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J-45 Weight ?


jon_bailey

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I was looking on-line for a J-45 with the view to buying. Ive noticed my favourite store has two in stock with one 4.4lbs and one at 4.7lbs. I guess this is down to the amount of nitrocellulose? Would it be better to go for the lighter one as the guitar with less paint would presumably breath better? Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

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The difference in weight would be because the guitars are made of wood and even planed down to the same thickness two pieces of wood won't weigh the same.

Guitars breath mostly from the inside which is raw wood so I don't think breathing would be an issue either.

Go play them both and take the one you like the best home.

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It's the sum of all the parts. Most J-45's, in my experience, weigh between 4 pounds and four pounds 8 ounces, give or take a few ounces. It's mostly differences between pieces of wood and hardware, not the amount of finish on the guitar. Wood density is not a fixed number: there are variances even between nominally-identical pieces of spruce and mahogany. Rotomatics weigh more than Waverlys.

 

You don't know which guitar will sound the best until you play it.

 

Having said that, given my druthers, I'd go for the lighter guitar rather than the heavier one.

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It's the sum of all the parts. Most J-45's, in my experience, weigh between 4 pounds and four pounds 8 ounces, give or take a few ounces. It's mostly differences between pieces of wood and hardware, not the amount of finish on the guitar. Wood density is not a fixed number: there are variances even between nominally-identical pieces of spruce and mahogany. Rotomatics weigh more than Waverlys.

 

You don't know which guitar will sound the best until you play it.

 

Having said that, given my druthers, I'd go for the lighter guitar rather than the heavier one.

 

I used to say that Nick... In fact I would respond to posts such as these, comparing weights on ...say... Sweetwater, and advise to go lighter. And then I bought this Hoss Hummingbird, which is heavier than Los Lobos... now I keep quiet.

 

One never know do one...

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I used to say that Nick... In fact I would respond to posts such as these, comparing weights on ...say... Sweetwater, and advise to go lighter. And then I bought this Hoss Hummingbird, which is heavier than Los Lobos... now I keep quiet.

 

One never know do one...

 

So, there you go. Pick the guitar, not the weight.

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I noticed you said "online". So no chance of playing beforehand? Weight has no bearing to me. If they are both close in looks and features, have your wife or girlfriend pick. 😀 It works for me at the horse track. Throw out the program.

I have had Martin's from the '70s and Guilds from pretty much the same era w/rosewood bridge plates that sounded great. If you ask around most want a maple bridge plate. Lighter = better sounding?! I don't know. Guitars are more than the sum of their parts. A great player can make a mediocre guitar sound incredible.

Good luck!

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Thanks for the replies. I drove 120 miles to the store convinced I would make the return journey home with at least one of them. The weight turned out not to be noticeable at all. I was a little surprised however by how different they both were. The first one definitely had a fuller sound and a really lovely bright projection. The second sounded slightly thinner and whilst still sounding great didn't excite me like the first one. I played them both for well over an hour with different plectrums including a thumb pick. The main issue for me in terms of not making a purchase was that both guitars had flaws. The first one had what looked like white mineral deposits in the rosewood fingerboard. I could have lived with that but there was also a very visible mark on the 6th fret which looked like a scratch or notch in the wood. The salesman suggested it was just in the grain but if i'm going to pay top notch for my dream guitar I don't want to be living with imperfections before I have even got it home! The second one had a perfect fingerboard but one side of the bridge felt really rough like it hadn't been fully sanded down properly prior to painting. Again I could have lived with that but to my ear it didn't sound so good as the first one.

 

I am still very much in the market for a new J-45 and will continue to search them out until I find one that sings, without imperfections and one that really says ... " YES I'm the One!" So the moral of this story is you really you do have to track them down and try them out. I was so tempted to just order one online as I have with other guitars but lesson learned. Always try them out before parting with your hard earned money.

 

Cheers!

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I was looking on-line for a J-45 with the view to buying. Ive noticed my favourite store has two in stock with one 4.4lbs and one at 4.7lbs. I guess this is down to the amount of nitrocellulose? Would it be better to go for the lighter one as the guitar with less paint would presumably breath better? Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

 

I had never even considered the weight of an acoustic before reading this thread... and now I've just weighed my 2008 J-45 at 4.1lbs, and that includes the 9v battery hiding in its little pouch inside the body. Mine only weighs 4.1lbs as the nitro has gassed-off over the last ten years - only joking!! [tongue] As others have pointed out above, any differences in the weight will be down to the wood, not the finish, etc. Having said that, I do use "light" strings. :unsure:

 

So long as the guitar plays well and sounds amazing, - which it should do being a J-45 - is a 4.4lb guitar better than a 4.7lb, purely based on weight? Most probably not. Buy it, play it, love it - you won't regret owning a J-45!

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