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WScott

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Hi All,

 

I am Scott. I am 78. After playing a 12 string Ovation most of my life, I just changed to Gibson. It was a big change. I only wish I could have afforded it years ago. I am now the proud owner of an L-5, an ES-175, an ES-335, and a Switchmaster. Of course, they are not new. But I just love every one. Each one has its own tone and character. I will one day pass one on to each of my four children. But they will probably give them to grandchildren or an ever growing number of great grandchildren.

 

I am also changing from primarily a Country player to primarily a Jazz/Standards player and I will continue to look for work singing and playing as soon as I learn the music a little better.

 

My guitars sound the way I always thought a good guitar should sound. They each feel like driving a Mercedes rather than a VW Bug. I tried several other jazz guitar companies on my way to investing in Gibson. None of them came close to what I am experiencing with my Gibson guitars.

 

I will post serial numbers before long to get the most complete information to pass on to my children.

 

It is good to be a Gibson owner. Scott

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Welcome aboard Scott. Quite an impressive collection of Gibsons. I have an ES-335 and would love to have an L-5 and ES-175. I'm sure it won't take long before other members will be asking you to post photos.

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Welcome to the forum Scott. Great choice you have in guitars [thumbup] As well as some Les Pauls and SG's I too own an L5CES, Switchmaster and an ES 175, (though I don't have a 335) and agree 100% with your comments about how great they are. Mine are modern versions of these guitars though and not vintage. You are the first guy I've seen on the forum who owns a Switchmaster besides myself. What year is yours from? I always thought the Switchmaster was a highly underrated guitar. A lot of jazzers seemed to think the three pickups were unnecessary and they never fully took off as you probably know. I love Switchmasters and feel I'm in a small group of players who truly appreciate what fine instruments they are. Obviously L5's and ES 175's are equally brilliant too in their own individual way. Btw, that's my L5 and Switchmaster pictured in my avatar picture thing and my 175 is in my profile one.

Edited by cody78

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Welcome to the forum Scott. msp_thumbup.gif I had a 12 string Ovation as a teen for about a decade, Loved it. Congrats on your Gibson family too. Very nice guitars.

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Welcome aboard Scott. Quite an impressive collection of Gibsons. I have an ES-335 and would love to have an L-5 and ES-175. I'm sure it won't take long before other members will be asking you to post photos.

Thank you. I will post some pictures. I am holding the L-5 now. The Switchmaster and the ES-335 are in with my set-up man for checking and fine tuning. And I have not received the ES-175 yet. I traded another guitar for it. It is a 1978 model. I am an old guy, but the guitars make me feel lucky despite my age. The ones I already have are just a pleasure to play.

Scott

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Welcome to the forum Scott. Great choice you have in guitars [thumbup] As well as some Les Pauls and SG's I too own an L5CES, Switchmaster and an ES 175, (though I don't have a 335) and agree 100% with your comments about how great they are. Mine are modern versions of these guitars though and not vintage. You are the first guy I've seen on the forum who owns a Switchmaster besides myself. What year is yours from? I always thought the Switchmaster was a highly underrated guitar. A lot of jazzers seemed to think the three pickups were unnecessary and they never fully took off as you probably know. I love Switchmasters and feel I'm in a small group of players who truly appreciate what fine instruments they are. Obviously L5's and ES 175's are equally brilliant too in their own individual way. Btw, that's my L5 and Switchmaster pictured in my avatar picture thing and my 175 is in my profile one.

The Switchmaster is a 1997. The L5 CES is a 1996. The 335 is 1963 VOS, so I am not sure yet what year it was produced, but it plays great. I do not have the 175 yet but it is paid for and it is a 1978 that is reported to play and sound great. The Switchmaster has the nicest, slightly high pitched, tone. And it is so responsive I can't believe it. The gain on the bridge pick-up is so loud I can[t believe that either. I got a better feeling for the tone variances on the L-5 after my set-up man worked on it. And I expect similar results from the Switchmaster and 335. Each of my guitars will go to one of my four children one day. I don't have much. I am a retired 25-year military person. So I have a guitar and an amp for each of them. I can't think of anything better musically to leave behind me.

