info around and inside of him - then glue, refine and re-mix, , , finally present it. B.D. was from a very early age a master of the melting-pot - a folk-beat-rock-cook - and the soup he conjured was ingenious. (a lot fell down in it)

 

No, his influence on modern music, art and culture cannot be overestimated and mustn't be forgotten - so sing the songs and speak to the youngsters in the supermarket about him, I do.

Now back to Brand New Leopard-skin Pill-box Hat. . .

 

This is a very astute post by Mr 7.I love the way you write!

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Conservative? Probably. Proud to show his religion, for sure.

 

I'll say this, he's damn sure a capitalist. Have you seen the prices for his t-shirts and crap at his shows. I paid $ 25.00 for a poster. Then another hundred for a custom frame with the tickets inside.

 

I never really took him as being a Life Changing Genius, just a guy with a guitar and some insight. An old drunk in a bar will have moments of brilliance from time to time.

 

Some people simply take this crap too serious.

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This is a very astute post by Mr 7.

 

When Em weighs in, I read more than once, always.

Thx, sirs. . .

Some people simply take this crap too serious.

Only trying to fuel Sal's post - to me a highly intriguing topic. Surely don't hope it had the opposite effect.

But Murph, , would you say the same about the people who discussed the first skyscrapers on Manhattan. . ?

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But Murph, , would you say the same about the people who discussed the first skyscrapers on Manhattan. . ?[/size][/font]

 

I was commenting on the writer of the article.

 

To ME, Bob is a guy with a guitar, now a piano, and some opinions, and some insight yet still.

 

A great writer at times, like many other musicians/writers I have known. Because he was slick enough to keep a label, we end up with a huge library of stuff to hear. I just thought the writer (of the article.....) was taking some things for granted that aren't really there.

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I’m too long in the tooth to be putting anyone on a pedestal.

 

I tried to read James Joyce Ulysses once ,because , hey it’s a classic , and I’ve tried my best to read as much as I can ...didn’t get very far into it for me to realise that it wasn’t for me

 

But I don’t poo poo the thoughts that it’s a genius piece of literature

 

Don’t get me stared on jane Austen

 

 

Dylan isn’t your average man with a guitar or a piano

He just isn’t

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Any time people start discussing Dylan, the ideas and perspectives start coming from (and heading toward) a wide variety of origins and destinations. To me, the most striking thing about the phenomenon is that it began with his first album (yeah, we even talked about that one!) and hasn't stopped since then. I consider that unusual, fascinating, and a strong indication that there's more to the man than we'll ever be able to sort and classify - that must be frustrating to people who aren't comfortable without a nice set of labels for most everything!

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What really made me think twice was that Dylan seemed to lack general intellectual overview in his autobiography. He did recall, not reflect.

Same whenever he comments on his own status as both a revolutionary of the early 60's and the well-known spokesman of his generation.

1 thing is that he might disagree and for some reason wants to disclaim these roles - another is that he should be able to see why they emerged.

 

A good deal of the first songs, his whole public persona - also after he plugged in and went beatnik instead of folkie - just incarnated the hip mindset of the times.

So did the way he treated the language and the topics'n'views of the music - his entire artistic angle.

Besides he was among the first that made the contra-contra-turn towards a reunion with the roots, which later - as the reaction to the outgoin' exploration of new frontiers and psychedelia - became a trend here in Europe also.

This journey from the folk-scene through electrification back to basics and even into the self-delivery of Planet Waves and Blood on The Tracks, made him the relevant front-runner he was. And the circle was completed by the re-protests of Hurricane on the 1975 Desire LP. A down-right hit no one saw comin'. Over a period of 14 years his legend was born, developed and carved, not in cement, but in the bark of a still growing tree. Close to every album from then is invaluable.

 

If there is a deeper Dylan - the father, husband, house-host, the rational thinker, the career-maker, the money-counter, the politician, the jew - a human mind'n'soul standing further behind the serious guy presented once in a while, fx in 60 Minutes, , , well, we haven't seen him yet. Who knows, , , he could exist in there somewhere and though he may live as far away from the tambourine man as possible, this fellow should be welcome out for a chime. The hour is gettin' late, but not too late and it wouldn't spoil the catalog for me.

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Seems like these posts are missing the cultural affect of Dylan. Dylan, for starters, redefined how we hear voices of singer-songwriters. Prior to Dylan, the public generally expected a singer or singer-songwriter to have a certain kind of proper voice. When Dylan first appeared in the public scene, his voice was like no other we had heard, as was his phrasing. Over time, we grew used to it and that opened the door for a zillion other singer songwriters to get listened to, as not having a proper singing voice became totally acceptable. True, it ticked off a lot of singers or singer-songwriters who had proper voices...and still does to this day. But, Dylan culturally opened up the door for singers and singer-songwriters with authentic, and not proper voices, to get seriously listened to. Of course, the irony is that now Dylan’s early and mid 60s voice sounds pretty darn good compared to his well worn voice of now, and again, takes some listening to, to get used to.

 

Additionally, Dylan redefined singer-songwriting from its Tin Pan Alley approach, to become a literary and image based approach. This was often misunderstood to be a message approach, but, time has shown it really focuses on conveying literary images although there may or not also be political, life snapshot, Americana, absurdity etc messages in those images. Of course, the irony is Dylan lately had been singing Tin Pan Alley songs out of appreciation for their own art. The art he almost killed off.

 

The other thing is Dylan has always managed to do things that keep his charisma and mystery thought provoking. That is an art in itself.

 

Just my two cents to this discussion.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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Seems like these posts are missing the cultural affect of Dylan. Dylan, for starters, redefined how we hear voices of singer-songwriters.

The line above has a good point - and it's still a mystery how Bob could sound like a 200 year old rover when he was barely 20.

Apart from that, I've seen several exhibitions of Dylan's handmade oil-art and believe they only confirmed his way of doin' things.

An intuitive approach goin' for atmosphere, texture and soul - not polluted/supported by intellectualism at all.

Have to say the canvases were up and down, but it was interesting to stand in the same space as him in front of them - gave some sort of insight to the artistic senses behind it all.

The one below from the Brazil Series however, reached out to me. And take a look.

Isn't this young flower-seller a version of B.D. himself had it not been for Blowing in The Wind, A. Grossman, J.H. Hammond and Columbia.

No professor had become of him without luck in music, , , a street-spirit instead, a dealer of romance. .

 

2009/10 - Ranchers ~ bzVgkqF.jpg

 

 

 

 

P.S. the frame is not a part of the work

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Thought about this many times and had my line ready. But that was as a younger man loooong ago and now it's forgotten.

If the chance should come by today I would draw from the hip :

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-minor or magenta, , , brandy or tea, , cream. . ?

 

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I thought I once found myself standing a few steps across from Bob Dylan, in a poor disguise, while in a Disneyland gift store, once. (Bob in a disguise, not me.) I whispered to my wife, “that may be Bob Dylan standing across from me” and she agreed. I know he heard me. But, then I said nothing to him. And, he just stood there and I just stood there. After about five minutes of standing there, this fellow walked away and then when I looked to see where he went, I saw him standing, waiting at the doorway and when he saw I saw him, he nodded and walked out the door.

 

Was it him or not? I will never know. Sure looked like him in some kind of poor disguise.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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