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So, is rosewood really getting that hard to get?


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Sorry if this isn't allowed, but I am very curious. So, I was just checking Ibanez's new stuff for this year and it looks like a lot of their models have rosewood substitutes for fretboards/fingerboards. There are some with rosewood, ebony, and maple, but a lot of it is wood like jatoba, panga panga, pine, cultered maple, ovangkol, pau ferro, purple heart, and laurel. I know the deal with Brazilian rosewood, but are other species of rosewood getting harder to get?

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It's now controlled under cites so it's very difficult to cross borders with it. You'll see the end of rosewood on guitars in the next few years.

 

I knew that with Brazilian rosewood. You have to have documentation n all for that, but I didn't think it would turn into to that with other species of rosewood. Seems like I remember hearing that Fender switched to Pau Ferro boards on their Mexican made modes sometime ago.

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Yes its not that its any harder to get.. Its just a pain in the butt to get certification for each one and much easier just not too use it..

 

It happened cos no one at CITES had thought about guitars or instruments or what a pain its going to be. I mean some cheap £50 acoustic is likely to have a rosewood board, the certificate costs about £60... I did hear that there are a few music industry organisations trying to get musical instruments off the list.. But as it is you only really need worry if you are either buying or selling internationally OR taking your instrument for the purpose of work in which case you need a certificate. Carrying a guitar for personal use is allowed (up to 11 lbs worth I think).

 

From what I know theres loads of Indian Rosewood and they have been harvesting and planting sustainably for quite a while now. These new rules apparently were due to the large amount of poached wood coming out of Asia.. For which I actually agree something needed to be done but they just went a bit over board.. I think the reasoning is that its almost impossible to tell what wood you are actually looking at on a finished product. Hows some shmoe customs officer meant to know when even and expert can often find it difficult to tell.. So they just decided to stick every species on the list instead.

Edited by Rabs
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I don't know how it is for wood, but here in the bourbon industry, we have to account for everything. We're highly regulated by the US Government from the time we get the grain until the time it reaches our distributors. Something like that for rosewood would certainly drive the price up but it could be greater regulated. Or, is that what they're doing now? Soon we'll have people stripping guitars with rosewood fretboards to put on guitars without.

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Yeah. The Government confiscates ivory and when they have 3 or 4 tons, they burn it.

Like the poachers really give a shoot.

 

Yeah, I don't get the ivory burning thing. When they burn some of the product on the black market, doesn't the price and demand go up as a direct result of taking some stuff off the market? Some of these regulators aren't that logical. I get that they're trying to call attention to the problem, but...

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