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J-45 historic question


Dallon426
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Alrighty. Been looking around on the net

And I have seen

The j-45 historic

J-45 reissue

J-45 True Vintage

J-45 vintage

J-45 legend

 

Are there anymore models I'm not aware of that are vintage recreations?

With the old golden Gibson script or banner logo? Thank you!

 

Also does anyone know of any sites or anything on the entire lines of j-45's that were released?

Edited by Dallon426
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Also does anyone know of any sites or anything on the entire lines of j-45's that were released?

A “partial” count was put together by OlWilyFool over four years ago- several more have been added since:

 

1.GIbson J-45 Classic

2.GIbson J-45 Modern

3.GIbson J-45 Custom

4.GIbson J-45 True Vintage

5.GIbson J-45 Pro

6.GIbson J-45 Artist

7.GIbson J-45 New Vintage

8.GIbson J-45 American

9.GIbson J-45 Legend

10.GIbson J-45 Studio

11.GIbson J-45 Pre-war

12. GIbson J-45 Deluxe

13. GIbson J-45 Limited

14. GIbson J-45 Mahogany top

15. GIbson J-45 Studio reissue

16. GIbson J-45 Custom Koa

17. GIbson J-45 Custom Maple

18. GIbson J-45 Custom Rosewood

19. GIbson J-45 Long scale

20. GIbson J-45 Antique Natural

21. GIbson J-45 LTD 1960'S J-45 ,Ebony Black

22. GIbson J-45 LTD 1968 J-45 ,Cherry Red Finish

23. Gibson J-45 - Wine Red

24. Gibson J-45 - Vintage Sunburst

25.Gibson J-45 Cobraburst

26. Gibson J-45 Amberburst

27. Gibson J-45 Red Spruce Sunsetburst

28. Gibson J-45 Historic collection

29. Gibson Brad Paisley Signature J-45

30. Gibson John Hiatt Signature J-45

31. Gibson J-45 Celebrity

32. Gibson J-45 Reissue

33. Gibson J-45 Dwight Yoakam Honky Tonk Deuce

34. Gibson J-45 Custom Vine Rosewood

35. Gibson J-45 Reissue Historic

36. Gibson J-45 V.O.S.

37. Gibson J-45 Pure voice

38. Gibson J-45 Koa Maui Wowie

39. Gibson Standard CST J45 Madagascar Rosewood

40. Gibson J-45 Western

41. Gibson J-45 Modern Classic

42. Gibson J-45 Gold top

43. Gibson J-45 Brazilian

44. Gibson J-45 Flamed Maple LTD

45. Gibson J-45 Mystic Rosewood

46. Gibson Kazuyoshi Saito signature J-45

47. Gibson J-45 Banner WWII

48. Gibson J-45 Iced Tea

49. Gibson J-45 Wine Red

50. Gibson J-45 Flamed Maple

51. Gibson J-45 Custom Mystic Rosewood

52. Gibson J-45 Deluxe Lefty

53. Gibson J-45 Vine Koa

54. Gibson J-45 1960's Ebony

55. Gibson J-45 1960's Ebony Lyric

56. Gibson J-45 Wine Red

57. Gibson J-45 Standard

58. Gibson J-45 Vine

59. Gibson J-45 Limited Edition Pelham Blue

60. Gibson J-45 Modern Classic

61. Gibson J-45 Rosewood

62. Gibson J-45 "J-45"

63. Gibson J-45 1942

64. Gibson J-45 Koa Elite

65. Gibson J-45 1963 Limited Edition

66. Gibson J-45 Limited Edition Navy Blue

67. Gibson J-45 Working Man

68. Gibson J-45 Antique Natural Mahogany Top Limited Edition

69. Gibson J-45 Standard Cherry

70. Gibson J-45 Donovan 1965

71. Gibson J-45 Brown Top

72. Gibson J-45 Ltd. White

73. Gibson J-45 Zebra Wood

74. Gibson J-45 Early

75. Gibson J-45 Buddy Holly

76. Gibson J-45 Mellow Yellow

77. Gibson J-45 '65 Natural Top

 

As of 2014.

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The list above is a good starting point.

