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2018 Les Paul fret board wood question/issue?

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On 3/21/2018 at 1:19 PM, Guest Farnsbarns said:

Erm... Granadillo is rosewood so it's entirely accurate to call it rosewood even if it is granadilla.

 

No it's not.    Granadillo belongs to the family Platymiscium

Rosewood and all its variants belong to the family Dalbergia

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Is Gibson's getting away with saying they're using rosewood when in fact they haven't been??  I've handled a lot of SG Standards over the years and while I've seen some pretty light boards, along with the trend of them getting lighter the last few years.  The 2018 SG Standards are advertised as having Rosewood fretboards.   But some of the 2018 SG Standards that I've seen are just too light and streaky to be any type of rosewood that I've been accustomed to.   Very questionable at least.

What do you think?  Btw, both these boards have been freshly oiled

Here's a couple pics..  The first is a 2018 SG Standard:

2018sgcherryfront.jpg

2018sgnonrose1.jpg

And here's pics of a 2017 SG Standard,

2017sgnonrose1.jpg

2017SGcherryfront.jpg

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7 hours ago, arcticsg said:

...some of the 2018 SG Standards that I've seen are just too light and streaky to be any type of rosewood that I've been accustomed to.   Very questionable at least...

 

As has been said earlier in the thread Rosewood can be any colour from pink (such as used by Rickenbacker) to nearly black and streaky wood is actually more commonly found than otherwise. In fact it is partly the decorative quality of rosewood - particularly Brazillian Rosewood - which makes it so sought-after by furniture makers.

Just by way of illustration here's a snap of blanks one type of Rosewood to give you an idea;

Rosewood.jpg

Pip.

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I realize that this is an old thread, but, it is still on the first page, so....

I've been following the rosewood vs. "rosewood" discussions on the Gibson forums for a while and have become quite curious, myself.  Now that I'm retired, I thought I would dust-off and exercise my old biology degree.  From my exhaustive research (primarily, just digging around on Wikipedia):

There are over 400 "families" of flowering plants.  Within these 400+ families are an estimate of 250,000 to 400,000 different species of flowering plants.  One of the 400+ is the family Fabaceae which contains 6 sub-families.  One of these sub-families is Faboideae.  Within this sub-family are many genera, two of which are Dalbergia and Platymiscium

(My point in all of the above is to suggest that Dalbergia and Platymiscium are relatively closely related genera.  I imagine that hard-core Brazillian rosewood fans might disagree with the previous statement and, especially, with what follows below, but, in my defense, the term "relatively" is a relative term.)

Some species of Dalbergia are considered "true" rosewoods, including the desirable Brazillian rosewood, Dalbergia nigra.  In fact, the only "true" rosewoods are found in the genus Dalbergia.  Some genera (other than Dalbergia) in the sub-family Faboideae  are still considered "rosewood", just not "true" rosewood.  Granadillo (one or more species of the genus Platymiscium) could be considered "a" rosewood, just not "true" rosewood.

I found no documented evidence to suggest that Richlite is related to either Dalbergia or to Platymiscium.

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3 hours ago, SteveFord said:

Isn't Richlite a subspecies of Linoleum?  

who knows what's in THAT stuff! :-k

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4 hours ago, SteveFord said:

Isn't Richlite a subspecies of Linoleum?  

 

36 minutes ago, kidblast said:

who knows what's in THAT stuff! :-k

 

By a curious coincidence 'Linoleum' is named after Carolus Linnaeus, the father of 'Taxonomy' - which is the scientific method of classification of the natural world - such as the 'Rosewoods' Dalbergia, Platymiscium etc as mentioned by Mr. Natural.

 

 

 

 

No. Not really. I just made that up.

Pip.

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2 hours ago, pippy said:

 

 

By a curious coincidence 'Linoleum' is named after Carolus Linnaeus, the father of 'Taxonomy' - which is the scientific method of classification of the natural world - such as the 'Rosewoods' Dalbergia, Platymiscium etc as mentioned by Mr. Natural.

 

 

 

 

No. Not really. I just made that up.

Pip.

yea had me, right till you pulled the plug on it at the end...  LOL!

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For the OP: my 2018 BFG has a fretboard that looks almost exactly the same as yours, and Gibson's legacy site still says it's Torrified Granadillo.

 

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