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mihcmac

Roller Bridges... Show me what you are using...

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What does the bottom of the bridge look like? Is it open under the saddles or are there individual holes for the strings to pass through? If it's holes and they're smaller than the eyes on the string ends, my idea could still work- the strings would just mount through the bridge instead of all the way through the body. Of course, this would mean that you'd have to remove the bridge to change strings.

Sorry my camera is not so good, but the string goes through about an 1/8" hole..

LWzhX2U.jpg

Edited by mihcmac

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Sorry my camera is not so good, but the string goes through about an 1/8" hole..

LWzhX2U.jpg

 

That's good. You could use that hole to anchor the string (instead of the ferrules on the bottom of the guitar). I think the key to my plan will be coming up with a screw that can double as a pivot point for the bridge-might have to make something- either a screw with a hemispherical head or even a hemispherical insert. For trial purposes, just loosening the stock screws slightly would probably work but eventually they'd probably wear/tear out of the wood. Here's a crude (i.e., very crude) illustration of my idea. The routed out area is to give the bridge somewhere downward to go before bottoming out.

lzg7ECi.jpg?2

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Looking at my design, above, you could keep the strings anchored at the back of the guitar, but that would cause them to move in relation to the saddles like most trems but they appear to be rollers so maybe that would be fine. Anchoring the strings at the plate would keep the strings stationary in relation to the saddles.

 

I also see that the two alignment pins would have to be slightly smaller than the holes in the bridge (or slightly bent) to account for the arc followed by the bridge as it pivots.

 

I think you should send me your guitar so I can try this! [tongue].

Edited by Yorgle

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Looking at my design, above, you could keep the strings anchored at the back of the guitar, but that would cause them to move in relation to the saddles like most trems but they appear to be rollers so maybe that would be fine. Anchoring the strings at the plate would keep the strings stationary in relation to the saddles.

 

I also see that the two alignment pins would have to be slightly smaller than the holes in the bridge (or slightly bent) to account for the arc followed by the bridge as it pivots.

 

I think you should send me your guitar so I can try this! [tongue].

After looking at you ideas, I am re-evaluating and thinking of adapting the bridge for use with a B5 style tremolo. If I drill holes just below the saddle screw holes, then move the saddle screw down to the new hole, putting the saddle at a slightly increased angle, using the original saddle screw hole as a string guide to the B5. I think it will work..

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After looking at you ideas, I am re-evaluating and thinking of adapting the bridge for use with a B5 style tremolo. If I drill holes just below the saddle screw holes, then move the saddle screw down to the new hole, putting the saddle at a slightly increased angle, using the original saddle screw hole as a string guide to the B5. I think it will work..

 

That sounds infinitely more practical than my approach (though, much less adventurous). Be sure to post pics of the result.

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That sounds infinitely more practical than my approach (though, much less adventurous). Be sure to post pics of the result.

I am definitely looking for the easy way. I thank you for your efforts in designing a tremolo out of the existing bridge. Because of it I took a serious look and saw I could re-drill and move the saddle screws down. Anyway now to do it to my Epi or my Gibson, gold or nickel hardware...

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I just ordered a "Duesenberg Tremola Short" Nickel finish, for my Epi Blueshawk Deluxe.. So my stock bridge will be getting modified with new saddle screw holes shortly....

 

WEB_Image%20tdbsnx%20-1781972497.Png

 

I almost went with a Bigsby but I really like the Duesenberg adjustable dive bar..

Edited by mihcmac

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I successfully modified my Blueshawk bridge plate drilling new saddle screw holes, moving them down increasing the angle of the saddle. Then using the old saddle screw hole to pass the string through.

The Blueshawk and Nighthawk have very low bridges, mines string height measures at 13/32", making it very difficult to find a replacement bridge that can go low enough to work with a B5 style Tremolo.

My Duesenberg Tremola came in and after a few hours of measuring and making sure position and string angles would work, mounting went good...

nq9GGjM.jpg

The Duesenberg bar is round and locked in place with set screws making it very adjustable for the amount of travel you desire..

biAzMFu.jpg

So basically the hardest part was modifying the Blueshawk bridge (same as the Nighthawk bridge) to be able to pass the strings through to a B5 style tremolo.. Drilling the bridge plate was very tedious, as the new holes had to be very close under the old ones. Also the Vari-Tone switch head had to be modified as it came too close to the tremolo dive arm..

 

It is all working very good so far, I am very pleased with how it came out....[thumbup]

 

No roller bridge needed, not too much angle going over the bridge..

Edited by mihcmac

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Brilliant! A simple but elegant solution.

Thank you, this was my favorite of all my guitars, but as I started experimenting with tremolo's my Epi Blueshawk was collecting dust. Now I will see how it holds up to its stable mates...

 

Update: I have spent the day playing my Blueshawk, its really killer, I can't stop.....

 

 

Edited by mihcmac

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So basically the hardest part was modifying the Blueshawk bridge (same as the Nighthawk bridge) to be able to pass the strings through to a B5 style tremolo.. Drilling the bridge plate was very tedious, as the new holes had to be very close under the old ones. Also the Vari-Tone switch head had to be modified as it came too close to the tremolo dive arm..

 

It is all working very good so far, I am very pleased with how it came out....[thumbup]

 

No roller bridge needed, not too much angle going over the bridge..

 

Great job! The guitar looks awesome!

