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MikeCT

Boveda in the case?

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I live in the Northeast where it is dry in the winter and humid in the summer. I keep Boveda packs in my two acoustic cases (and i try to keep the room 45-50% humidity when i can) and I’m wondering if i should put 1 or 2 pouches in the Les Paul case as well? I never did before with my old Strat (that I traded for the LP) but I’m more paranoid about humidity now after having the acoustics for close to a year........and I want to do whatever I can to keep the new LP in tip top shape.

 

Mike

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My guess is that your naturally "humid summer" won't result in any sustained drop in humidity less than 35% for winters. As such, you likely don't need to do anything. In my opinion, the only thing that affects guitars is a too arid environment, crazy high and low temperatures, and (I have heard) drastic and immediate temperature changes. High humidity is fine as along as there is no actual moisture. I have lived in numerous places (San Francisco Bay Area, Austin, Pittsburgh, Scottsdale, and now Colorado Springs). It wasn't until Colorado Springs that my guitars were affected. Before getting a room humidifier, the 20-25% naturally low humidity was causing my fretboards to shrink, leaving sharp fret edges on guitars that were previously perfect, and likely other less-noticeable problems too. With the room humidifier set at a minimum of 35%, I have no issues now. 45% is the ideal minimum humidity (my local Guitar Center has their humidifier set at 45% -- I checked). My room humidifier where my guitars are kept is set at 35% (instead of 45%) so my humidifier is not running as much, and goes much longer before re-fills; as such, my guitars are all happy with 35% setting and have no issues now.

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also in the north east (Central Mass).

 

I don't usually do much with the solid bodies, casem wem when not playing...

 

I do try to maintain the RH in my acoustics uke and mandolin. Can't wait for this winter to end. Goes on forever...

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Buy a small humidity meter from Home Depot, Lowes or whatever you have near you. They have them in the nursery section. Put it anywhere in the room you keep your guitars and you won't be guessing about what the humidity is or if you need to turn on a humidifier. As stated above, 35% is usually adequate to keep the guitars happy.

I recently did a two night gig at a mountain resort where it was freezing and snowing. When I got home my guitar had a nasty low E buzz. Luthier has it now and says the neck expanded from absorbing moisture. I'm not sure how that happened, but it's the worse weather related movement I've had in a guitar and a bit scary.

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As long as the humidity doesn't go too high it wouldn't hurt.

The Les Paul has a glued on top cap and mine has shrunk a bit on the Studio - no binding on it to hide the movement.

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just condition the fret board about once a year with choice conditioner like Professor Greens or such.

 

 

solid bodies don't need to be humidified like solid wood acoustics do..

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