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highvibrational

Epiphone FT 150 BL - HELP!

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Hello,
I've just been gifted with an Epiphone FT 150 BL. Does anyone have any experience with this beautiful guitar? It seems like the action is high even though the neck is straight (flat when I put a ruler on it). Should I adjust the truss rod to make it more back bowed?  Or, do I need to rework the bolted on neck?  I'd also like to know what strings would work best to bring out the best tone, as well as any pertinent information.
Many thanks!

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Epiphone manufactured the FT-150 between 1972 and 1979. It was a Japanese-manufactured dreadnought acoustic guitar, this specific model being made in the midst of the Norlin “Square Label” era, suggesting this specific guitar was built between ‘75 and ‘79. It has a natural laminated spruce top, rosewood back and sides, a three piece adjustable neck, and a rosewood fingerboard with block inlays and a zero-fret. It has a decorative rosette, an adjustable bridge and chrome plated hardware. The mahogany neck is bolted on internally. This a sturdy, vintage acoustic that produces a good amount of sound. It is in great shape and shows wear that is consistent with that of an approximately 40 year old guitar. The action is decent but could easily be adjust even lower if desired. It just underwent and deep clean, fret-board conditioning, and restring and is ready to go! Includes the hard shell case pictured.

General Specifications:
Finish: Natural
Made in: Japan
Scale Length: 25.5 inches scale-length
Back Material: Rosewood
Side Material: Rosewood
Body Style: Dreadnought
Top Material: Spruce
Pickguard: Black Pickguard w/ Pearl “E” logo
Bridge: Adjustable Rosewood
Hardware: Chrome Hardware
Fingerboard Material: Rosewood
Fingerboard Position Markers: Pearl Block Inlays

epiphone.jpg

Edited by highvibrational

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Do not back-bow the neck under any circumstances.  You actually want a tiny amount of relief (or bowing) for optimal playing performance.

If the action remains high with a properly adjusted truss rod, look next at the placement of the saddle.  Since this model has an adjustable saddle, it's very easy to see if you can dial in a setting that works better for you.

Beyond that, the guitar might have some neck-set issues that can be reworked via the bolt on neck.

Many Japanese guitars from the '70s & '80s have a good reputation, but not Epiphones from this period.  Overall, the Epiphone models with bolt-on necks & the zero-fret are not well regarded for their build quality, and hence do not retain much value.

Edit:  Just wanted to add that I'm not trying to dissuade you from enjoying this instrument - just be cautious about sinking money into it.  If you can get it dialed-in without too much expense and the tone is satisfying, then it's all good! 

Edited by bobouz

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20 hours ago, bobouz said:

Do not back-bow the neck under any circumstances.  You actually want a tiny amount of relief (or bowing) for optimal playing performance.

If the action remains high with a properly adjusted truss rod, look next at the placement of the saddle.  Since this model has an adjustable saddle, it's very easy to see if you can dial in a setting that works better for you.

Beyond that, the guitar might have some neck-set issues that can be reworked via the bolt on neck.

Many Japanese guitars from the '70s & '80s have a good reputation, but not Epiphones from this period.  Overall, the Epiphone models with bolt-on necks & the zero-fret are not well regarded for their build quality, and hence do not retain much value.

Edit:  Just wanted to add that I'm not trying to dissuade you from enjoying this instrument - just be cautious about sinking money into it.  If you can get it dialed-in without too much expense and the tone is satisfying, then it's all good! 

I appreciate your comments.  I took this into an experienced luthier and he'll be doing a neck reset and set-up for $150.  I've been doing a lot of research on this model and while I haven't heard the greatest things about it, I'm curious to see how it will turn out.  I'm more concerned about playability.  If I enjoy playing her, she's a keeper.

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