 

There were apparently 670 J-45 Historic Collection guitars made for Guitar Center in 2005 or thereabouts. They are more vintage-esque or vintage-ish than recreations of historic instruments. The J-45HC was essentially the plain old, standard version, generic J-45 as Gibson made them that year, but with a "Historic Collection" decal on the back of the headstock. They had Sitka spruce tops, EIRW bridge and fingerboard, Tusq nut and saddle, Gotoh Kluson-clone tuners, Fishman Matrix Natural pickup, 20-fret fingerboard that covers part of the rosette, which in turn is (along with the soundhole) closer to the neck because of Ren Ferguson's change of the bracing angle to 98 from 103 degrees or so, and a badly-placed pickguard that covers another quarter of the rosette - if you gently peel it off with a skinny flatpick and/or dental floss, clean it with naptha and reinstall it with the double-sided 3M pickguard film it will line up correctly just outside the rosette like the old ones.

 

Mine has a nut width that is 1.704-in according to my Harbor Freight digital calipers. The neck carve matches my memory of my 1960 LG-2, which remains the only guitar I ever let go of that I really miss. I used to say that the tone is ENOUGH like my memory of my long-gone 1950 J-45 to satisfy me, but then I got to play that '50 J-45 again a couple of years ago and realized - I like the HC BETTER. More flexible, breathier, just a nicer sounding and playing guitar. The Fishman Matrix Natural pickup sounds pretty good when played with bare fingers, which eliminates the piezo quack. You can hear it amplified and au natural if you go here, but you'll want to crank it up and earbuds or headphones will probably yield the best results.

 

I may yet acquire another LG-2 someday, but that would be to augment, not to replace this J-45.

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A “partial” count was put together by OlWilyFool over four years ago- several more have been added since:

 

