Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

A rare elephant


E-minor7
 Share

Recommended Posts

Here's something a little different. One of Fahey's complicated and slightly alternative tunes. But listen to the guitar - and look at it.

A highly intriguing 1939 rosewood Larson Bros. with lots of soul and vibration. Big and curvy it is, but notice how the boom stays exactly on the right side of the line.

Plenty of bass yet generally clear and defined and with an action ideal for this kind of expression.

 

The film is over 8 minutes long and it's almost as if the guitar gets warmed up during the track. Eeehh, maybe it's the player's fingers.

A mister Andrew Lardner -

 

 

2013 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8ddfhWE2Gg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dylan used to play a Larson Bros. Prairie State jumbo. You want a Larson Bros. guitar these days you had better be prepared to dig deep into your pockets.

Indeed! Y'all probably know this, but Tony Klassen at ARK New Era Guitars does his take on the Prairie State Jumbo. Not cheap either, but less than vintage.

post-59278-059727300 1518727336_thumb.jpg

Edited by bayoubengal1954
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the work of the Larson brothers. Here's my collection:

 

FJ-Cover1.jpg

 

I often don't favor the sound of rosewood steel string guitars. But, I love the Larsons' rosewood guitars. The reasons, I believe, are due to 2 design traits: 1) the highly radiused tops and backs and 2) laminated braces (usually just the X braces, but on occasion, all braces) composed of spruce/rosewood/spruce. These two traits brighten the sound and increase sustain.

 

You can read my Fretboard Journal story about the Larsons and their instruments here.

 

To illustrate, here's my comparison of 2 000 size guitars: 1920 Larson Maurer 551 and 1929 Martin 000-28:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30Ee6vN9nIE

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wonderful tone and sustain in both of those guitars. The Larson Brothers guitar seems to have bit more projection and balance, with a powerful but warm (not boomy) bass.

 

That's a perfect tune and picking style to show off a rosewood OOO.

Thanks, Nick!

 

I think that my Zoom recorder reproduced the tones of the guitars pretty accurately. And, your comment about "projection and balance" reinforces that belief. What I've enjoyed about posting that comparison is that folks have clear, and differing, preferences. Some of us like projection and balance, others prefer the warmth of the Martin. I'm just happy that I prefer the tone of the guitar that costs a fourth or fifth of what the other costs! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To illustrate, here's my comparison of 2 000 size guitars: 1920 Larson Maurer 551 and 1929 Martin 000-28:

 

Thanx for dealing these 2 aces - sound good and I'm sure they are even better live. Quite difficult to rate one above the other.

Beginning to like the Larsons for more than their looks, , , and Triple-0's can be down-right fantastic.

 

Played 2 all-hog Marts from the 15 series today. Maaaan, they were good right from the shop-wall (would need to hear them without Lifespan strings).

Yet when I came home my April 2012 Bird with real old steel flew even higher.

Found out that if I had the room and doe, my # of acoustics would rise to 75, , , or let's calm it and say 66.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice find. There is so much guitar there. .

 

 

For sure. He has a Crooked Star line of the PS with less bling at a more affordable price.

FWIW there is a 2016 for sale at Lark Street for $2500.

 

 

https://www.gbase.com/gear/ark-new-era-guitars-tony-klassen-crooked-star-2016-

post-59278-017061900 1518802511_thumb.jpg

Edited by bayoubengal1954
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love the work of the Larson brothers. Here's my collection:

 

FJ-Cover1.jpg

 

I often don't favor the sound of rosewood steel string guitars. But, I love the Larsons' rosewood guitars. The reasons, I believe, are due to 2 design traits: 1) the highly radiused tops and backs and 2) laminated braces (usually just the X braces, but on occasion, all braces) composed of spruce/rosewood/spruce. These two traits brighten the sound and increase sustain.

 

You can read my Fretboard Journal story about the Larsons and their instruments here.

 

To illustrate, here's my comparison of 2 000 size guitars: 1920 Larson Maurer 551 and 1929 Martin 000-28:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30Ee6vN9nIE

Very cool, jt! The article was a great read as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...