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Welcome to the forum Scott. msp_thumbup.gif I had a 12 string Ovation as a teen for about a decade, Loved it. Congrats on your Gibson family too. Very nice guitars.

I actually traded two Martins for the brand new Ovation Elite 12-String in 1982. In retrospect, I regret trading the Martins - but there wasn't much cash in my pockets at the time. One was a 1976 D-28 that I bought new. My first good guitar. The other was much older, a small body 12 string that was in need of repairs. The dealer was really excited about the old Martin 12 String. I don't even remember where I got it (a problem when you are 78). But the dealer took both of them for Elite 12-string he had just taken out of the box from Ovation. It was the only guitar I used until 2017. It needed repairs. I probably should have had it repaired. I was not aware of the market for older guitars. I know I bought an Epi made in Michigan in the 60's and one of my son's finally sold it in about 2010 - for more than I paid for it! The Ovation was good to me but I only played and sang Country, "cowboy chords" as they say. Now I am spending every free hour trying to learn to play jazz chords and music, despite the fact I don't have a fully functional, straight finger on either hand. :) The little finger on my left hand may need to be cut off one day. I can only hit the strings with the side of it. But I still feel lucky to be able to play at all. I have four guitars that sound like what I always thought a good guitar should sound like! I am lucky. :)

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....I am an old guy, but the guitars make me feel lucky despite my age....

 

Well, "old" is relative. My 96-year-old dad loves his Gibson LP Studio. msp_cool.gif

 

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Hi Scott and a warm welcome to you....[thumbup]

 

Ex Ovation 12 -er here too

 

Interested to hear your choice of amps for your 'jazz quiver'

 

V

 

:-({|=

I had two amps before I was able to get the Gibson guitars. I bought two to use with the Gibson guitars. They are: a Henriksen Jazz amp and a Henriksen Bud. They were expensive, I got one new. I of course wanted a nice traditional Fender jazz amp but they are all so heavy I did not think I could carry them. At 78 that is a big consideration for me, with amps and speakers! And the best Fenders were even more expensive than the Henriksen amps. My wife thinks I am crazy now for spending as much as I have.

The sound through the Henriksen amps is great, even the small Bud is far better than I expected. I also bought a used Henriksen Extension Cabinet. All the Henriksen stuff is relatively light. And, at least to my untrained jazz ear, the guitars sound wonderful through them.

The two prior amps I had are a Fender Acoustic 200 and a Boss Singer Pro. I also have a Peavey Escort 6000. It seems to have a good amp, with dedicated sub and monitor Out's. But the sound through the stock speakers was poor so I had to buy the lightest good speakers I could find, Peavey x-12's. I have some hydraulic speaker stands that I use. and need, to even get the light x12 speakers up.

I have a couple of small powered speakers too that work well off the Out's on the 200 and Singer Pro amps. So I have versatility when it comes to selecting a set-up for small to medium sized venues.

I used to have a rack with a heavy amp and large Peavey speakers and once played the big outdoor stage with my Ovation at Bull Run in Virginia ahead of Marty Haggard. But that was many years ago.

I have always played as a single with guitar and midi backing tracks. Again, being a single performer always gave me independence and versatility with a bigger Peavey set-up.

So, long post, but a full run down of my speaker options. :) Regards, Scott

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As I promised I am posting pictures of my four guitars. I just got two back from the Set-up Man. He does a great job.

 

I am also listing the serial numbers of the four guitars. I think I have the wrong year of manufacture on a couple of them. So I would appreciate if someone could give me the correct years and places of manufacturing on the four of them so I can pass that information on to my children - who will one day become the owners! ;)

 

L-5: 91456004

Switchmaster: 90947007

ES-335 VOS: 70222

ES-175: 71368009

 

Thank you all!!

