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Bird from a time capsule egg


E-minor7
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What would you think something like this would sell for?

On my iPad it sounded thin. In cans, it's sounded awesome. I can only imagine what a few years of play would do for it.

 

A guess would be between 5900 and 6500 USD.

Yes, it's still tight and newish - in my ears not as tempting as the beauty below. One of my faves on the Tube.

 

 

1963 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDTTri080ok

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That's one stunning-looking guitar, and it's a perfect example of the classic 'bird voice.

 

Wow. Just wow.

 

I suspect that sold before it hit the floor, and for top dollar.

It sold after they uploaded the video.Maybe within an hour.

 

As Mark often puts it “The good stuff doesn’t last”

 

 

 

I hope I stumble across a double guarded dove or hummingbird from [63-68]

At some point ... that way I would just need to get the bridge slotted for lefty playing+ nut.

 

 

 

JC

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Hey JC,

What does retired mean next to a few guitars in your sig? You sell those?

By the way, wouldn’t an option for you be to buy the bird you want, and then have aftermarket guards made to your liking? For example Holter Pickguards... just send him a template? Have JUAN on one guard and CARLOS on the other... life is short. Let everyone know who you are... :)

 

 

Cheers.

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Wow...much shinies! What a beauty. I have to wonder though, a bit like the double-guard Dove, what this poor little gem did wrong to be barely played for all those years.

 

 

My guess is it's a one-owner guitar that got put in a closet and ignored for most of its life. Don't blame the guitar for that one.

 

Em7 mentioned the high saddle, but you seem to see that sometimes on these adj models. The original bridges seem slightly thinner than their non-adj counterparts, and the necks sometimes seem overset in this period.

 

When that happens, you get some de-coupling of the saddle from the top, which can sometimes result in a thin voice. But on the good ones--especially with the ceramic saddle--you can get the distinctive, un-Gibson-like shimmer that I associate with the best mid-60's 'birds.

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Wow...much shinies! What a beauty. I have to wonder though, a bit like the double-guard Dove, what this poor little gem did wrong to be barely played for all those years.

Had the same thoughts. Something sad, , , perhaps an accident could lie behind a case like this.

The owner injured his hands just after purchasing the guitar, , , or his son for whom it was a present, perished in an 18-year birthday car crash.

So it was kept in his un-touched room for nearly 6 decades. Uaaakk, , ,

okay, maybe it was just owned by a very gentle lady, who only finger-picked Where Have All The Flowers Gone once or twice every fall.

 

 

My guess is it's a one-owner guitar that got put in a closet and ignored for most of its life. Don't blame the guitar for that one.

 

Em7 mentioned the high saddle, but you seem to see that sometimes on these adj models. The original bridges seem slightly thinner than their non-adj counterparts, and the necks sometimes seem overset in this period.

 

When that happens, you get some de-coupling of the saddle from the top, which can sometimes result in a thin voice. But on the good ones--especially with the ceramic saddle--you can get the distinctive, un-Gibson-like shimmer that I associate with the best mid-60's 'birds.

 

As some will know, I like and have a bunch of adjustables and always make the saddles get full contact with the 'top-floor'.

Okay in rare occasions one of the screws are turned a hair. But only to avoid or reduce a certain buzz.

I really dig to fine-tune these oldies until suddenly finding their sweet spot. A bit of a holy moment, that is.

 

It must be added that there's almost no limit to how different these first-wave squares sound. And I'm a fool for it.

In a fantasy I buy 50 mixed 1960 to 64 Hummingbirds, Southern Jumbos and Country Westerns and bury my soul in them during a long deep winter.

Then come out in the spring with one of each, , , , and an unparalleled degree of expertise too, , , reporting here like mad. .

 

Well, lesser can do it. Here's the pic of the 11/16 1965'er that came to visit my 63'er in the early summer.

 

65 meets 63 ~ WTp3pKh.jpg

 

Same voice, but mine much more open than the close to mint guest.

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Hey JC,

What does retired mean next to a few guitars in your sig? You sell those?

By the way, wouldn’t an option for you be to buy the bird you want, and then have aftermarket guards made to your liking? For example Holter Pickguards... just send him a template? Have JUAN on one guard and CARLOS on the other... life is short. Let everyone know who you are... :)

 

 

Cheers.

 

 

Sal,

 

The Sj 200 is out of retirement but I’ll have to do a post about that.

The hummingbird still isn’t in my possession and I’m thinking about if I should get it back but just not ready yet.

 

As far as doing custom guards ... I believe that the guards are part of the allure of these awesome birds.

 

 

 

Btw congrats on your new AJ!

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Had the same thoughts. Something sad, , , perhaps an accident could lie behind a case like this.

The owner injured his hands just after purchasing the guitar, , , or his son for whom it was a present, perished in an 18-year birthday car crash.

So it was kept in his un-touched room for nearly 6 decades. Uaaakk, , ,

okay, maybe it was just owned by a very gentle lady, who only finger-picked Where Have All The Flowers Gone once or twice every fall.

 

 

 

As some will know, I like and have a bunch of adjustables and always make the saddles get full contact with the 'top-floor'.

Okay in rare occasions one of the screws are turned a hair. But only to avoid or reduce a certain buzz.

I really dig to fine-tune these oldies until suddenly finding their sweet spot. A bit of a holy moment, that is.

 

It must be added that there's almost no limit to how different these first-wave squares sound. And I'm a fool for it.

In a fantasy I buy 50 mixed 1960 to 64 Hummingbirds, Southern Jumbos and Country Westerns and bury my soul in them during a long deep winter.

Then come out in the spring with one of each, , , , and an unparalleled degree of expertise too, , , reporting here like mad. .

 

Well, lesser can do it. Here's the pic of the 11/16 1965'er that came to visit my 63'er in the early summer.

 

65 meets 63 ~ WTp3pKh.jpg

 

Same voice, but mine much more open than the close to mint guest.

 

 

When was the final year for the 1 11/16’s nut?

 

 

 

 

 

JC

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Alrite, why not prolong this theme with a sweet Dove. Only reason would be it deserves (a probably might get) a thread of its own.

I like it including the T-O-M-bridge and hereby suggest that mister Mark starts his strumming half on a gentler level and then works his way up.

Last week he actually strummed the '65 Bird less hard so it can be done.

 

Anyway - enjoy a maple flight from back when Petty didn't even know Dylan was born.

(or did he)

 

 

1964 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9m_2ssr0qk&list=PL-8DgYWallt4qxImM92WBZ4wjOez9Sonn

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Alrite, why not prolong this theme with a sweet Dove. Only reason would be it deserves (a probably might get) a thread of its own.

I like it including the T-O-M-bridge and hereby suggest that mister Mark starts his strumming half on a gentler level and then works his way up.

Last week he actually strummed the '65 Bird less hard so it can be done.

 

Anyway - enjoy a maple flight from back when Petty didn't even know Dylan was born.

(or did he)

 

 

1964 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9m_2ssr0qk&list=PL-8DgYWallt4qxImM92WBZ4wjOez9Sonn

A good sample of how a mid sixties Dove might sound. Thinking about all of the well-known demos out there, from Tony P, MF Private Reserve, 蜂鸟吉他 Fly Music; though Mark from Norman's would really catch more of the fingerpicked sound on the Sheryl C. song with some fingernails, it provided a fine chance to hear just the guitar. Ditto on the T. Petty tune, where not many demos (w/ the exception of Greg K for Wildwood Guit) have the guitar operating at 9 tenths of it's limit (Mark keeps it from getting out of control with his right palm).

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