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newfiesig

Static... Solved!

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Many of you will recall a post saying that I was done with Gibson as I had a 2017 Classic with a lot of static cracks and pops. I took it to a number of techs and they couldn't figure it out (without charging me for "trying things"). A number of people here were nice enough to offer solutions, however I didn't want to try anything that was not reversible without knowing for sure it would work.

 

When I called Gibson, they said to simply rub dryer sheets over the guitar. When I told them that it would work... but only for a couple of minutes. They said again to rub dryer sheets over the guitar and that Les Paul himself carried dryer sheets with him on gigs.

 

So I sold it.

 

Then I found an amazing 2015 Les Paul Trad Japan Ltd that had a magical neck. I ordered it and brought it home. Sounded amazing, played amazing... but... static!

 

Luckily, since this guitar was under warranty, I was able to bring it in to have a service call (and a setup). They simply sprayed the guitar with shielding paint and the static was all but gone (80% gone, now has a tiny bit of static, like all my other guitars).

 

I run a JVM with fairly high gain, which makes the problem of static much more prominent. I can only assume that the problem is fairly common, but goes unnoticeable by those who use no or low gain.

 

For those who do fight with this problem, this is the solution that has worked for me. Let me know if this helps!

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hey Good news there

 

but can you clarify..

They simply sprayed the guitar with shielding paint and the static was all but gone (80% gone, now has a tiny bit of static, like all my other guitars).

 

where was this done? I am assuming the control cavity, and switch housing route? Also maybe pickup routes???

 

can you detail this a bit for those who have been following your story?

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hey Good news there

 

but can you clarify..

They simply sprayed the guitar with shielding paint and the static was all but gone (80% gone, now has a tiny bit of static, like all my other guitars).

 

where was this done? I am assuming the control cavity, and switch housing route? Also maybe pickup routes???

 

can you detail this a bit for those who have been following your story?

 

Yes, of course.

 

They sprayed the control and pickup selector switch cavity. They didn't spray either pickup cavity.

 

I was shocked at how nonchalant the guy was. I took it to other techs who were perplexed. For this guy it was like I was asking for a restring.

 

I've scoured the net looking for a solution. In my case this is a real game changer. It begs the question, however, as to why this wasn't done at the factory.

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Yes, of course.

 

They sprayed the control and pickup selector switch cavity. They didn't spray either pickup cavity.

 

I was shocked at how nonchalant the guy was. I took it to other techs who were perplexed. For this guy it was like I was asking for a restring.

 

I've scoured the net looking for a solution. In my case this is a real game changer. It begs the question, however, as to why this wasn't done at the factory.

 

 

This is good to know, and why it's not a standard part of the build procedures, really a great question. (and, why would someone -1 this post?? no worries as I +1'd it! :)

Edited by kidblast

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Yup that did the trick in both of my Gibsons. Only I did it with copper foil, wich was a pita.

I did all cavities and are now 100% static free.

On clean amp settings and with tone and volume maxed out one could think the amp is switched off. It's literally dead quiet.

Congratulations, I'm glad you can finally enjoy a Gibson.

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Glad to see you are getting somewhere.

I've also seen folks line their electrical cavities with thin sheet copper and that seemed to help.

 

...and, why would someone -1 this post?? no worries as I +1'd it! :)...

Strange. Someone must have 'minused' it again as it was back down at -1 when I read it. I plussed it back again. What's to 'minus' in the post?......

Let's see if the impish scamp has another go!

 

Pip.

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Glad to see you are getting somewhere.

I've also seen folks line their electrical cavities with thin sheet copper and that seemed to help.

 

 

Strange. Someone must have 'minused' it again as it was back down at -1 when I read it. I plussed it back again. What's to 'minus' in the post?......

Let's see if the impish scamp has another go!

 

Pip.

 

That’s a good question... maybe someone likes the static and is offended by attempts to get rid of it?

 

Either way, the guitar sounds great now. The 59 Tributes just sing. Be nice to see them released again, but in the meantime I’d recommend grabbing them if you see them.

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That’s a good question... maybe someone likes the static and is offended by attempts to get rid of it?

 

Either way, the guitar sounds great now. The 59 Tributes just sing. Be nice to see them released again, but in the meantime I’d recommend grabbing them if you see them.

 

yea, It wouldn't take much for me to get into another les paul.. or 10. I've grown quite attached to my two standards over the years.

 

Really glad this was solved, and it's good to know how simple it was too. it really does make one wonder why such an easy step is not part of the final build.

 

 

Rock on!