 

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post-96904-029694500 1546451303_thumb.jpg

post-96904-055742200 1546451478_thumb.jpg

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Hi Herman,

 

Thank you. I decided to pass part of his "inheritance" on early to my second son (he is the only one playing guitar at this time) by sending him the 1978 ES-175. But he is not sure he should take it. [unsure]

 

I discovered it is actually a "second." But I think with the great quality control they had back in '78 that does not mean much. The guitar seems sound structurally. And I love the sound it puts out through my amps.

 

I would think it should start to appreciate soon. It is over 40 years old, sounds great, and was probably made in the old Kalamazoo plant. I thought I read that the "seconds' were so good there they offered them to their employees first.

 

I love playing all four of them. But the mellow L-5 fits most of the music I play best.

 

Do you think anyone from Gibson will respond to my request for information about the four serial numbers? Or is there a better place I should post them to get a response?

 

I hope you had a great Holidays! Scott

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Hi Herman,

 

Thank you. I decided to pass part of his "inheritance" on early to my second son (he is the only one playing guitar at this time) by sending him the 1978 ES-175. But he is not sure he should take it. [unsure]

 

I discovered it is actually a "second." But I think with the great quality control they had back in '78 that does not mean much. The guitar seems sound structurally. And I love the sound it puts out through my amps.

 

I would think it should start to appreciate soon. It is over 40 years old, sounds great, and was probably made in the old Kalamazoo plant. I thought I read that the "seconds' were so good there they offered them to their employees first.

 

I love playing all four of them. But the mellow L-5 fits most of the music I play best.

 

Do you think anyone from Gibson will respond to my request for information about the four serial numbers? Or is there a better place I should post them to get a response?

 

I hope you had a great Holidays! Scott

 

I'm not for sure if any of the numbers changed since I contacted Gibson almost 6 years ago but YES, they will definitely respond if you call or Email them. When I retired from the Railroad at 60, I was at GC and in the used section was this gorgeous Gibson GT. So I took it down and closely checked it out. It was flawless and had no signs of ever been played. No info so I asked an employee about it and he said another guitar shop couldn't sell it so they shipped it to GC and they had to sell it used. Why used if it was new I thought? I had my suspensions so for $1,400.00 I bought it and E-mailed Gibson customer service. They responded it was a older Gibson than what GC center told me, they said it was a 2012. It indeed was a Standard and sold for $3,445.00 in 2007 new. So I thought I hit the jack pot. It was in mint condition new, never owned before. You can call them at:

1-800-4GIBSON. or send them a E-mail at: service@gibson.com

Yes we had a great year except for some plumbing problems which have been solved somewhat so far and they will be back at it this year in January. My Vox amp I used a lot finally blew out but got a new Fender tube amp, a Super Champ X2 for Christmas and I love it. My wife bought it fo me bless her heart. She has also given me 6 other guitars since we've been married 39 years as of last November.

 

 

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Wow, how does your wife know what to buy you when it comes to guitars? That is wonderful. My wife and I hit 34 last November. But it is actually my third marriage.

 

I have been thinking about a Fender Blues Junior III. But i spent a lot on a Henriksen Jazz Amp and a Henriksen Bud. One was used. They are both solid state but the sounds seem great to me. I actually thought about all the Fender amps but some jazz instructor I saw on You Tube recommended the Henriksen amps. So I got one used and liked it so much I got the smaller Bud new. I like the fact that the Bud has two channels and two line outs plus another out to go to a Henriksen cabinet. So I got one of them too. I use MIDI files to back up my singing and playing. My playing is very weak -- and getting worse since my fingers started curling. But I just love the sound of the jazz guitars and keep trying to learn as much as I can -- after a very, very late start. [rolleyes]

 

I found there is actually a new part of this forum that is just for trying to find out things about your Gibson guitar. They ask for serial numbers, pictures, descriptions, etc. I gave them all the information I had. There were a lot of people who had already submitted requests for information. So I fully expect they will be back to me soon. I don't think mine will hard to identify.

