Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Room Humidifier Recommentation Please...


jedzep
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey y'all. For those of you who are happy with using a small-med room humidifier, I'd love to hear your review especially on quietness of operation. Thanks!

 

Thought I heard a 'pop' come from the vicinity of my L0, but I don't think I want to look.

Edited by jedzep
Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://www.target.com/p/honeywell-designer-series-cool-mist-humidifier/-/A-14568205?ref=tgt_adv_XS000000&AFID=google_pla_df&CPNG=PLA_Home+Improvement+Shopping&adgroup=SC_Home+Improvement&LID=700000001170770pgs&network=g&device=c&location=9028092&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIwYfzgKyM2QIVw7jACh0J4w5vEAQYGSABEgLGa_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

 

Honeywell 'Designer' Room Humidifier. Cool Mist. 0.8 gallons. 'infinite' settings for amount of output. Very quiet.

I've used this winters for the past 4 years. Couldn't be happier with it. Can put on table in my 10x12 'music room'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here in dry, South Texas, I only need one when the heat stays on for over a day in the winter. We didn't need a humidifier when we lived in South Florida. But we needed a BIG de-humidifier in our basement in MA.

I guess the answer for Jedzep is a function of where he lives and what the normal RH% for the different seasons in the room he keeps his guitars without a humidifier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. Summer is AC'd, so it's only a winter thing, one room, but wood heat. Although the stove is on the other side of the house, it's a small home. I just need a quiet cool mist for 240 sq ft. guitar room.

Glad no one brought up my anti-humidify rants.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get something that uses replaceable pads. Though it's an added expense and work to change them each month, you will avoid the white powder you get from the other ones. If you can see the vapor coming out of the unit, you will have white powder on your guitars/gear.

 

Also nice if you can find a unit with a built in hygrometer and auto shut off. Keeps the guess work out.

 

Try to keep the room at 45% humidity.

Edited by Drog
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get something that uses replaceable pads. Though it's an added expense and work to change them each month, you will avoid the white powder you get from the other ones. If you can see the vapor coming out of the unit, you will have white powder on your guitars/gear.

 

Also nice if you can find a unit with a built in hygrometer and auto shut off. Keeps the guess work out.

 

Try to keep the room at 45% humidity.

 

 

To jump on Drog's suggestion of getting something with replaceable pads... I'd say at least that, or even look to a lesser expensive one and expect to buy a new one every year. We've got an old dry house with wood heat - need to humidify the crap out of in the winter. Never figured out a way to battle mold in those things, so just replace them now. I'm going to check out the suggestion above of getting something that works off a direct water feed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

I’ve got a humidifier on my furnace, but when we go for days topping out in the teens it can’t keep the humidity above 35. So I also have an AirCare unit and together they handle the load. In my area this winter has been tough with three extended stretches of temps in the teens or lower. Brrrrr........... .

 

.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A bowl of water on the radiator will help: but I think you'll see it evaporate more quickly, if it is a large flat, shallow metal baking pan.

The 1915 house we lived in in Central Massachusetts had steam heat radiators. Of course, the steam stays inside the massive cast iron radiators while the heat they 'radiate' dries out the air and all the wood in the house.

But in this house, each radiator had a thin perforated metal, decorative 'enclosure'. This three sided radiator cover came with a flip top that revealed a metal tray inside that sat on top of the radiator. Maybe an inch deep and basically the same size as the top of the radiator. We filled them with water every other day, but I have no idea how much humidity they put out. It was a big old house with tall ceilings. If I had to guess - I'd say it helped boost the humidity by 10%. Legal Disclaimer: the water gets hot, small children, dogs, mothers-in-law and pickup trucks could get burned if they have access to an unstable pan of water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To jump on Drog's suggestion of getting something with replaceable pads... I'd say at least that, or even look to a lesser expensive one and expect to buy a new one every year. We've got an old dry house with wood heat - need to humidify the crap out of in the winter. Never figured out a way to battle mold in those things, so just replace them now. I'm going to check out the suggestion above of getting something that works off a direct water feed.

To get rid of any chance of mold, when I change the pads (each month) I wash down the tray area and pad area with a solution of 3 parts water - one part bleach. Rinse it well when you are done. Never any issues with mold. Wear gloves and eye protection around bleach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...