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Jinder

J180 opinions

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Can any of you good folks give me some opinions on real world experiences with J180s?

 

I’m normally a gentle and precise right hander, but when I play band gigs or similar all of that goes out the window and I rather enjoy wailing away playing rhythm. The two scratchplates are of course perfect for this kind of thing, but how do they affect the tone in reality?

 

Really intrigued to learn more about this overdressed J185!

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I got one.

It is a "Billie Joe" model (spruce/maple).

As usual (For me) I changed the sound system with K&K Triniti Mini.

I don't know why I feel the neck a little bit wider than the J45 or the J200

The sound is VERY balanced when strumming.

I play it with Elixir Ph Br 12/53

The unplugged sound is really balanced, but not strong.

The guitar is not loud when unplugged.

This thing IS BEAUTIFUL !!!

With 11 stars ( 10 on the fingerboard and one on the head plate).

I added one more to make them 12 (I changed the truss rod cover with a japanese one with a star on it)

I admit I did not play much on that guitar.

But I rely on it!

And OH YEAH IT IS B L A C K !!!!!!

Edited by MR GIBS

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I got one.

It is a "Billie Joe" model (spruce/maple).

As usual (for me) I changed the sound system with K&K Triniti Mini.

I also changed all the tusk/plastic crap (nut, saddle&pins) with bone.

I don't know why I feel the neck a little bit wider than the J45 or the J200

The sound is VERY balanced when strumming and when playing single notes too.

I play it with Elixir Ph Br 12/53

The unplugged sound is really balanced, but not strong.

The guitar is not loud when unplugged.

This thing IS BEAUTIFUL !!!

With 11 stars ( 10 on the fingerboard and one on the head plate).

I added one more to make them 12 (I changed the truss rod cover with a japanese one with a star on it)

I admit I did not play much on that guitar.

But I rely on it!

And OH YEAH IT IS B L A C K !!!!!!

Edited by MR GIBS

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Jinder,

This is the guitar that got it all started for me. The first Gibson guitar that I ever touched was The Everly. My dad got one of the 100 th anniversary reissues from '94. It was his dream guitar, and was a long time before he let me play it. I was just a beginner and boy was I jealous. I was hooked on all things Gibson for life when that guitar came into our house. I did finally get to play it when I started playing in church. He installed a pick up in it, and it was the only one we had that could be plugged in. And yes, it is a fun one to strum away on. Those anniversary ones were a little different than the classic idea of the J 180. They had a mustache bridge and the pick guard is like a black with white border type of thing. At the time I didn't know that it was any differen than the originals, but I really have always thaught they looked better the way Dad's is. The tortoise pick guards are ok, but I like his. Also, they were officially called the Everly, not the J 180 at that time. The double guard does subdue the sound a little, but like you alluded to, it is a fun strummer.

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Its just OK. Played a couple, reminds me a lot of J-100. It does the job but there is something missing, a tad bland.

Edited by EuroAussie

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At first glance, Gibson's J-180 and Everly series guitars are undeniably very individual and striking 'stage' guitars. That aside however, in actuality the first function of this model is to provide strong, percussive RHYTHM support for the vocalist but without too excessive a degree of volume. What is more, they also 'mike' wonderfully, projecting a very balanced tone yet without a certain bass-heavy 'boominess' often inherent to the larger-bodied guitars such as for instance, the 'J-200'.

 

Helpful to consider the J-180 and Everly models being designed rather more attuned to vocal support than focusing as 'solo' or acoustic lead instruments. (Aesthetics aside, therein lies their 'niche'.) Originally derived directly from the earlier 'J-185' configuration, many regard the likewise more curvaceous body shape of the 'J-180s' to be not only more comfortable to hold and to play but also aesthetically very pleasing, being visually within a class of their own.

 

'J-180'...the acoustic rhythm stage guitar to support the vocalist who desires sonic balance...but with a rather more comfortable (and sexy) body shape. Those double pickguards and star inlays providing something striking and tasteful yet eminently and recognizably, utterly distinctive!

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That's me demoing my J180 in the shop:

 

Sounds great, Krasi! Really bright and lovely note separation. Helped by your great playing of course. I’m definitely curious to try one for myself now!

