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Henrryparth

Why are modern Gibson Standard/Traditional/Classic/Studio guitars so glossy and plasticy looking despite being nitro finished?

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Has anyone else noticed this? People like to **** on polyurethane for being so glossy and plasticky and to be fair it definitely is, but modern Gibson guitars look just as toy-like as poly finished guitars from my experience. Only the VOS finished guitars look like real nitro (shiny, but slightly dull/hazy.)

Old Gibsons look very nice, but all the modern glossy Standard/Traditional/Studio guitars look just as bad as Epiphone guitars.The reason I'm bringing this up is because I was looking to upgrade from my Epiphone to a Gibson Les Paul Standard and one of the features I was most excited about was the nitro finish, but when I saw it at my local guitar shop it looked identical to my current Epiphone. It felt the same more or less too (talking about the finish.)It was extremely shiny, glossy and reflections distorted in all kinds of weird ways in the finish just like on my Epiphone.

My local guitar shop doesn't seem to have any VOS guitars so I'll have to order online unfortunately.

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That's because of a couple things. First, they use hardeners in the lacquer for a more durable finish, and probably faster hardening as well. Those are polymers. Second, the modern Gibson have a much thicker finish. Historic models are the exception.

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Has anyone else noticed this? People like to **** on polyurethane for being so glossy and plasticky and to be fair it definitely is, but modern Gibson guitars look just as toy-like as poly finished guitars from my experience. Only the VOS finished guitars look like real nitro (shiny, but slightly dull/hazy.)

Old Gibsons look very nice, but all the modern glossy Standard/Traditional/Studio guitars look just as bad as Epiphone guitars.The reason I'm bringing this up is because I was looking to upgrade from my Epiphone to a Gibson Les Paul Standard and one of the features I was most excited about was the nitro finish, but when I saw it at my local guitar shop it looked identical to my current Epiphone. It felt the same more or less too (talking about the finish.)It was extremely shiny, glossy and reflections distorted in all kinds of weird ways in the finish just like on my Epiphone.

My local guitar shop doesn't seem to have any VOS guitars so I'll have to order online unfortunately.

Any Updates?

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My 2009 ES-345 in walnut looked plastic and shiny when new now it has a lovely, well used patina. No chips, nicks or cracks but with a bit of wear on the gold it's beautiful and it was not a VOS model. My L-4CES is coming along well also.

Thanks John

Edited by powerwagonjohn

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That's because of a couple things. First, they use hardeners in the lacquer for a more durable finish, and probably faster hardening as well. Those are polymers. Second, the modern Gibson have a much thicker finish. Historic models are the exception.

 

Also, they're not 50+ years old either.....

Edited by Larsongs

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Also, they're not 50+ years old either.....

 

That's definitely true for vintage guitars, but even a brand new historic RI gloss finish looks very different than a new USA guitar.

 

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That's definitely true for vintage guitars, but even a brand new historic RI gloss finish looks very different than a new USA guitar.

 

Purposely done to give the appearance of Vintage or Relic... Usually costs extra!

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Purposely done to give the appearance of Vintage or Relic... Usually costs extra!

 

That is entirely the point of a historic replica. Yes, they do cost more.

 

 

 

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That is entirely the point of a historic replica. Yes, they do cost more.

 

This is what Gibson says on their 2018 CHLP's.... Gloss or Vintage Patina.....

 

Quote,

 

1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson's mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world's greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom's 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that's just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic '59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original. Available in four beautiful sunburst variations in Gloss or VOS (vintage patina, shown) finishes. Left-handed models available as well.

Edited by Larsongs

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This is what Gibson says on their 2018 CHLP's.... Gloss or Vintage Patina.....

 

Quote,

 

1959 is widely considered to be the pinnacle year for Gibson's mid-century solid body electric guitars, and no 1959 Gibson model is more famous than the sunburst Les Paul Standard. At first a commercial failure, the model was eventually adopted by some the world's greatest guitarists – Jimmy Page, Duane Allman, Mike Bloomfield, Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, and Billy Gibbons, to name a few. The rarity and celebrity association of the model has pushed the values of original examples into the stratosphere. Gibson Custom's 1959 Les Paul Standard is a painstakingly-accurate replica of these highly-valuable guitars rendered in detail so intricate that even the chemical composition of the parts has been scientifically examined and re-engineered – and that's just one small example. Sonically, visually, and tactilely, owning a 2018 Gibson Custom Historic '59 Les Paul Standard is as close as one can get to owning a priceless original. Available in four beautiful sunburst variations in Gloss or VOS (vintage patina, shown) finishes. Left-handed models available as well.

 

All true. I'm not sure what your point is but my point is that the RI gloss finish is not the same as the USA/non-historic gloss finish. Then, they do have the VOS finish and beyond that they offer the Murphy aged finish. The price for gloss and VOS is the same these days. Murphy aged costs more.

Edited by Black Dog

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All true. I'm not sure what your point is but my point is that the RI gloss finish is not the same as the USA/non-historic gloss finish. Then, they do have the VOS finish and beyond that they offer the Murphy aged finish. The price for gloss and VOS is the same these days. Murphy aged costs more.

 

Only point is I bet those are fabulous Guitars! I can't imagine much better than my Memphis ES335 & my Memphis Blacktop ES Les Paul Bigsby & MHS on both but I'd sure like to try them out!

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