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mihcmac

Roller Bridges... Show me what you are using...

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I acquired a nice used cherry G400 and installed some humbucker sized GFS P-90's (similar to P94's), a T-O-M roller bridge and a Duesenberg Les Trem II. I have been playing it a lot lately.. For me, a very nice combination of mods. This is my 3rd Les Trem II, they are so easy to install, just replacing the stop bar and it can dive almost as much as a Strat.. :)

 

j05YU5Q.jpg

Edited by mihcmac
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WAOOOW !

 

IN-CRE-DI-BLE ! [unsure]

 

Interesting positioning on the Bigsby style tremolo's in addition to using a T-O-M roller bridge and T-O-M locking roller bridge.

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I have a Wilkinson Brass roller bridge from GFS on a couple of my guitars, an Epi Special II Les Paul that I put a GFS X-Trem on and Samick Flying V that I put a Les Trem II on

 

O1C45Xc.jpg

 

hCiIdF2.jpg

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I have a Wilkinson Brass roller bridge from GFS on a couple of my guitars, an Epi Special II Les Paul that I put a GFS X-Trem on and Samick Flying V that I put a Les Trem II on

 

 

Wow, I really like both of those .....

 

 

 

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My current arrangement on my G400 with TOM roller bridge, Duesenberg and GFS Mean P-90's...

2vN2LFC.jpg

The TOM roller bridge from Philidefia Luthier fits a little loose but doesn't seem to hurt anything.. Once in position I applied some Loctite and no more wobble...

 

Still having a lot fun playing the G400, it is so much lighter than my back killing 10lb Les Paul Standard Pro, that is also a dream to play... cTYjlbP.jpgLooking forward to my next project ..

Edited by mihcmac
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My left hand tremolo experiment using a locking T-O-M bridge with new mods adding GFS Dream 90's and a Towner Down Tension Bar.

I did the left hand tremolo to get the Jimi / Stevie Ray tremolo bar access, which works pretty well because the bar is always right under your hand....

BZ0dfUy.jpg

My stock Stop Bar 8mm Asian stud necks had to be reduced in size for the Towner Down Tension Bar to fit as it is sized for Gibson studs that have 1/4" necks.

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Installed a Stetsbar tremolo to replace my wraparound bridge on 61 SG.. works pretty good..

 

psFFCpe.jpg

 

XB8qASj.jpg

 

 

 

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I acquired a nice used cherry G400 and installed some humbucker sized GFS P-90's (similar to P94's), a T-O-M roller bridge and a Duesenberg Les Trem II. I have been playing it a lot lately.. For me, a very nice combination of mods. This is my 3rd Les Trem II, they are so easy to install, just replacing the stop bar and it can dive almost as much as a Strat.. :)

 

j05YU5Q.jpg

 

 

 

Beautiful ...

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I have always considered the way a Strat tremolo functions to be superior as strings are not dragged over the bridge, because the bridge and tremolo are one piece and move together with the intonation position getting very little movement. The main problem with the Strat style is the size of the cutout required to install one in another guitar. Finding a surface mount (non intrusive) tremolo for Gibson style guitars that give as much range of travel can be difficult. Bigsby and Les Trem's first require the strings not to stick on the nut, then sliding over the bridge can be a problem when returning to zero or tune position where roller bridges help out quite a bit. The Stetsbar style moves the bridge and sting stop as one piece and can easily come back to zero very accurately, similar to the Floyd Rose for Gibson style guitars. The main drawback is cost and that its a lot of metal on the front surface.. However they are very accurate and smooth a glass. In addition the extra weight of the Stetsbar helped reduce the neck dive on my Epiphone SG..

 

I try to avoid locking nuts as they usually work the best with fine tuners on the bridge/tremolo.

 

 

Edited by mihcmac
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Just for the heck of it, I stuck a rosewood bridge on my Wildkat over the weekend and was absolutely blown away by how much louder and brighter the guitar sounds vs. the tune-o-matic. I thought I'd get a darker, more muted sound with the wood bridge, but it's just the opposite. And it works fine with the tremolo. I suspect that over time, heavy use of the trem could cause the wound strings to start sawing away at the slots on the saddle, but I'm a very light trem user- just so touching the arm for color to my notes.

oqctmjm.jpg

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Interesting experiment. Have you used something to keep the bridge from moving, like double-backed tape?

