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The “favourite songwriting guitar” thread...


Jinder

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Hi all,

I’ve been meaning to start this thread for ages. Everyone has their favourite guitar for a certain style of playing or style of music, but for the writers among us, which is the one that gets your creativity moving?

 

For me it’s my 1990 Hummingbird. I’ve written with all my guitars, but this one is just full of songs. Every time I pick it up at home i write something, I’ve never had so many songs in such a short time from any guitar...it just fits under my arm and the tone makes me sing..

 

It makes me write in the way I used to a long while back-just playing, finding some great changes and making up melodies and babble over the top, before refining the babble into proper lyrics and shaping the song structure. For many years I abandoned that approach and wrote the words first, before alloying them to music, but the Bird is just such a joy to play that I can’t resist!

 

My Dove and SJ200 are lovely writing instruments too, but the Bird is the king of the jungle.

 

What’s yours?

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Hi all,

I’ve been meaning to start this thread for ages. Everyone has their favourite guitar for a certain style of playing or style of music, but for the writers among us, which is the one that gets your creativity moving?

 

For me it’s my 1990 Hummingbird. I’ve written with all my guitars, but this one is just full of songs. Every time I pick it up at home i write something, I’ve never had so many songs in such a short time from any guitar...it just fits under my arm and the tone makes me sing..

 

It makes me write in the way I used to a long while back-just playing, finding some great changes and making up melodies and babble over the top, before refining the babble into proper lyrics and shaping the song structure. For many years I abandoned that approach and wrote the words first, before alloying them to music, but the Bird is just such a joy to play that I can’t resist!

 

My Dove and SJ200 are lovely writing instruments too, but the Bird is the king of the jungle.

 

What’s yours?

 

My J45 seems to write its own songs ...just throw the mind into neutral and music comes out.

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I usually have just one of my three go-to guitars out on the stand so I can pick it up almost anytime (I work out of a home office) and see what's what.

 

Lucky for me, I've found tunes in all three. I can't put my finger on why one guitar (and not the other two) make it to the stand, however. For most of the summer, the maple J100 was always on hand, then came the li'l Kalamazoo upstart for a couple of months, but presently, it is the J45 within reach.

 

It sure does sound pretty, here in the days of waning light. Whatever comes out, if anything, is likely to be mournful...but then, we all might expect as much from me.

 

Exciting news (speaking of songwriting and guitar choices): I've signed up for a small songwriting workshop in Nashville, at end of January, guest-hosted by Mary Gauthier. I'm really looking forward to that, and all three of my gits are clamoring to be picked for the trip. Decisions, decisions...

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I consider myself an arranger rather than a writer. I never seem to play much of anything as it was originally written. If you want a blues version of Wipe Out or a Cajun version of Wooly Bully I am there. I once arranged Paint it Black where the chorus was played as a waltz and a with a kazoo sitting in for the sitar. But for me the guitar is immaterial. I get an idea stuck in my head and I will grab whatever is nearest to me.

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.....songwriting workshop in Nashville, at end of January, guest-hosted by Mary Gauthier.

 

Bonus points for members that know the correct pronunciation of Mary's last name.......! [flapper]

 

For me the guitar doesn't matter......it's all about having the time to just wander about with changes, hopefully moving toward something useable. Sometimes there's a phrase in mind, other times it's the tempo of the changes that point a direction for meter and melody. Don't think I've ever taken a completed lyric to the guitar in search of..........

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This is a timely topic. Ive found that Ive struggled to write songs, mainly because my vocals were strong enough in order to put toether melodies and have a workable, dynamic range. But I can pull off a tune these days vocally, so im getting back into it.

 

ive wondered how writers approach the process. Do they start ith lyrics, a progression, a riff, vocal melody, or just a 'mood' ?

 

Interesting how Jinder went from lyrics first back to guitar. im sort of not sure where to begin, right now a progression comes more naturally, but then i struggle to create a compelling melody over the progression, and lyrics, thats a totally different kettle of fish.

 

Suffice to say, its quite a tricky them for me, but having said that I can feel that ive got many songs inside me aching to be released. I think it just need to knock over a couple, relatively simple ones and that will get the ball rolling.

 

I recently bougth this book, will study it over the coming weeks and Xmas.

 

https://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Songs-Guitar-Expanded/dp/0879309423/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1511366402&sr=8-1&keywords=how+to+write+songs+on+guitar

 

In terms of which guitar seems to inspire me the most to write, i would say the Dove, as it has such a dynamic, rich yet clean tone.

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You all reckon Dylan just bought the right guitar ?

Randy Newman bought the right piano ?

 

Neil found would’ve been working in a warehouse had he not been given the right guitar ?

 

 

Good grief people

 

Tell ya what ... if a song doesn’t fall out of a guitar after a while playing why don’t you go down and catch fairies in the garden ?

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You all reckon Dylan just bought the right guitar ?

Randy Newman bought the right piano ?

 

Neil found would’ve been working in a warehouse had he not been given the right guitar ?

 

 

Good grief people

 

Tell ya what ... if a song doesn’t fall out of a guitar after a while playing why don’t you go down and catch fairies in the garden ?

 

Oooh, the blind boy has a severe case of the grunts ! [cool]

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The romantic side of me likes the notion of special guitars "full of songs" but the reality for me is any old guitar that stays in tune is ok for writing.It's hard work (for me)to get a song written so I suppose playing on a nice guitar like a J-45 helps a little in that the more enjoyable "sound" is around during the writing process.

Once a melody is established I often write / rework lyrics in my head while walking to work.

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I usually have just one of my three go-to guitars out on the stand so I can pick it up almost anytime (I work out of a home office) and see what's what.

 

Lucky for me, I've found tunes in all three. I can't put my finger on why one guitar (and not the other two) make it to the stand, however. For most of the summer, the maple J100 was always on hand, then came the li'l Kalamazoo upstart for a couple of months, but presently, it is the J45 within reach.

 

It sure does sound pretty, here in the days of waning light. Whatever comes out, if anything, is likely to be mournful...but then, we all might expect as much from me.

 

Exciting news (speaking of songwriting and guitar choices): I've signed up for a small songwriting workshop in Nashville, at end of January, guest-hosted by Mary Gauthier. I'm really looking forward to that, and all three of my gits are clamoring to be picked for the trip. Decisions, decisions...

 

The LG-1 gets my vote. Anne are you a member of NSAI?

Michael

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When writing the guitar isn't that important to me. Rather than an acoustic instrument it becomes a tool.

What matters is the nut-width and action, which both must be no-issue and just work as smooth as possible.

 

Yet I get the theard-Q.

Certain guitars call for certain directions and if I was chasing, let's say a rag-time inspired idea, it probably wouldn't take place behind a big dread.

The 12-fret is more in line with that etc.

I'm certain everyone gets the 'logic', , , as persons, things, phenomenons, themes, situations and songs tend to have deeper nature, which calls for, if not vertical respect, then attention or awareness (also so you once in a while can experiment with goin' contra or challenging them).

 

But sure, , , I can see my arms reach for Dove with the brain goin' :

What do we have under the hood together right now, , , something different ??

And that would be fine.

All in all there are no rules or guidelines carved in concrete when it comes to writing -

a highly primal process that have you starting out as a raving caveman and ending up like a professor. Interesting ?

Heq yes, , , that's why I must have done over 1000 in my time. An early bold starter here.

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