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Picked up a nice SJ200 Standard lately, and am currently trying out different string brands on the beast. This one is my second J200, previously I had a 1990 J200 Natural. 

This 'burst is an excellent sounding guitar, what I wanted but never quite managed to get from the '90.

I play fingerstyle mostly, haven't used a pick in years, but have been strumming this one and marvelling at the sound. 

ea3cff_92d0a3ff2cf34e77a50023387daa29dc~

 

Here's my Gaggle o' Gibsons (AKA Bevy o' Bursts) [smile]

ea3cff_0dc139e68ee64a63b74dc1b91c7638d9~

 

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Nice!  2-ribbon bridge......perfect!  I'd still have my Western Classic if I hadn't jumped off the long scale wagon.

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25 minutes ago, drathbun said:

Beauty! Welcome to the club!

Try try a set of 13 Sunbeams - sweet and robust

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I'm ready for the flames......I found that I really liked the sound of Elixir 80/20 lights on the J200 I had a few years ago. And I have not changed my opinion of them on my J200 I just bought a couple of weeks ago. Don't know how the guitar could sound any better.

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8 hours ago, Johnny3j said:

Picked up a nice SJ200 Standard lately....

 

Man, another SJ200 NGD!  Super major congrats!  Love the burst!

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Very nice, super nice burst and like the collection it's sitting with - gotta be a song or two in there somewhere!

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20 hours ago, Buc McMaster said:

Nice!  2-ribbon bridge......perfect!  I'd still have my Western Classic if I hadn't jumped off the long scale wagon.

 

Thanks! I'm curious, what models got the 4 ribbon bridge and why? Was it just build year dependant?

20 hours ago, Paul14 said:

Nice! When was it made?

It's a 2018 Standard.

20 hours ago, drathbun said:

Beauty! Welcome to the club!

Thanks!

20 hours ago, duluthdan said:

Try try a set of 13 Sunbeams - sweet and robust

I have a bunch of sets I'm planning to try, I'll add DR Sunbeams to the list.

19 hours ago, Joe M said:

I'm ready for the flames......I found that I really liked the sound of Elixir 80/20 lights on the J200 I had a few years ago. And I have not changed my opinion of them on my J200 I just bought a couple of weeks ago. Don't know how the guitar could sound any better.

Someone also mentioned coated strings over on AGF, I don't usually go for them, but I think I'll try them on this one.

19 hours ago, Hall said:

Well done.

 

12 hours ago, Cougar said:

 

Man, another SJ200 NGD!  Super major congrats!  Love the burst!

 

9 hours ago, kelly campbell said:

Beautiful...Enjoy it  Congrats.

 

4 hours ago, billroy said:

Very nice, super nice burst and like the collection it's sitting with - gotta be a song or two in there somewhere!

 

2 hours ago, kidblast said:

Very nice SJ200, (and gaggle O' Gibsons too)

 

 

Thanks guys!

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Mine is a 2000, but still my favorite out of a dozen acoustics. Love the burst on yours. Here’s to many years with a great guitar. Enjoy

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Beautifully photographed. 'Don't know what those other miscellaneous things are that it's sharing the bench with, but all the stars seem to be aligned in Dub Ham Ord. 

Congrats/Enjoy

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When you figure out the 4 ribbon thing let me know.

These are both custom shop but only one has the 4 ribbon.

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A four ribbon bridge requires that the pins be set farther from the saddle, making room for the extra ribbons.  This is very obvious in Daves' photo of his 200s.  Moving the pins away from the saddle reduces the string break angles.  With an overset neck a four ribbon is fine as it allows for a tall saddle, maintaining good angles over the saddle..  An average neck set can be troublesome with a four ribbon bridge.  For my eye, a two ribbon looks better anyway, but everyone sees with different eyes.

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On 7/4/2019 at 11:38 PM, Buc McMaster said:

A four ribbon bridge requires that the pins be set farther from the saddle, making room for the extra ribbons.  This is very obvious in Daves' photo of his 200s.  Moving the pins away from the saddle reduces the string break angles.  With an overset neck a four ribbon is fine as it allows for a tall saddle, maintaining good angles over the saddle..  An average neck set can be troublesome with a four ribbon bridge.  For my eye, a two ribbon looks better anyway, but everyone sees with different eyes.

My experience exactly. My old '03 SJ200 had a slightly underset neck and the four ribbon bridge made it nightmarishly difficult to set up properly. I remember your probs with the WC and having to have the neck planed etc...the four ribbon bridge is cosmetically pleasant but I'd take the two ribbon job on my 2015 any day of the week.

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3 hours ago, Jinder said:

My experience exactly. My old '03 SJ200 had a slightly underset neck and the four ribbon bridge made it nightmarishly difficult to set up properly. I remember your probs with the WC and having to have the neck planed etc...the four ribbon bridge is cosmetically pleasant but I'd take the two ribbon job on my 2015 any day of the week.

Man, those are a couple of terms I have NEVER heard....underset and overset when referring to guitar necks. Please elaborate, I'm really curious about the terms, even though I can kinda figure out what they mean.

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A neck set in the block at a relatively shallow angle is underset..........not too much difference between the plane of the fretboard and the guitar top.  This can make a low action setup difficult, if not impossible, depending on the degree of underset.   An overset neck has a steeper angle between these two planes.   Such geometry allows lots of room at the saddle for action adjustments, up or down.  The old straight-edge-on-the-board  check demonstrates both quite visually.........easier to understand seeing it than stating it.

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1 hour ago, Buc McMaster said:

A neck set in the block at a relatively shallow angle is underset..........not too much difference between the plane of the fretboard and the guitar top.  This can make a low action setup difficult, if not impossible, depending on the degree of underset.   An overset neck has a steeper angle between these two planes.   Such geometry allows lots of room at the saddle for action adjustments, up or down.  The old straight-edge-on-the-board  check demonstrates both quite visually.........easier to understand seeing it than stating it.

So I'm assuming neither would NOT be something that would be done on purpose, right?

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26 minutes ago, Joe M said:

.............something that would be done on purpose, right?

Not sure what you mean there, Joe.  But I do know that necksets vary much more than they should, particularly in instruments built with a lot of hand work.  To my thinking, the neckset is the single most important factor in how adjustable a guitars' setup can be.   I can think of no reason why a builder wouldn't take extra effort and care in make this joining of the body and neck perfect.......everytime.

 

And yes, Doug, I had ramps cut into the ribbons on my WC long ago.   I suppose some would wince at the thought, cutting the pearl, but it's a tool and priority one is playability.

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51 minutes ago, Buc McMaster said:

Not sure what you mean there, Joe.  But I do know that necksets vary much more than they should, particularly in instruments built with a lot of hand work.  To my thinking, the neckset is the single most important factor in how adjustable a guitars' setup can be.   I can think of no reason why a builder wouldn't take extra effort and care in make this joining of the body and neck perfect.......everytime.

 

And yes, Doug, I had ramps cut into the ribbons on my WC long ago.   I suppose some would wince at the thought, cutting the pearl, but it's a tool and priority one is playability.

Sorry, Buc, guess I wasn’t too clear. What I meant was, unless I’m misunderstanding the whole thing, why would a builder under or over set a neck, wouldn’t he want it perfect always, or at least as close to perfect as he could make it.  

Edited by Joe M

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