1.GIbson J-45 Classic

2.GIbson J-45 Modern

3.GIbson J-45 Custom

4.GIbson J-45 True Vintage

5.GIbson J-45 Pro

6.GIbson J-45 Artist

7.GIbson J-45 New Vintage

8.GIbson J-45 American

9.GIbson J-45 Legend

10.GIbson J-45 Studio

11.GIbson J-45 Pre-war

12. GIbson J-45 Deluxe

13. GIbson J-45 Limited

14. GIbson J-45 Mahogany top

15. GIbson J-45 Studio reissue

16. GIbson J-45 Custom Koa

17. GIbson J-45 Custom Maple

18. GIbson J-45 Custom Rosewood

19. GIbson J-45 Long scale

20. GIbson J-45 Antique Natural

21. GIbson J-45 LTD 1960'S J-45 ,Ebony Black

22. GIbson J-45 LTD 1968 J-45 ,Cherry Red Finish

23. Gibson J-45 - Wine Red

24. Gibson J-45 - Vintage Sunburst

25.Gibson J-45 Cobraburst

26. Gibson J-45 Amberburst

27. Gibson J-45 Red Spruce Sunsetburst

28. Gibson J-45 Historic collection

29. Gibson Brad Paisley Signature J-45

30. Gibson John Hiatt Signature J-45

31. Gibson J-45 Celebrity

32. Gibson J-45 Reissue

33. Gibson J-45 Dwight Yoakam Honky Tonk Deuce

34. Gibson J-45 Custom Vine Rosewood

35. Gibson J-45 Reissue Historic

36. Gibson J-45 V.O.S.

37. Gibson J-45 Pure voice

38. Gibson J-45 Koa Maui Wowie

39. Gibson Standard CST J45 Madagascar Rosewood

40. Gibson J-45 Western

41. Gibson J-45 Modern Classic

42. Gibson J-45 Gold top

43. Gibson J-45 Brazilian

44. Gibson J-45 Flamed Maple LTD

45. Gibson J-45 Mystic Rosewood

46. Gibson Kazuyoshi Saito signature J-45

47. Gibson J-45 Banner WWII

48. Gibson J-45 Iced Tea

49. Gibson J-45 Wine Red

50. Gibson J-45 Flamed Maple

51. Gibson J-45 Custom Mystic Rosewood

52. Gibson J-45 Deluxe Lefty

53. Gibson J-45 Vine Koa

54. Gibson J-45 1960's Ebony

55. Gibson J-45 1960's Ebony Lyric

56. Gibson J-45 Wine Red

57. Gibson J-45 Standard

58. Gibson J-45 Vine

59. Gibson J-45 Limited Edition Pelham Blue

60. Gibson J-45 Modern Classic

61. Gibson J-45 Rosewood

62. Gibson J-45 "J-45"

63. Gibson J-45 1942

64. Gibson J-45 Koa Elite

65. Gibson J-45 1963 Limited Edition

66. Gibson J-45 Limited Edition Navy Blue

67. Gibson J-45 Working Man

68. Gibson J-45 Antique Natural Mahogany Top Limited Edition

69. Gibson J-45 Standard Cherry

70. Gibson J-45 Donovan 1965

71. Gibson J-45 Brown Top

72. Gibson J-45 Ltd. White

73. Gibson J-45 Zebra Wood

74. Gibson J-45 Early

75. Gibson J-45 Buddy Holly

76. Gibson J-45 Mellow Yellow

77. Gibson J-45 '65 Natural Top

 

As of 2014.

thats a lot of 45s !

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Strangely enough, my acquaintance with Gibson acoustics is only very recent, even after 50 years of owning countless guitars. There is a lady in her 80's who is at my jam every week who plays a 1962 J45 her late husband bought new for her. As soon as she arrives she asks me to tune it up for her. I usually say "why AnnaLou, I know it's still in tune from last week!" and I'm usually right. I can still remember the first time I briefly played it after tuning it up. The POWER and presence I felt rumbling through the back of that guitar against me was incredible. The finish on the neck is almost completely worn away from decades of player wear. It has a sound that should be reserved for the gods. A few weeks ago I said "AnnaLou, would you like to start over with a newer Gibson? I'll trade ya this 2016 AJ even up for the J45". She said she was too old now to start over. Of course, if she had taken me up on it (I wasn't serious)I would have had a moment of pause to decide if I COULD part with my AJ which has become my favorite guitar of my lifetime. Coincidentally, she said her husband and his brother bought two J45's the same day. The other was for her sister in law. She said the other one never ended up sounding as good as hers and it was probably played as much, if not more than AnnaLou played hers. But I digress. I'm not remotely answering anything asked in this thread. Sorry, I just wanted to throw this out there.

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Strangely enough, my acquaintance with Gibson acoustics is only very recent, even after 50 years of owning countless guitars. There is a lady in her 80's who is at my jam every week who plays a 1962 J45 her late husband bought new for her. As soon as she arrives she asks me to tune it up for her. I usually say "why AnnaLou, I know it's still in tune from last week!" and I'm usually right. I can still remember the first time I briefly played it after tuning it up. The POWER and presence I felt rumbling through the back of that guitar against me was incredible. The finish on the neck is almost completely worn away from decades of player wear. It has a sound that should be reserved for the gods. A few weeks ago I said "AnnaLou, would you like to start over with a newer Gibson? I'll trade ya this 2016 AJ even up for the J45". She said she was too old now to start over. Of course, if she had taken me up on it (I wasn't serious)I would have had a moment of pause to decide if I COULD part with my AJ which has become my favorite guitar of my lifetime. Coincidentally, she said her husband and his brother bought two J45's the same day. The other was for her sister in law. She said the other one never ended up sounding as good as hers and it was probably played as much, if not more than AnnaLou played hers. But I digress. I'm not remotely answering anything asked in this thread. Sorry, I just wanted to throw this out there.

 

 

If you get a chance, check the serial number on the '62 so we can confirm that it is actually a '62 and not something a bit earlier. It wasn't unusual back then for guitars to sit on a shelf in the store for some time before they were sold, and memories can fade over time.

 

If you really like the guitar, you should try to make an arrangement with the lady so that you can buy it when and if she stops playing it.

 

Not to be morbid about this, but a lot of fine guitars that have always been in families get sold off for nothing when estates are settled after the owner dies. You don't want that to happen to this one if you really like it. Getting a guitar from an old acquaintance has a real charm about it.

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If you get a chance, check the serial number on the '62 so we can confirm that it is actually a '62 and not something a bit earlier. It wasn't unusual back then for guitars to sit on a shelf in the store for some time before they were sold, and memories can fade over time.

 

If you really like the guitar, you should try to make an arrangement with the lady so that you can buy it when and if she stops playing it.

 

Not to be morbid about this, but a lot of fine guitars that have always been in families get sold off for nothing when estates are settled after the owner dies. You don't want that to happen to this one if you really like it. Getting a guitar from an old acquaintance has a real charm about it.

