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JustStrummin

AJ-220S with leaning saddle

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I just received a "like new" AJ-220S. Seems like a great guitar for the money, however, the saddle leans backwards towards the pins more than I have seen on any other guitar. Is this the way the AJ-220S' bridge/saddle was designed? I would be more concerned if it leaned forward towards the fretboard, but it seems to be a good 10 degrees off of perpendicular. And the compensation at the top edge of the saddle makes it look like it is leaning even more.

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My first question is if the saddle fits relatively snug into the bridge’s indentation for the saddle. You may need to fully loosen the strings to find out. Or, even take the strings off. If it fits relatively snug in the indentation and the strings’ intonation is fine, it’s just how the guitar is made in my opinion and I wouldn’t worry a bit about it. If, however, the saddle is very loose in the bridge’s indentation, so that it can lean either forward or backward, then I’d recommend a new saddle be made that fits snug into the bridge’s indentation.

 

A good luthier can carve a new tighter saddle if needed.

 

Or, you can try doing one if you are up to it.

 

If the existing saddle fits and the guitar intones well no worries. If it fits good does not intone well, you should contact the seller for advise, explaining the matter, to see what is said about fixing or exchanging it.

 

If the seller won’t help, a good luthier should be able to recut the bridge’s indentation, although it may require a thicker saddle be cut.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Let us know the outcome.

 

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

Edited by QuestionMark

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My first question is if the saddle fits relatively snug into the bridge’s indentation for the saddle. You may need to fully loosen the strings to find out. Or, even take the strings off. If it fits relatively snug in the indentation and the strings’ intonation is fine, it’s just how the guitar is made in my opinion and I wouldn’t worry a bit about it. If, however, the saddle is very loose in the bridge’s indentation, so that it can lean either forward or backward, then I’d recommend a new saddle be made that fits snug into the bridge’s indentation.

 

A good luthier can carve a new tighter saddle if needed.

 

Or, you can try doing one if you are up to it.

 

If the existing saddle fits and the guitar intones well no worries. If it fits good does not intone well, you should contact the seller for advise, explaining the matter, to see what is said about fixing or exchanging it.

 

If the seller won’t help, a good luthier should be able to recut the bridge’s indentation, although it may require a thicker saddle be cut.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Let us know the outcome.

 

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

 

Thanks for the reply Jazzman. The saddle fits snugggly - I've read you should be able to turn the guitar with the hole facing down without the strings on, and the saddle should not fall out of the slot. In fact, I replaced the original saddle that was quite loose fitting (and too low) with a new Tusq saddle. I think because the original saddle was so short, I didn't notice the lean so much. Now that it's taller, the lean is more noticeable. It plays well, has good intonation, and seems to stay in tune perfectly. I'll take your advice and not worry about. Ron

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