 

I wrote down the 800 number and the e-mail address. Thank you. Do you still have the 2007 Gibson? I only hope it has continued to appreciate. All of my guitars will go to my children as their "inheritance." They may not get much more than that. But they are all doing well. I am proud of them. They all live in Minnesota.

 

I am always happy to know of someone who actually retired when he could still get a retirement check. I have a friend in Arizona who has kept getting his from IBM for more than 30 years. And I have now been getting my retired military check for longer than the 25 years I served. Too many people have lost their retirements or are working now without any hope of ever having a retirement. It is sad. None of my kids will have a retirement income and they are all between 50 and 60 years old. Social Security is all there is left. And there are some that want to reduce that. Sad.

 

Good talking with you, Herman! Scott [wink]

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Hi Chadgauge,

 

Thank you. I am 78 and my plan was to get some good guitars and then leave them to my children as part of their "inheritance." I just mailed the ES-175 off to one of them today. I suppose the ES-335 will be the next to go.

 

I just love playing the L-5 and the Switchmaster. I could not play all four of them so I decided to send a couple off early. I am pretty healthy so I am hoping I will be around a while. And playing the L-5 and the Switchmaster will be more than enough to keep me busy.

 

What Gibson's do you have ? Do you play professionally? I am a poor guitar player who played simple chords for about 30 years on one 12 string. I wore it out. Now in my old age I am doing my best to learn as much about playing jazz as I can. It is an impossible task. But it keeps me anxious to get up every morning and get at it. :)

 

Thanks for your message. Scott

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Wow, how does your wife know what to buy you when it comes to guitars? That is wonderful. My wife and I hit 34 last November. But it is actually my third marriage.

 

I have been thinking about a Fender Blues Junior III. But i spent a lot on a Henriksen Jazz Amp and a Henriksen Bud. One was used. They are both solid state but the sounds seem great to me. I actually thought about all the Fender amps but some jazz instructor I saw on You Tube recommended the Henriksen amps. So I got one used and liked it so much I got the smaller Bud new. I like the fact that the Bud has two channels and two line outs plus another out to go to a Henriksen cabinet. So I got one of them too. I use MIDI files to back up my singing and playing. My playing is very weak -- and getting worse since my fingers started curling. But I just love the sound of the jazz guitars and keep trying to learn as much as I can -- after a very, very late start. [rolleyes]

 

I found there is actually a new part of this forum that is just for trying to find out things about your Gibson guitar. They ask for serial numbers, pictures, descriptions, etc. I gave them all the information I had. There were a lot of people who had already submitted requests for information. So I fully expect they will be back to me soon. I don't think mine will hard to identify.

 

I wrote down the 800 number and the e-mail address. Thank you. Do you still have the 2007 Gibson? I only hope it has continued to appreciate. All of my guitars will go to my children as their "inheritance." They may not get much more than that. But they are all doing well. I am proud of them. They all live in Minnesota.

 

I am always happy to know of someone who actually retired when he could still get a retirement check. I have a friend in Arizona who has kept getting his from IBM for more

than 30 years. And I have now been getting my retired military check for longer than the 25 years I served. Too many people have lost their retirements or are working now without any hope of ever having a retirement. It is sad. None of my kids will have a retirement income and they are all between 50 and 60 years old. Social Security is all there is left. And there are some that want to reduce that. Sad.

 

Good talking with you, Herman! Scott [wink]

 

Its no secret with her getting me guitars. When we married she was in a small house and I had around 13 guitars or so, A very expensive amp a banjo and more. I ended up selling everything as we were short on space. When I left the Railroad at 60 and over 34 years invested which is full retirement I wanted to get back in playing so when I want a guitar we go to the music shop and I start playing the ones I'm interested in and she buys that one for my present. I have 7 guitars and 2 amps as of now. I traded 2 older cheap ones off for a Yamaha 12 string. Actually wanted a Seagull 12 but neither store had one. I find stuff on line but never bought off it before. I like to see and play what I get. No surprises. This year will mark 40 years together for us. I loved the Fender Blues JR. but again, neither store had one. My other amp is a solid state Fender Mustang 2.