 

I hear ya. I wrote a song about AnnaLou and this old guitar I occasionally play at the jam. She's very proud of the song. Her elderly sister stopped by my house one day to tell me AnnaLou never stops telling people about the song I wrote for her. I borrowed her guitar the last time I played the song and she just sat there beaming the whole time. I have another guitar I inherited from a good friend who passed last year. Unfortunately, the one of a kind guitar he directly commissioned the build of was very badly crushed in a serious guitar accident in June of this year. I'm awaiting the hefty settlement that's coming my way so I can send it off to a highly qualified restoration expert to make it a survivor. AnnaLou is going downhill fast with bad heart issues. I've often wondered where her guitar will end up when she passes. Her sister I learned lives right down a country road from me. I intend to at least make them aware of what the guitar is worth when the time comes so it doesn't leave their family for less money. Maybe by then I'll have my settlement and can buy it. The at fault driver in my car wreck's insurance compensated me $3,000 for the damaged guitar in my car wreck. I wasn't going to argue about the remaining $500 of the appraisal I had for it. I was able to get another of my deceased friend's guitars from his collection and give my wife the rest of the money for a down payment on a replacement car for her new Explorer she'd only had a month.

Edited by DaveKell
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Despite the Banner or script logo, the only one that I think is a a "recreation" of a vintage J-45 is the Legend. The others are more "inspired by" (to borrow an Epi designation), There were, however, short runs such as thee 2013 issues of Banners based on originals provided by JT. Not saying they are not fine guitars but spot on reproductions from guitars in a past catalog they are generally not.

Edited by zombywoof
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I too run a folk, folk rock, country, bluegrass music jam and have run across some real finds that an elderly musician owns or that they or a family member inherited. I ALWAYS tell them the high value and collectability of their instrument and advise them to always take the necessary steps to retain the instrument as well as to fill their relatives in on its value and collectability so they do not get fleeced now or at a later date. I also provide them names of resource books (The Vintage Guitar Guide) as well the names of reliable places to consult with about the value of their instrument (Elderly, Gruhn Guitars.) The elderly owner or their family members are always very grateful to know that as a member of the jam community that I host, that I have their best interests in mind.

 

QM aka Jazzman Jeff

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And if you are straight with them, they will often bring the guitar to you for first refusal when they decide to part with it.

 

 

I've told the story before of finding a little rosewood 0 or 00 sized slothead "New Yorker" (from about 1870) with the headstock separated from the neck, behind a chair in the living room of a little old lady when the group I worked with was on the college coffee house circuit in Ohio almost 50 years ago. She had meant to throw it out, and had forgotten it. I told her what it was, and hand-delivered it to Martin for restoration when we were on our way back to NYC after that tour.

 

Martin wouldn't touch it (I bet they would now), but I found a superb Martin restoration specialist to put it back together, sold it to a lady in New York through an ad in the NY Times, and sent the little old lady in Ohio a nice check. Made me feel pretty good, actually.

 

That was when I learned that the headstock on Martins back then was a separate component from the neck, and that the birds beak originally was actually part of the joint, rather than the vestigial element it is with todays one-piece neck.

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Strangely enough, my acquaintance with Gibson acoustics is only very recent, even after 50 years of owning countless guitars. There is a lady in her 80's who is at my jam every week who plays a 1962 J45 her late husband bought new for her. As soon as she arrives she asks me to tune it up for her. I usually say "why AnnaLou, I know it's still in tune from last week!" and I'm usually right. I can still remember the first time I briefly played it after tuning it up. The POWER and presence I felt rumbling through the back of that guitar against me was incredible. The finish on the neck is almost completely worn away from decades of player wear. It has a sound that should be reserved for the gods. A few weeks ago I said "AnnaLou, would you like to start over with a newer Gibson? I'll trade ya this 2016 AJ even up for the J45". She said she was too old now to start over. Of course, if she had taken me up on it (I wasn't serious)I would have had a moment of pause to decide if I COULD part with my AJ which has become my favorite guitar of my lifetime. Coincidentally, she said her husband and his brother bought two J45's the same day. The other was for her sister in law. She said the other one never ended up sounding as good as hers and it was probably played as much, if not more than AnnaLou played hers. But I digress. I'm not remotely answering anything asked in this thread. Sorry, I just wanted to throw this out there.

 

 

Cool story! Nice!

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