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At first glance, Gibson's J-180 and Everly series guitars are undeniably very individual and striking 'stage' guitars. That aside however, in actuality the first function of this model is to provide strong, percussive RHYTHM support for the vocalist but without too excessive a degree of volume. What is more, they also 'mike' wonderfully, projecting a very balanced tone yet without a certain bass-heavy 'boominess' often inherent to the larger-bodied guitars such as for instance, the 'J-200'.

 

Helpful to consider the J-180 and Everly models being designed rather more attuned to vocal support than focusing as 'solo' or acoustic lead instruments. (Aesthetics aside, therein lies their 'niche'.) Originally derived directly from the earlier 'J-185' configuration, many regard the likewise more curvaceous body shape of the 'J-180s' to be not only more comfortable to hold and to play but also aesthetically very pleasing, being visually within a class of their own.

 

'J-180'...the acoustic rhythm stage guitar to support the vocalist who desires sonic balance...but with a rather more comfortable (and sexy) body shape. Those double pickguards and star inlays providing something striking and tasteful yet eminently and recognizably, utterly distinctive!

 

Nice job of putting the J-180 into perspective

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I have owned several J-180s over the years. Three were Billie Joe Armstrong models. The two that really

caught my attention were the Dwight Yoakum models. Basically the same guitar with a 25.5" scale. Blonde

finish. To my untrained ear, the increased scale length gave it a bit more punch. Whichever model you find,

the cool factor of the double pickguards is worth the price of admission.

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Interesting history regarding development of the Everly Brothers and J-180 models. You might be aware the double pickguards originated with Don Everly sketching his design for the basic shape on brown paper. (Legend has it from an ordinary grocery bag!)

 

...About 1959 or '60, Gibson builds J-200s sporting Don's new pickguard design for the Brothers to use on stage. Two were built in natural finish, possibly white(?)

and with black double guards. Two more constructed in black finish but with white double guards. Don't know for certain which finishes were the originals. Anyway, there are some photos round and about, perhaps you've seen them.

 

Gibson consulted with Don and eventually by mid '62 they settled on building guitars for the Everlys and based on the smaller bodied J-185 configuration. Don wanted stage guitars completely unique to their identity but which possessed better 'handling qualities' on stage and would not compete with nor overpower their vocal harmonies.

 

Gibson readily complied and so in time for the 1963 model year, there appeared the Everly Brothers model. Eventually to become...although many years later...the J-180.

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Requesting anyone who owns one of the '1993 J-180 Limited Edition Collector's Models' to respond here and please include the sequence number of your guitar in the series...(36 were built)...and also which 'appointments' your guitar features! Gibson Montana informs that they no longer can provide such production details on these older instruments.

 

Pickguard colors, tuners, certain hardware and headstock finishes on the instruments in this limited edition series were quite variable. For example, my own guitar is the final one built in this edition (#36) and it is black with an ebony fret board, white MOP stars and carries white-bordered, black pick guards. It also has gold hardware, gold keystone tuners and its entire headstock is MOP with the Gibson logo in gold and a single large gold star. There's a single MOP star on each wing of the ebony bridge. So far, my guitar is the only one I'm aware of with this particular configuration. From what I've discovered thus far, it seems these are 'all over the map' insofar as sporting a variety of factory installed appointments?! It's a curious and interesting series. Seems Gibson also made 'J-200s' and several other models in similar 'Collectors Edition' limited runs during '93. Have encountered some photos of these over the years to verify that.

 

Anyway, I am curious to learn who else owns one of these 36 guitars, built only for the '93 model year. If you should own one of these, Gibson has mounted a brass finished metal plate on the back of the headstock upon which is engraved: '1993 International Collectors Series' and includes the sequence number of each individual guitar built for the limited edition. Also, the orange sound hole label will specify same and including each guitar's model number, also its serial number.

 

...If you'd be so kind, please let me know if your 'J-180' is one of these '93s and among this exclusive club...Thanks!

Edited by Billy C.

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Just resuscitating this thread by way of thanks to the people who contributed...your opinions on the J180 are all by and large bang on. I’m really enjoying mine, thanks for your thoughts!

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