Yeah, I have arthritis in the pinky fingers some, the left is curled up some and hard to use especially reaching for that 4th fret. Over the years I learned a few tricks to avoid that finger but I can use it very limited but mostly avoid most songs that require using it. But in 6 years I can play over 40 songs which is way more than when I learned at 13 to 28 years years old. Congrats on you military service years too. My Uncle retired in the Air Force. Yeah, the Railroad was a job you wanted to leave as soon as you legally could with full retirement. Too many guys I knew that died or got hurt so bad they had to leave early.

 

 

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I did not know the Railroad business was so dangerous. I am glad you made it through. I know I always feel lucky to have made it through Vietnam and Korea, which was still a very dangerous place with a nightly nation-wide curfew when I was there in the early 60's, without a scratch. I was working at the Pentagon on 9/11 and the blast rocked my chair. If you see a tall guy in a white hard hat walking around in the smoke that was me. I sent all the contractors home right after the blast but stayed around to do what I could for the First Responds until midnight. So I feel lucky for a lot of reasons.

 

But I can't stretch my little finger sideways at all. Either I get it over the string and drop is down or it is no good. So it can't make any stretch to a fourth fret and full bar major chords are becoming a problem too. And on most chords I actually have the side of the little finger on the string. So more and more chords are becoming impossible it seems like each day. They tell me I could lose the little finger completely in a few year. So I keep looking for different ways to play some chords. And I am just beginning to learn the almost unlimited ways you can play some jazz and triad chords.

 

I would like a Blues Jr too. Maybe one day I will pick one up. I have exhausted my desire to buy new guitars and love the ones I have. Like I think I said, they will all go to my kids, one already has. I promised them each an amp too. All the ones I have are solid state and I will probably buy a Blues Jr III some day just to try one tube amp before I die.

 

I really can't play well enough to solo on any tune. I have really limited dexterity in my left hand. But I am still a fair singer and love the sound of the jazz guitars even with my limited finger picking.

 

So what are the seven guitars you have now?

 

Good talking with you! Scott :)

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Hey Scott:

 

Just asked you for feedback on the other "Four Guitars" thread on which guitars you liked and why, but see you've covered all the bases. A few thoughts, from someone in a more or less similar position. I played classical guitar many many years ago, then started playing bass again last spring when my old grad school band played for the 35th reunion, having not played since the 15th reunion. Just retired, and it was so much fun I started playing again...but like any bass player, I really have always wanted to be a guitar player. I've got a great teacher who I go to every few weeks, but am mostly learning from tabs and Youtube. I'm finding the biggest thing right now for me to do is to do some ear training for intervals, scales in various modes--especially as I've never used a pick before--and then ease my way into the various cool chords by simply copying tunes, with my teacher able to suggest which ones are appropriate for me to take on, as well as giving me the various needed course corrections when I start getting some bad (mostly picking) habits. What's your plan of attack on learning jazz? Any favorite source of teaching? And what tunes are you learning?

 

Ty

 

 

I actually traded two Martins for the brand new Ovation Elite 12-String in 1982. In retrospect, I regret trading the Martins - but there wasn't much cash in my pockets at the time. One was a 1976 D-28 that I bought new. My first good guitar. The other was much older, a small body 12 string that was in need of repairs. The dealer was really excited about the old Martin 12 String. I don't even remember where I got it (a problem when you are 78). But the dealer took both of them for Elite 12-string he had just taken out of the box from Ovation. It was the only guitar I used until 2017. It needed repairs. I probably should have had it repaired. I was not aware of the market for older guitars. I know I bought an Epi made in Michigan in the 60's and one of my son's finally sold it in about 2010 - for more than I paid for it! The Ovation was good to me but I only played and sang Country, "cowboy chords" as they say. Now I am spending every free hour trying to learn to play jazz chords and music, despite the fact I don't have a fully functional, straight finger on either hand. :) The little finger on my left hand may need to be cut off one day. I can only hit the strings with the side of it. But I still feel lucky to be able to play at all. I have four guitars that sound like what I always thought a good guitar should sound like! I am lucky. :)

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HI, Ty.