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And while we are on the topic: Here's my 2010 Riviera Ltd with Bigsby B7 and Duesenberg roller bridge:

 

Riviera_2010_zpspnttndsy.jpg

 

(It also has Grover Super Rotomatics, Gretsch Filtertron HS, 335 style pickguard, new harness and witchhead knobs. And yes, I actually have a couple of completely unmodified Epiphones [flapper] )

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And while we are on the topic: Here's my 2010 Riviera Ltd with Bigsby B7 and Duesenberg roller bridge:

 

(It also has Grover Super Rotomatics, Gretsch Filtertron HS, 335 style pickguard, new harness and witchhead knobs. And yes, I actually have a couple of completely unmodified Epiphones [flapper] )

Very nice job on your Riviera. You definitely have some very cool rides in your stable... [thumbup]

 

My first whammy bar experiment was on my Explorer, then came my 55 LP Std Pro, with its C profile neck turned out to be a very stable platform for a tremolo and because of its sculpted top the widest range tremolo action. Then I acquired a cherry G400 added humbucker sized P90's a roller bridge and a Les Trem II, this is where my trouble started because it worked so well it became my guitar of choice, also the stock black plastic nut works the best for equalizing string pressure. My white 61 SG got jealous and found a Stetsbar designed to use just the 2 studs of a wraparound bridge. My favorite guitar the Epi Blueshawk had way too much dust on it , so I had to find a cure.

 

Anyway 3 Les Trem's, 1 Stetsbar and 1 Duesenberg Tremola Short, later... The Duesenberg Les Trem II's were the easiest to install, quality built, non destructive, cost effective and most important of all best reaction range. With the bar set in max dive position it will make contact with the body before the spring is fully compressed getting about a full octave down.

 

The Stetsbar is amazing, smooth as glass, bridge moves with the tremolo, lots of versatile adjustments but also the most expensive. In the cost range of an FRX. Note there is a signature Britt Lightning Epiphone SG with an FRX coming soon..

 

kdWaS1c.jpg

My black 50th Ann Ltd Ed 61 SG Special is still all original and in pristine condition...

 

w0HeGiF.jpg

Note the Bigsby B5 would have worked about the same for the Blueshawk/Nighthawk as the Duesenberg Tremola Short..

My Epi Blueshawk is once again my most versatile all around Guitar and with a 25.5" scale neck..[thumbup]

Edited by mihcmac

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Mihcmac,

 

Are you in the US? Where can you get those Duesenberg Tremolas in the US? Whenever I google them, I only see them available in Europe or something.

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And is a Stetsbar a direct drop-in fit for an Epiphone wraparound bridge, like the wraparound bridges on Epi Special Is?

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Mihcmac,

 

Are you in the US? Where can you get those Duesenberg Tremolas in the US? Whenever I google them, I only see them available in Europe or something.

And is a Stetsbar a direct drop-in fit for an Epiphone wraparound bridge, like the wraparound bridges on Epi Special Is?

 

I live in Hawaii, all of my Duesenbergs came from Europe. I got one through Reverb that actually came from Rockinger Gutars in Germany, but most I bought on ebay, 2 of which came from a store in France, I went with best price and shipping.. Shipping was very quick, in most cases about a week..

 

Stetsbar is the only manufacturer I have found of a tremolo for direct replacement of a wraparound bridge... Kind of pricy though.. In the FRX range...

 

Stestbar site......

 

G1.jpg

 

One of the mods I have seen a lot on old Gibson Juniors and Specials with a wraparound bridge, is to add a hardtail tremolo still using the old bridge drawing the strings over the top going to the tremolo.

 

 

 

Edited by mihcmac

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E-bay purchase.

used one on a Wildkat

Dropped right in on existing posts.

 

33790218008_6f5133093a_b.jpg

 

Roller Bridge Tune-o-Matic for Epiphone guitars w/ m8 threaded posts - Nickel

 

philaluthiertools

 

(US $14.95

 

$3.74 Standard Shipping)

Edited by 212West

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E-bay purchase.

used one on a Wildkat

Dropped right in on existing posts.

 

Roller Bridge Tune-o-Matic for Epiphone guitars w/ m8 threaded posts - Nickel

 

philaluthiertools

 

(US $14.95

 

$3.74 Standard Shipping)

I used one of those TOM roller bridges from Philadelphia Luthier Tools as well on my G400 project, working quite well..

7ZezNUL.jpg

 

A new Duesenberg USA site is coming up, as well as their prices.. The cost of a new Les Trem II has been raised to $150, some old stock is still available on ebay at lower prices, but going up. I just bought a new one best price came from Australia..

Edited by mihcmac

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I used one of those TOM roller bridges from Philadelphia Luthier Tools as well on my G400 project, working quite well..

7ZezNUL.jpg

 

A new Duesenberg USA site is coming up, as well as their prices.. The cost of a new Les Trem II has been raised to $150, some old stock is still available on ebay at lower prices, but going up. I just bought a new one best price came from Australia..

The Tremolas cost $200, but @ least they’re available in the US.

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The Tremolas cost $200, but @ least they're available in the US.

I got the Duesenberg Tremola for about $160, off ebay, that I thought was a lot at the time.. My Blueshawk is my favorite guitar and really wanted a tremolo solution for it..

WEB_Image%20tdbsnx%20-1781972497.Png

I really like the X-Trem on my Epi LP Special II, and the prices are awesome

tPV84S5.jpg

Looks pretty good how do you like using it?

Edited by mihcmac

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I got the Duesenberg Tremola for about $160, off ebay, that I thought was a lot at the time.. My Blueshawk is my favorite guitar and really wanted a tremolo solution for it..

WEB_Image%20tdbsnx%20-1781972497.Png

 

Looks pretty good how do you like using it?

I think it might have less string travel than the Duesenberg Les Trem I have on my Samick V and the Bigsby B7 I have on a Hohner hollowbody, But i’m getting more and more used to it. I had to put a penny under the 1 1/8” spring (the tallest spring you can get for Bigsby-type trems) to make the bar less close to the body. Some people put a washer to raise the bar, but i’ve found that a penny works, too.

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