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E-minor7

1965 blonde Bird

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Another extremely well-kept Hummingbird from Mark and Norman's.

All very fine and this guy not only plays better and better, he also has become a finer test-rider - especially after softening the first half of the demonstrations down.

 

But, , , and I realize this may get embarrassing : Which tunes are featured here ?

They sound like classics and I'm sure I know them - just can't get titles lit up on the hard-disc.

 

 

 

1965 ~ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEYL8TpLM44

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It was in the YT comments by Mike M: Little Martha by Duane Allman. Then the Glimmer Twins, "You can't always get. . ."

 

 

Mark always flings open those cases so hard.

Edited by 62burst

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God I love that guitar. Something about 50+ year old mahogany and that ceramic saddle that just appeals to me. I had the chance to play a 1962 (believe that was the year) j45 at Lowe's Vintage and it hit me the same way. Went home to think about it and by time I checked back it was gone. That's how it gone.

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The songs featured are:

 

1)Sweet Black Angel

 

2) Sweet Virginia

 

Both Stones Tunes (Mark is a RS and KR Fan)

 

 

Edit: Whoops ... I thought you werw talking about todays 1965 blonde bird:

 

 

 

 

JC

Edited by JuanCarlosVejar

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That is a grear sounding Hummingbird. When i hear or play an early to mid 60s HB i really find it hard to go back to my 2011 HB TV. There really is a significant difference in tone quality with that aged wood. The level of saturated mids and that bottom end thump just can’t be recreated.

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He..."The Rolling Stones, Exile On Main Street, have you heard of them? Have you heard of that work?"

 

She... "I don't think so"....

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That is a grear sounding Hummingbird. When i hear or play an early to mid 60s HB i really find it hard to go back to my 2011 HB TV. There really is a significant difference in tone quality with that aged wood. The level of saturated mids and that bottom end thump just can’t be recreated.

 

 

That is because Gibson has yet to offer a 1960s RI with the un-scalloped bracing. The post-1955 slope shoulder guitars tend to give up a bit on the low end but make up for it by being be punchy and quick. The problem, of course, is that Gibson did not start building a square shoulder guitar until the Epi Frontier in 1958 so there is nothing to compare them to.

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I have two Birds that don't get to come out of their cases too often, but that one moved me a hair. Wonder what they are recording through?

Edited by Hall

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He..."The Rolling Stones, Exile On Main Street, have you heard of them? Have you heard of that work?"

 

She... "I don't think so"....

 

 

Makes you feel old, doesn't it?

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It was in the YT comments by Mike M: Little Martha by Duane Allman. Then the Glimmer Twins, "You can't always get. . ."

 

Mark always flings open those cases so hard.

Have to say I heard an imaginary french horn while listening, , , but I need to get this Martha out on a date. Guess she's quite hard to conquer.

 

God I love that guitar. Something about 50+ year old mahogany and that ceramic saddle that just appeals to me.

Same here - and luckily more and more people (including mister Mark) seem to understand the porcelain-virtue.

Would be sad to them all 'fixed' beyond rewind.

 

That is a grear sounding Hummingbird. When i hear or play an early to mid 60s HB i really find it hard to go back to my 2011 HB TV. There really is a significant difference in tone quality with that aged wood. The level of saturated mids and that bottom end thump just can't be recreated.

You gotta have one of each. Play all my variations a lot, , , and wouldn't like to be without the strength of the 2012s.

 

Edit: Whoops ... I thought you werw talking about todays 1965 blonde bird:

 

Hadn't heard that one yet - thx for catching up.

He should have capoed the second or strummed a few bars without on the first so we could compare these 65ers 1 to 1.

Still I hear them pretty similar.

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Have to say I heard an imaginary french horn while listening, , , but I need to get this Martha out on a date. Guess she's quite hard to conquer.

 

 

Same here - and luckily more and more people (including mister Mark) seem to understand the porcelain-virtue.

Would be sad to them all 'fixed' beyond rewind.

 

 

You gotta have one of each. Play all my variations a lot, , , and wouldn't like to be without the strength of the 2012s.

 

 

 

Hadn't heard that one yet - thx for catching up.

He should have capoed the second or strummed a few bars without on the first so we could compare these 65ers 1 to 1.

Still I hear them pretty similar.

 

What do you mean by 'strength' of the 2012 Em7 ?

Edited by EuroAussie

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If there was an award give for the greatest rock& roll acoustic it would have to come down to the Gibson Hummingbird and the Harmony Sovereign (both the 1260 and 1270 12 string). A runner up would be the Gibson J-200. Keith used a Sovereign 1270 on the early Stones recordings such as Not Fade Away, Tell Me and Tears Go by. Townsend also used a Sovereign on the Who Sell Out and Tommy (along with a Gibson J-200) while Page worked out many of the Led Zep songs and recorded Stairway with one. The association of the HB with the Stones goes back to 1965 during the Aftermath recording sessions.

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What do you mean by 'strength' of the 2012 Em7 ?

My 2 2012 True Vintage Birds (April and May) are quite different. M is sweeter and more birdish, A is straight-forward-big.

Worth mentioning that A has a taller bridge and some would see a logic there.

 

However I tend to find both guitars stronger than my vintage models. Not necessarily volume-wise, but regarding overall nature.

The square hog Gibsons has a tendency toward somewhat thinner highs than fx the slopes - it's a part of their delicate side.

It comes across in both vintage and contemporary - which as you say are like 2 versions of the same thing - but all in all the oldies are a bit more fragile, thus the 'thinnest'.

 

When I say strength I mean robust - not talkin' about the force as an instrument or artistic/spiritual tool.

The newer not all dried out wood adds to that - perhaps also the bulkier (though scalloped) braces and other factors.

I generally find this difference between new and old Gibsons (also other brands).

The first have, , , well a modern fresh strength to them - the veterans are slightly more vulnerable and sensitive.

 

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That is because Gibson has yet to offer a 1960s RI with the un-scalloped bracing. The post-1955 slope shoulder guitars tend to give up a bit on the low end but make up for it by being be punchy and quick. The problem, of course, is that Gibson did not start building a square shoulder guitar until the Epi Frontier in 1958 so there is nothing to compare them to.

 

I might get killed for saying this but my favorite Gibsons are their 60’s maple acoustics along with the Epi Frontier.I like the fact that they are not in your face .

 

I obviously admire the prewar stuff too.But those are too sophisticated for my playing.I like the primal/caveman thing Gibson had going on in their 60’s acoustic.Unrefined .

 

 

 

 

JC

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I might get killed for saying this but my favorite Gibsons are their 60’s maple acoustics along with the Epi Frontier.I like the fact that they are not in your face .

 

I obviously admire the prewar stuff too.But those are too sophisticated for my playing.I like the primal/caveman thing Gibson had going on in their 60’s acoustic.Unrefined .

 

 

 

 

JC

 

Then you would love the last of the pre-Gibson Epis. Both the FT-110 and FT-79 had arched maple backs. The guitar I own that remains the one that it seems most players are trying to buy off me is my 1955/56 FT-79. In fact, just two days ago somebody played it and offered me cash on the spot for it. Problem is, it is not for sale.

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Guess I'm int he minority but I'm not digging the sound. Maybe it's the way they recorded it, or maybe that's just the way Hummingbirds sound, and why I've never been drawn to them. All clack and attack. That and the narrow nut and price this thing is most likely going for make it even less attractive.

Edited by sbpark

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All clack and attack.

Well, it seems like you're bound to get a whole lot of clack & attack when you capo up into the stratosphere & then wham it with a pick!

 

Quite a different story with the fingerstyle work.

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