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E-minor7

Time for a strange Bird

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Oh sure, it’s ok for Gibson to come up with this sort of bizarreness, but I put a shrunken head at the headstock and a pork chop for a pick guard, and the style police are all over me.

 

Are there many square 160’s out there? The model is easier on the eyes in slope form. The Epi EJ-200 style “filled in” bridge, while correct for ‘200’s of the era, only adds an extra layer of cheese.

 

Nice burst, and the Steve Earle connection reconciles things a bit.

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Nice, but I'd have to have quite a few other guitars before I was ready to drop $7500 on that duckling. I do like the cutaway though.

Edited by billroy

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So did the J-160e go from Round to Square and back earlier than the J-45? In it's earlier form (mid '50's to early '60's?), it seemed to look more like a J-45, but with the fretboard bumped out to make room for the P-90, giving 15 frets clear of the body. Looked similar, but the ladder bracing and plywood...

 

The body of the CFcutawayflorentine-1000eSJ-160e in the OP seems to take it's shape from the Country (and) Western and the Hummingbird, c. 1965. Shown to the left of it is a '67 J-160e on Denmark St:

 

gbBRFEp.png?1

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Are there many square 160's out there?

Don't seem to be many out there. But McCartney had to one with him to Scotland in the wake of the break-up.

That guitar still exists.

 

So did the J-160e go from Round to Square and back earlier than the J-45? In it's earlier form (mid '50's to early '60's?), it seemed to look more like a J-45, but with the fretboard bumped out to make room for the P-90, giving 15 frets clear of the body. Looked similar, but the ladder bracing and plywood...

 

The body of the CFcutawayflorentine-1000eSJ-160e in the OP seems to take it's shape from the Country (and) Western and the Hummingbird, c. 1965. Shown to the left of it is a '67 J-160e on Denmark St:

 

gbBRFEp.png?1

Guess they remained plywood-topped and ladder-braced after the square turn.

Not sure, know nothing, , , except that it's hard to see if they actually kept the extra 15th fret free before body start.

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How many other gems is Steve Earle hiding? 130 guitars? give me a break.

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From a collection of more than 130, this 1890s Martin 1-28 is Earle’s favorite instrument.

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