 

Thank you for your post. I am afraid I have a less ambitious plan than yours. You probably read I am 78 and have a genetic problem causing my fingers to curl. I have already lost almost all use of the little finger on my fretting hand. I may lose it altogether in the years ahead.

 

I also do not have a good musical background. I am self taught. I played very part-time as single Country singer through much of my 25 years in the military and my years of working after I retired from the military. I played open chords on a single 12-string all those years. So I do not have the time, background or the dexterity to really learn to play jazz with any degree of competence.

 

BUT, :) , there is always a BUT, since grade school, I have always been primarily a singer anyway. So my plan is one of self study to try to learn to sing as many standard jazz tunes as I can -- as you know they are tougher to play and sing than Country songs. But I have over 100 standards in my hand-produced lead sheet book already. As I sing, I study some instruction books I have, learn as much as I can about chords, scales, etc., and try to enjoy playing the great guitars I have gradually acquired over the past two years. I have a great Henriksen amp. And I have used MIDI backing tracks for my singing since about 1994. So I have a lot of them, some now with Big Band sounds.

 

I have always loved the sound of jazz and especially jazz guitars. But I could not afford a good jazz guitar until all the kids were gone and the mortgages paid. Now I can spend hours practicing songs, chords, etc. Many chords I have to finger in less than the optimal way. But the midi tracks cover me a bit. I have been really pleased to get so I can play a number of standards now without the midi -- just me and one of the mellow guitars. This is satisfying.

 

I no longer have all four of my Gibson guitars. My plan was always to leave them to my children as part of their inheritance. The two boys play a bit so they received their guitars before Christmas, the 335 and the 175. My step son is picking up a very nice Heritage guitar I have for him. The final two Gibson's will go to my daughters, but, they hope, not for a long time. [wink] And the grandchildren and great grandchildren may like to him them one day too.

 

So I am happy to hear you are taking up Jazz guitar so seriously. I wish I had done so many years ago. I am sure you will get great pleasure from it. My two sons have already told me they have a hard time putting their guitars down once they start to play.

 

Life really is short! Do what you love! Scott

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I did not know the Railroad business was so dangerous. I am glad you made it through. I know I always feel lucky to have made it through Vietnam and Korea, which was still a very dangerous place with a nightly nation-wide curfew when I was there in the early 60's, without a scratch. I was working at the Pentagon on 9/11 and the blast rocked my chair. If you see a tall guy in a white hard hat walking around in the smoke that was me. I sent all the contractors home right after the blast but stayed around to do what I could for the First Responds until midnight. So I feel lucky for a lot of reasons.

But I can't stretch my little finger sideways at all. Either I get it over the string and drop is down or it is no good. So it can't make any stretch to a fourth fret and full bar major chords are becoming a problem too. And on most chords I actually have the side of the little finger on the string. So more and more chords are becoming impossible it seems like each day. They tell me I could lose the little finger completely in a few year. So I keep looking for different ways to play some chords. And I am just beginning to learn the almost unlimited ways you can play some jazz and triad chords.

I would like a Blues Jr too. Maybe one day I will pick one up. I have exhausted my desire to buy new guitars and love the ones I have. Like I think I said, they will all go to my kids, one already has. I promised them each an amp too. All the ones I have are solid state and I will probably buy a Blues Jr III some day just to try one tube amp before I die.

I really can't play well enough to solo on any tune. I have really limited dexterity in my left hand. But I am still a fair singer and love the sound of the jazz guitars even with my limited finger picking.

