Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Morley


Boston004681

Recommended Posts

I bought a Morley wah back in the seventies when they first came out, big, shiny, AC powered, photo optic controled, way cool. It was the Power Wah Fuzz model that also functioned as a volume pedal when all else was off. I did not like the long "travel" of the pedal and eventually went back to my old Cry Baby (and traded the Morley off for a couple of 12" speakers).

 

The one thing it did do that is tough to get on a Cry Baby is the Zappa "Frozen Wah" sound.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Impossible for Hendrix to have ever used a Morley wah as the company didn't exist, or rather, wasn't called "Morley" until 1972 and Hendrix died in 1970.

 

From Analogman's Guide to Vintage Effects (Analogman):

 

Certainly' date=' some of the biggest effects of the seventies (in terms of size) were made by Morley. The chrome-plated [i']Power Seies[/i] was the Lincoln Town Car to the Hondas and Datsuns of Ibanez and Boss. Throughout the 1960's, Marvin and Raymond Lubow operated Tel-Ray Electronics. Their "Adineko" memory system had been sold under several different brands, such as Fender and Gibson. The Lubow brothers established a new brand name in the early seventies resulting in the Morley line of effects. Morely introduced their Slimline series in the early eighties, which offered additional features and a more practical size. In 1989, Marvin and Raymond sold Morely to Accutronics, makers of the Accutronics Type 4 spring reverb (formerly Hammond Type4). Accutronics and Morley are currently part of Sound Enhancements, Inc. Sound Enhancements spokesman, Bill Wenzlogg, offered some additional Morley info:

 

"Tel-Ray Electronics officially became Morley in 1972. Tel-Ray was started by the Lubow brothers because they fixed televisions and radios - Tel-Ray, television/radio. Somewhere in the midst of that they began to goof around with a rotating device that Ray had come up with that worked off a dialectic oil and had this rotating box in the back of the pedal. It was meant to be a compact way to get a rotating Leslie sound without having the big huge speaker, that's where the Morley name came from - more-lee instead of less-lee. Their products initially were all rotating devices in a box format, like a mini amp head. Raymond was a crafty kind of Macgyber engineer. He adapted not only the dialectic oil and rotating capacitor in a disk, but also optical circuitry for the pedals. It wasn't a new technology; it was technology that existed in other applications that weren't used in the music industry.

 

"Throughout the seventies, the Lubow brothers maintained a fairly small staff, located in North Hollywood, and then in Burbank. Everything was done by hand, not with a lot of sophiticated machinery. And they certainly did their share of voodoo engineering, if you will, where they kind of changed designs based on what was available. They were almost a small custom shop. The price for a Morley Rotating Wah in 1977 was $259. That's like buying a thousand dollar pedal nowadays. And then the EVO-1 Echo Volume as $399. You could put a new engine in your car for that in 1977. So for the better part of the seventies, all this stuff was considered to be high-end pro gear"

 

 

Now that I typed all that in directly from the book, edit your post and delete all those stars in your message so I don't have to scroll left to right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did my wah research. The best by far ( in my opinion ) is the Fulltone Clyde Deluxe.

I was using a Crybaby' date=' and the Fulltone made it look and sound like a childs toy.

 

[img']http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c231/Toronto_Ontario/fulltone_clydeDELUXE.jpg[/img]

 

I have a Crybaby that I bought probably 15 years ago and, yeah, I agree - not to hot. It sucks the hell out of your signal when it's off too. I ended up going with a Teese RMC3.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I might take you up on that' date=' Surfpup. What do you do with them (in general, you don't have to divulge all your tricks)? [/quote']

 

It ain't original - just time consuming. I stole the mods off the Internet. I even posted the mods I did a month or so ago if you feel like soldering it up yourself. The biggest improvements are the cheapest - thought the hardest to solder - different resistor values. I also added a DPDT switch to mine, rewired it to make it true bypass, and removed all the buffer electronics the newer Cry Babys have (which they do to compensate for the tone suckage). I also upgraded the inductor to the reissued Fasel inductor. It is definitely bad a** now. In fact mine is almost too expressive. I may mod it a bit more to actually lessen the sweep! I have to be careful not to rock my foot too crazily because the same amount of travel now equals a huge range of tone change.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Impossible for Hendrix to have ever used a Morley wah as the company didn't exist' date=' or rather, wasn't called "Morley" until 1972 and Hendrix died in 1970. [/quote']

 

Oh, alright. i knew he was 27 when he died but i never knew morley wasn't around yet. false info i guess.

 

i guess this proves it. http://www.jimdunlop.com/index.php?page=products/pip&id=347

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Impossible for Hendrix to have ever used a Morley wah as the company didn't exist' date=' or rather, wasn't called "Morley" until 1972 and Hendrix died in 1970.

 

From Analogman's Guide to Vintage Effects (Analogman):

 

 

 

 

Now that I typed all that in directly from the book, edit your post and delete all those stars in your message so I don't have to scroll left to right.

 

you didn't type it from the book.

 

i saw the link when i quoted you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still have one of those 70's big fat Morley wah's with distortion. I actually like it. In the 25 or so years I've had it the only thing that had to be fixed was to change the little light in the optic sensor. They were so cheap that I bought a bunch incase one went out again (I taped the extra's inside the casing), but I've never had another problem. I changed that out 11 years ago.

 

I never liked the distortion sound and honestly I've not used it in probably 5 years nor have I used my Thompson Organ Cry Baby in that long. Right now I'm pretty much straight into the amp. But I do like that Morley Wah.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i picked up a crybaby just to try it, and see if i like wah, well i deffinately do, and i have to say i like the crybaby, my friend has a vox wah, its pretty good too

 

maybe thats because i havent tried anything else

 

 

i will probably end up upgrading it if i find another i like way more

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...