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ndavis1971

1932 Tuxedo l00 12 fret arrived!

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So my l00 arrived. I only have a 48 hour inspection period. There have been some minor repairs and there is some bellying above the soundhole. It’s only 3 pounds so bellying not terribly surprising. What was surprising is how sonically it differs from my 1936 14 fret l00.  The 12 fret is louder, has more bass, and sounds less midrangey if that makes sense. I’d prefer no bellying but not sure how realistic that is with these guitars. Maybe someone can chime in. Sounds incredible. A cannon.  Like a vintage 0018. Of course sound matters most 

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Edited by ndavis1971
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Such a beautiful instrument! In my experience, bellying is entirely to be expected at that age. The old Bluegrass adage with Martins is "no belly, no tone" of course. It looks like a dream, enjoy!

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Glad it showed up.  After all the posts about the hunt, the guitar arriving is almost anti-climatic. As you say, unfortunately, top deflection is a fact of life with these guitars. Everything about them is just too lightly built.  Technically,  a top will  belly (swell) below the bridge and sink above it.    Only becomes a real issue when the action gets too high and the intonation goes awry.  My L1 has the typical  swollen belly beneath the  bridge so  a Thompson belly reducer in its future.   

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I don't have anything to say on the bellying, but I did want to say nice looking guitar!  Enjoy, you should have us all over to have a go on it 🙂

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With a guitar this old, my guess is typically that things have moved about as much as they're going to move.  If it's playability is satisfactory now & you treat it right, it should remain stable for a long time.

Coincidentally, D'Addario extra-light PB EJ-15 strings happen to suit my playing style on many of my acoustics.  Lighter strings might go a long ways towards easing your mind re future body changes.

The guitar looks like a winner - Enjoy!  

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Thanks guys for all the help! So what do I do with the 1936 14 fret?  Sell it?  This one is louder and has greater range but perhaps not a balanced kinda compressed more quite midrange as the 14 fret l00.  Is that characteristic of the 14 frets?  Worth keeping it as well?

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 I would do nothing regarding the 14 fretter.  At least for a while. Selling guitars were some of the worst mistakes I ever made.   You were in the enviable position of not having to use a guitar as trade bait or sell it to acquire something else.  Your are still in the honeymoon period with the 12 fretter  so everything about it is sweet as it gets. 

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5 hours ago, zombywoof said:

 I would do nothing regarding the 14 fretter.  At least for a while. Selling guitars were some of the worst mistakes I ever made.   You were in the enviable position of not having to use a guitar as trade bait or sell it to acquire something else.  Your are still in the honeymoon period with the 12 fretter  so everything about it is sweet as it gets. 

Ditto

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