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Seventies-Fan

1967 Gibson Southern Jumbo

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My SJ is a 1964 and the adj bridge was swapped out sometime prior to 1984 for a regular one. I made a bone saddle for it around 1986 and it's not moved. I have Nickel Bronze mediums on it that are at least a year old. That guitar will never again have 80/20 or PB...never. I won't make that statement about any other guitar, but that one...case closed. I would try Monel though.

 

There is a strange phenomenon about that guitar. If I were to do a direct comparison to either of my J200s or Martins, it would seem lifeless and weak. And by comparison, that's probably true. However if you sit down with that guitar on the couch and play it solo, you'd swear it was the only guitar on the planet. It has a complex richness that doesn't come out in the standard, predictable way, where we look for volume, scooped mids, sparkle this and sparkle that. The SJ has no sparkle but it will hold your hand and make you thank God you decided to take up guitar. I have louder, brassier girls in the herd but none makes me want to play like that guitar can.

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The Southern Jumbo - as the Country Western - changed in 1962 when it became hip to be square.

You should snap a photo of your old man's SJ and set it up in this thread.

Plastic saddle ?

Next time I go for a visit I'll get a couple of pics. I'm not sure about the saddle, I will check it out. My dad had a couple of pins put in to keep the bridge down. It probably needs a neck reset, but we both have "better" Gibsons around to put the money into fixing it. It still gets played a little bit but what makes it cool is it was my grandfathers.

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My SJ is a 1964 and the adj bridge was swapped out sometime prior to 1984 for a regular one. I made a bone saddle for it around 1986 and it's not moved. I have Nickel Bronze mediums on it that are at least a year old. That guitar will never again have 80/20 or PB...never. I won't make that statement about any other guitar, but that one...case closed. I would try Monel though.

 

There is a strange phenomenon about that guitar. If I were to do a direct comparison to either of my J200s or Martins, it would seem lifeless and weak. And by comparison, that's probably true. However if you sit down with that guitar on the couch and play it solo, you'd swear it was the only guitar on the planet. It has a complex richness that doesn't come out in the standard, predictable way, where we look for volume, scooped mids, sparkle this and sparkle that. The SJ has no sparkle but it will hold your hand and make you thank God you decided to take up guitar. I have louder, brassier girls in the herd but none makes me want to play like that guitar can.

 

 

I was happy to read your description of the "strange phenomenon", pretty much described a feeling I've been having with the 1967 SJ I just acquired. I have a variety of guitars that all sound good and play well, but as you said, when you sit with this one and listen to it, there is a complex richness! I mostly play fingerstyle and so this one with the rosewood bridge is pretty mellow until you dig in. It's very articulate sounding, chords easily and I'm really enjoying it!

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Looks entirely possible that 67 was a year for 4 piece tops:

 

 

If I may say so this J 45 sounded stellar to my ears!

 

Could be they found their way that year, but not as a rule. Let's keep our eyes open regarding those 67 tops.

 

 

1970 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOIo4lEpsPY

 

And sure, the good looking red 'second' sounds okay - still nothing outstanding if you ask me.

But the first part of the test provides an interesting opportunity to A/B with another slightly older slope.

There one hear how Taylor's also adjustable rosewood saddled third-fret-capoed 1964/65 J-50 really has it.

Not only a lower actioned, but also much looser 'n' soul-full guitar, , , on which he by the way had the bridge fixed - for then never to play it again.

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Could be they found their way that year, but not as a rule. Let's keep our eyes open regarding those 67 tops.

 

 

1970 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOIo4lEpsPY

 

And sure, the good looking red 'second' sounds okay - still nothing outstanding if you ask me.

But the first part of the test provides an interesting opportunity to A/B with another slightly older slope.

There one hear how Taylor's also adjustable rosewood saddled third-fret-capoed 1964/65 J-50 really has it.

Not only a lower actioned, but also much looser 'n' soul-full guitar, , , on which he by the way had the bridge fixed - for then never to play it again.

Em7,

 

I meant as in "a few 4 pc tops may have trickled out of the big K in 67"

 

 

James is an a musical icon of my childhood.

I will never be as gifted in picking as he is ... But will always enjoy his sweet voice.

 

 

 

JC

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Em7,

I meant as in "a few 4 pc tops may have trickled out of the big K in 67"

 

James is an a musical icon of my childhood.

I will never be as gifted in picking as he is ... But will always enjoy his sweet voice.

Yes, perhaps ^

Okay - can't say the same as he was too sweet and edgeless for the young version of me.

Much of his records still are, but I've been lucky to hear him live a couple of time. Nothing short of magnificent.

But how do you regard my thoughts 'bout his original wooden sound and the difference compared to the red roller ?

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Looks entirely possible that 67 was a year for 4 piece tops:

 

 

If I may say so this J 45 sounded stellar to my ears!

 

 

 

JC

 

 

Hi JC,

Hey thanks for sharing that video, I enjoyed it! This is the reason I was excited about joining this forum... I'm late to the game with these old Gibson's but am learning as I go. I've now seen several of these 4 pc tops from 67. I don't know if anyone considers a 4 pc top a bad thing, but I guess perhaps it just makes it a bit more unique...

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Could be they found their way that year, but not as a rule. Let's keep our eyes open regarding those 67 tops.

 

 

1970 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOIo4lEpsPY

 

And sure, the good looking red 'second' sounds okay - still nothing outstanding if you ask me.