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Interesting experiment. Have you used something to keep the bridge from moving, like double-backed tape?

 

Doesn't seem to be a problem, but again, I'm a pretty light player- no heavy rhythm or dive bombing the trem.

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Just for the heck of it, I stuck a rosewood bridge on my Wildkat over the weekend and was absolutely blown away by how much louder and brighter the guitar sounds vs. the tune-o-matic. I thought I'd get a darker, more muted sound with the wood bridge, but it's just the opposite. And it works fine with the tremolo. I suspect that over time, heavy use of the trem could cause the wound strings to start sawing away at the slots on the saddle, but I'm a very light trem user- just so touching the arm for color to my notes.

oqctmjm.jpg

Vey nice Yorgle.. Its been really interesting watching the evolution of your WildKat and the way you hollowed out material inside the body under the bridge changing the way it resonates...

 

I am currently looking for a hardtail tremolo for my Blueshawk. The string height is 7/16" at the bridge making it difficult to find a hardtail that includes a bridge that is low enough and with out too much body routing. I am looking at a Kahler hardtail so far, that only requires a small amount of routing below the tremolo..

 

2300c.png

or something similar since the Blueshawk bridge will not work with an add on tremolo...

Edited by mihcmac
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putz...

 

Yep the putz returns......

 

But on with my search tremolo hardware for my Blueshawk... After researching the spec's of everything I have looked at the 7/16 string height kills the use of the moving bridge type of tremolos, they can't get low enough, I was hoping for a one piece install. So now I looks like putting in studs for a TOM roller bridge of some type and a B5 style tremolo..

 

So I seem to be going tremolo nuts, after having a few very pleasing experiences with new setups. My guitars with tremolos are the only ones getting played. My modestly priced G400 project below started the trouble because I couldn't seem to play it enough, which caused me find the Stetsbar for my white SG. So now I'm on to solving my Blueshawk problem..

 

2vN2LFC.jpg

Edited by mihcmac
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mihcmac: I'm not very familiar with the Blueshawk, but if it has a bolt-on neck, you could use a neck-angle shim to gain some bridge height.

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mihcmac: I'm not very familiar with the Blueshawk, but if it has a bolt-on neck, you could use a neck-angle shim to gain some bridge height.

 

Yorgle, the Blueshawk has a set neck and a kind of fender style hardtail bridge. So its going to be a bit of work, I have gotten addicted to tremolos lately and my Blueshawk is my favorite guitar, so its next..[thumbup]

 

oO91gBk.jpg

Edited by mihcmac
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If a guy was willing to do a little routing underneath the stock blueshawk bridge/tail, you could make it into a poor-man's kahler style tremolo bridge. I'd make the bridge pivot on the back two mounting screws and replace the front two screws with alignment pins. One or Two compression type springs would be hidden beneath the bridge and a hole drilled and tapped somewhere on the bridge to accept a strat style arm. The beauty of this idea is that other than the tremolo arm, all of the modifications would be hidden underneath the otherwise stock bridge and could be easily filled in later if you ever wanted to return the guitar to its original condition. I'm almost tempted to buy a blueshawk just to try this.

qjHRs2H.jpg

Edited by Yorgle
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Very interesting Idea.. I have been thinking of something along those lines but the strings on the Blueshawk bridge are through body... Nice work on the photo, by the way..

 

There is a possibility I could drill holes in the plate below the saddle adjustment screws to pass the strings through to a tremolo..

 

better image of the bridge...........

 

BHawk3.jpg

 

the back showing the through body strings.....................

 

BHawk5.jpg

 

Rev had red flagged your post but I was able to cancel it out with a positive vote...

Edited by mihcmac
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What does the bottom of the bridge look like? Is it open under the saddles or are there individual holes for the strings to pass through? If it’s holes and they’re smaller than the eyes on the string ends, my idea could still work- the strings would just mount through the bridge instead of all the way through the body. Of course, this would mean that you’d have to remove the bridge to change strings.

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