 

So what are the seven guitars you have now?

Good talking with you! Scott :)

 

Gibson LP Standard Gold Top, Gretsch Streamliner with V tail bar, Epiphone Custom Pro Limited Edition Pelham blue, Squire Vintage modified Jaguar, Ovation Celebrity with Koa top, Yamaha FG820, a OscarSchmidt OG2N Acoustic but I need to repair the bridge and I gave a Epiphone Black Standard to my son for the Custom Pro. He was going to sell it. He hasn't touched it in over a year. He plays sax, not guitars so I'm teaching his kids to play guitar. Grayson is 4 and I started with him at one. Reagan just turned 2 and I'm also teaching her to play. They will get my guitars. I'm also a collector of guns and my son will get them all and passed down to Grayson. I have some expensive Chess sets, as I used to collect those and played in tournaments. Yeah, I'm no stranger to bodily discomforts, At 16 I nearly cut my left arm off and should have bled out before I got to the hospital. The bone is the only thing that was still attached. Took over 300 stitches and the nerve to the thumb was lost. The wife calls me a cat with 9 lives. I won't get into all the rest. But I quit playing for a long period due to that. So hang in there and keep playing for as long as you can! There are lots of folks here that share physical disabilities and play.

 

 

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I did not know the Railroad business was so dangerous. I am glad you made it through. I know I always feel lucky to have made it through Vietnam and Korea, which was still a very dangerous place with a nightly nation-wide curfew when I was there in the early 60's, without a scratch. I was working at the Pentagon on 9/11 and the blast rocked my chair. If you see a tall guy in a white hard hat walking around in the smoke that was me. I sent all the contractors home right after the blast but stayed around to do what I could for the First Responds until midnight. So I feel lucky for a lot of reasons.

But I can't stretch my little finger sideways at all. Either I get it over the string and drop is down or it is no good. So it can't make any stretch to a fourth fret and full bar major chords are becoming a problem too. And on most chords I actually have the side of the little finger on the string. So more and more chords are becoming impossible it seems like each day. They tell me I could lose the little finger completely in a few year. So I keep looking for different ways to play some chords. And I am just beginning to learn the almost unlimited ways you can play some jazz and triad chords.

I would like a Blues Jr too. Maybe one day I will pick one up. I have exhausted my desire to buy new guitars and love the ones I have. Like I think I said, they will all go to my kids, one already has. I promised them each an amp too. All the ones I have are solid state and I will probably buy a Blues Jr III some day just to try one tube amp before I die.

I really can't play well enough to solo on any tune. I have really limited dexterity in my left hand. But I am still a fair singer and love the sound of the jazz guitars even with my limited finger picking.

 

So what are the seven guitars you have now?

Good talking with you! Scott :)

 

Gibson LP Standard Gold Top, Gretsch Streamliner with V tail bar, Epiphone Custom Pro Limited Edition Pelham blue, Squire Vintage modified Jaguar, Ovation Celebrity with Koa top, Yamaha FG820, a OscarSchmidt OG2N Acoustic but I need to repair the bridge and I gave a Epiphone Black Standard to my son for the Custom Pro. He was going to sell it. He hasn't touched it in over a year. He plays sax, not guitars so I'm teaching his kids to play guitar. Grayson is 4 and I started with him at one. Reagan just turned 2 and I'm also teaching her to play. They will get my guitars. I'm also a collector of guns and my son will get them all and passed down to Grayson. I have some expensive Chess sets, as I used to collect those and played in tournaments. Yeah, I'm no stranger to bodily discomforts, At 16 I nearly cut my left arm off and should have bled out before I got to the hospital. The bone is the only thing that was still attached. Took over 300 stitches and the nerve to the thumb was lost. The wife calls me a cat with 9 lives. I won't get into all the rest. But I quit playing for a long period due to that. So hang in there and keep playing for as long as you can! There are lots of folks here that share physical disabilities and play.

 

 

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