But the first part of the test provides an interesting opportunity to A/B with another slightly older slope.

There one hear how Taylor's also adjustable rosewood saddled third-fret-capoed 1964/65 J-50 really has it.

Not only a lower actioned, but also much looser 'n' soul-full guitar, , , on which he by the way had the bridge fixed - for then never to play it again.

 

 

Hi Em, yes as you described, that guitar sounds great... I've barely had ANY time to spend with mine yet, but I am beginning to like the rosewood saddle, (at least as much as I can discern at this point) compared to other materials. Pretty mellow for fingerstyle, but definitely comes alive with a pick.

 

James Taylor... so much great music!

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I know this is an old thread. However, I just bought a 1967 Gibson SJ from Rivington Guitars. The reason I bought it is because I used to have a 67 Gibson SJN/CW that I stupidly sold. And I am hoping to get another SJ/SJN as good. The 67 SJN  was one of the best sounding acoustics I have ever had.  I am commenting because my 67 SJN also had a 4 piece top. Mine was also marked with a "2",  a second. I could find  no flaw. It was in great condition.  I have never seen another Gibson guitar with a 4 piece top and was interested to hear about yours.

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16 hours ago, Winterfell1 said:

I know this is an old thread. However, I just bought a 1967 Gibson SJ from Rivington Guitars. The reason I bought it is because I used to have a 67 Gibson SJN/CW that I stupidly sold. And I am hoping to get another SJ/SJN as good. The 67 SJN  was one of the best sounding acoustics I have ever had.  I am commenting because my 67 SJN also had a 4 piece top. Mine was also marked with a "2",  a second. I could find  no flaw. It was in great condition.  I have never seen another Gibson guitar with a 4 piece top and was interested to hear about yours.

Are you able to upload a picture of the SJ? 

Im not sure if the  4 piece top would quailfy as a 2nd.  It could though.  Or it just could of been a flaw in the finish at the time.  
 

 Ive owned may 66 , 67 SJ Gibsons and still have a 67. They all have Had a two piece top. 

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16 hours ago, Winterfell1 said:

I know this is an old thread. However, I just bought a 1967 Gibson SJ from Rivington Guitars. The reason I bought it is because I used to have a 67 Gibson SJN/CW that I stupidly sold. And I am hoping to get another SJ/SJN as good. The 67 SJN  was one of the best sounding acoustics I have ever had.  I am commenting because my 67 SJN also had a 4 piece top. Mine was also marked with a "2",  a second. I could find  no flaw. It was in great condition.  I have never seen another Gibson guitar with a 4 piece top and was interested to hear about yours.

 

No problem with reviving a Back from The Dead thread if you have something new to say.  I would think though a NGD is worthy of a new thread.

Anyway, the only SJ I have ever owned was a 1956 .  Letting it go remains one of the dumbest *** moves I have ever made but back in the day the only way I could acquire something different was to offer up something in trade.

To my way of thinking,  1967 was the last year you could count on getting a  really good sounding Gibson.  Beginning the next year the powers that be at CMI started becoming  obsessed with warranty issues resulting in increasingly heavier bracing.  Great for survival but not the best thing for sound.    What makes or breaks  SJs such as yours is whether you can peacefully co-exist with the skimpy neck carve and narrow nut.  I can't.  But that is just a preference and not a good or bad thing.

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17 minutes ago, zombywoof said:

 

No problem with reviving a Back from The Dead thread if you have something new to say.  I would think though a NGD is worthy of a new thread.

Anyway, the only SJ I have ever owned was a 1956 .  Letting it go remains one of the dumbest *** moves I have ever made but back in the day the only way I could acquire something different was to offer up something in trade.

To my way of thinking,  1967 was the last year you could count on getting a  really good sounding Gibson.  Beginning the next year the powers that be at CMI started becoming  obsessed with warranty issues resulting in increasingly heavier bracing.  Great for survival but not the best thing for sound.    What makes or breaks  SJs such as yours is whether you can peacefully co-exist with the skimpy neck carve and narrow nut.  I can't.  But that is just a preference and not a good or bad thing.


ya. That skimpy neck.  Mine has that.  Its just like playing my 68 Strats. The neck feels the same.     That had me thinking if thats why Gibson went that direction.   When I play both totally different guitars they have that same Neck feel. 
 

I know once you play one of those. Its hard getting the fingers to adjust to the wider Nut guitars. 

Edited by slimt

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Hi Winterfell1,   

Congratulations on the 67 SJ!!!  I started this thread about my 67 SJ some time ago.  I 've become used to the thin neck width and don't have any bad feelings about it.  Does yours have the rosewood saddle or ceramic?  Mine has the rosewood and I like it a lot.  Maybe one day I might look for a ceramic just to see how it sounds.

My guitar has the 4 pc top, but didn't have a "2" impressed in the back of the headstock,  so I don't think the two conditions are related.  All in all I love mine.  Every time I pick it up, it makes me happy 🙂 It has a very balanced woody tone to it,  very sweet sounding,  perhaps a bit quiet, but I mainly play fingerstyle.  

I have another more recent post called "Sitting on the porch swing"  and I added a fairly recent pic there if you want to look at it.  This is the only acoustic Gibson I've ever owned, and so I have nothing else to personally compare it to,  but I think it sounds fantastic, and I have the action quite low and so it's super easy to play!

I hope you enjoy your new guitar!

-Keith

 

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