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Sounds like you have some static caused somewhere in your environment.. Could be something to do with the electrics or some fan or luminescent light.. All these things can cause interference...

 

If they did the control cavity and its mostly gone.. I would get some copper tape and do the back plate.. That could get rid of all the static.. Its cheap and easy to do too.

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I'm surprised the cavity spray worked. Shielding the electronic and pickup cavities is very effective against hum pickup, but I've not experienced any static reduction as a result. The static electricity tends to build up on the pickguard and the body because the finish is non-conductive. Dryer sheets have a small amount of hydrophilic grease (aka "fabric softener") that conducts electricity very well. On a Les Paul, the static needs to be dissipated to ground via a metallic connection to the pickguard and/or body finish. Usually the bridge/tailpiece/pots/switch provide a good enough contact, assuming that the ground wiring is properly done. I'll bet your tech improved the ground connection after spraying the cavities - that is likely what reduced the static problem.

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Did you happen to see exactly what product was used?

 

I've never encountered the static thing but it might come in handy down the road.

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Sounds like you have some static caused somewhere in your environment.. Could be something to do with the electrics or some fan or luminescent light.. All these things can cause interference...

 

If they did the control cavity and its mostly gone.. I would get some copper tape and do the back plate.. That could get rid of all the static.. Its cheap and easy to do too.

 

Not environmental. I had a previous guitar to multiple techs. As well, none of my other guitars acted that way.

 

The back of the back plates are sprayed as well.

 

I'm surprised the cavity spray worked. Shielding the electronic and pickup cavities is very effective against hum pickup, but I've not experienced any static reduction as a result. The static electricity tends to build up on the pickguard and the body because the finish is non-conductive. Dryer sheets have a small amount of hydrophilic grease (aka "fabric softener") that conducts electricity very well. On a Les Paul, the static needs to be dissipated to ground via a metallic connection to the pickguard and/or body finish. Usually the bridge/tailpiece/pots/switch provide a good enough contact, assuming that the ground wiring is properly done. I'll bet your tech improved the ground connection after spraying the cavities - that is likely what reduced the static problem.

 

It was done at a reputable shop and they say they only sprayed the guitar. It was on the receipt as "shielding" for 30 bucks (which was covered by warranty).

 

Did you happen to see exactly what product was used?

 

I've never encountered the static thing but it might come in handy down the road.

 

I don't, I just know that it's a silver paint.

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Not environmental. I had a previous guitar to multiple techs. As well, none of my other guitars acted that way.

 

The back of the back plates are sprayed as well.

 

It is odd... Ive had many Gibsons.. None with shielding and personally never had an issue and never known anyone else who had this issue. And im not denying what you say but its not usual... I have also made guitars with no shielding and also never had an issue in any studio or guitar show I have been too even though I do shield these days as well, I think its just an extra precaution in case anyone does get an issue like you are seeing so is worth doing.

 

I have also heard about in the past. People with extreme body static. It does happen.

 

I also do wonder if its what you said earlier.. As you play at such high gain maybe you notice it more than most of us would.. Maybe some EMG active pickups would help?

Edited by Rabs

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It is odd... Ive had many Gibsons.. None with shielding and personally never had an issue and never known anyone else who had this issue. And im not denying what you say but its not usual... I have also made guitars with no shielding and also never had an issue in any studio or guitar show I have been too even though I do shield these days as well, I think its just an extra precaution in case anyone does get an issue like you are seeing so is worth doing.

 

I have also heard about in the past. People with extreme body static. It does happen.

 

I also do wonder if its what you said earlier.. As you play at such high gain maybe you notice it more than most of us would.. Maybe some EMG active pickups would help?

 

Google "Gibson static" and you will see a lot of posts, etc. talking about the problem. There are even videos on YouTube, however none of them have the problem as bad as I have.

 

I brought my 2017 Classic to a guitar tech a few months ago. Tech never heard of it and was shocked. Then he pulled 3 new gibsons off the wall (Explorer, Studio, SG) and they ALL had it, just not as pronounced as mine.

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Google "Gibson static" and you will see a lot of posts, etc. talking about the problem. There are even videos on YouTube, however none of them have the problem as bad as I have.

 

I brought my 2017 Classic to a guitar tech a few months ago. Tech never heard of it and was shocked. Then he pulled 3 new gibsons off the wall (Explorer, Studio, SG) and they ALL had it, just not as pronounced as mine.

Im not saying it doesn't happen.. We have seen it on here before.. But as you say, ive never heard it as bad as you describe... That's the odd part.. Usually one of the methods that have already been suggested previously works.. So I reckon there may be something else going on here..

 

Is it very dry where you live?

Edited by Rabs

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Im not saying it doesn't happen.. We have seen it on here before.. But as you say, ive never heard it as bad as you describe... That's the odd part.. Usually one of the methods that have already been suggested previously works.. So I reckon there may be something else going on here..

 

Is it very dry where you live?

 

Humidity is currently around 40%.

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Humidity is currently around 40%.

 

I'm really glad that your problem was solved and it was, as I suspected, a shielding problem. The techs you originally bought the guitar to, IIWY, I would never even think of having those guys work on one of my Guitars again, they are amatuers for sure. As soon as I heard what the problem was, my 1st thought was 'SHIELDING PROBLEM', no doubt.Really, a no-brainer actually. I have a 1994 GIBSON NIGHTHAWK and it is SILENT(as was/is my 1979 'SG'), and I can see where the shielding paint was sprayed in the control pocket cavity when it was manufactured. Why GIBSON stopped doing this IDK, but I do (as I mentioned in the first thread regarding your problem) still think it has something to do with the Plug N Play electronics and the PC Board that GIBSON USA is now putting in their guitars.The old soldering/shielding paint way was not broken and GIBSON USA went and 'Fixed' it, cough cough.

 

All of the 2016 & 2017 GIBSON USA Guitars I bought had this problem to a small degree, and it wasn't nearly as bad as your LP being un-playable. BUT A 2018 ES-335 I got 3 months ago doesn't have a problem and it is silent (the ES-335 has no PC Board in it). A new 2018 EXPLORER 'ELITE' I just got is Silent as well. I have yet to look in the control pocket cavity to see if it was shielded (and if so, what was it shielded with?). Meantime, I still have a 2017 'SG' & 2017 Les Paul that have some minor static sounds/pops when I run my hand on the back of the Control Pocket Cover. I want to stop it from happening and have the shielding tape to do it with BUT IDK if the ground wire is a plug n play connection or is actually soldered to the body of the guitar somewhere (Like the bridge post insert, for instance), so for the time being I have just put the tape in the P-Up cavities and routes to control pocket cavity and some of the popping is gone. I was even thinking of having the PC Boards taken out and having the guitars electronics soldered, and the cavities shielded, like the good old days before PLUG N PLAY, but it could be a pricey venture.

 

I C U only paid $30 to have the Guitar shielded, and/or it was covered under a warranty ? IDK, but I'm thinking Maybe I should find someone to do the shielding, as if its only a $30-$50 repair (even if its not covered) I would rather pay to have someone who is a pro do it than maybe give myself a headache trying to do it. But like I said, the only reason I haven't taped the control pocket cavity is because IDK if the Ground is P N P or soldered somewhere.

 

N E WAY, this whole episode just seemed awful and that it is sorted out is a good thing....

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Humidity is currently around 40%.

Id say that's fairly dry.. Its about the same over here at the moment as we are going through a heat wave.. And ive been getting static shocks off my car and various other things the last few days... which is not normal as usually its quite rainy over here.. It sometimes happens in winter too when it doesn't rain for a few weeks.

 

So if that's your usual weather then that could be causing some issues.. To which the answer is to get a humidifier for your playing room...

 

Not sure of that of course.. Just exploring another avenue.

Edited by Rabs

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I also do wonder if its what you said earlier.. As you play at such high gain maybe you notice it more than most of us would.. Maybe some EMG active pickups would help?

 

I had active pickups only briefly (didn't like 'em); but when plugged into my recorder it had a completely clean signal. Never happens with any regular pickup.

 

 

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned 1959 yet. Do they do static? If so, then its a 'period correct' feature.

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actually I've been thinking about posting all day.. for sure the guitars made in the 50's and again when the LP was reborn in what 67.. nobody thought of conductive paint or copper foil in the cavities..

 

we've covered this pretty good in his other post.. but It must come down to 'modern' day Nitro and plastic covers interacting with clothing material.

 

50+ yr old nitro has long since cured and if the guitar was lucky and 'loved' a lot.. the nitro has me mostly worn off.

 

 

anyways.. he's found a guitar he likes.. "found" a solution that was actually suggested in the other thread.. and carried through..

 

now he can start the 'love' process of wearing away the nitro.

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I have also heard about in the past. People with extreme body static. It does happen.

 

 

 

Guitarworld.com has a wonderful Spinal Tap interview from '92 on there right now - apparently their drummer before "Break like the wind“ imploded, or something. So anything's possible.

 

Of course, as was quoted, there were warning signs:

 

"He was not a well man. He had a jazz background. "

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