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Hello and Gold Top refinishing question


mrhbelvis

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Hi everyone. I am new to the forum, so please excuse me if this is the wrong place to post this. My question is about where to go for a Les Paul Gold Top refinishing repair. I own a Custom-Shop '57 reissue (bought last year). When I opened my case today, to my horror I noticed a serious injury to the finish. Not sure how it happened (must have been last night at the show).

 

Let me see if I can describe it...there is a white dent where something "hit" the guitar's body, and then it must have scraped or dragged off lthe guitar, eaving a rip in the gloss about the size/width of first two digits of your pinky.

 

I hoped to get some advice on where to go to have this repaired. Fortunately, it is not a real vintage Paul...however it still cost a bundle and it is my mainstay.

 

I live on the East Coast (VA), but willing to drive or ship to have the work done right. Any help appreciated.

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Sorry to hear about the damage. I feel for you. You could try RS Guitarworks. You would have to ship it. I believe Gibson also will do repairs--but I am sure they are pretty costly.

 

One of the guys here will probably have some other good places to take her.

 

Good luck.

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This might not be the answer you're looking for, but have you considered just leaving it as is? Though I wouldn't intentionally scratch/dent a guitar (really, "relicked" guitars & "relicked" guitar players/poseur's annoy the hell out of me), I think natural accidents (provided you're not talking about cracking the neck or something) are just a part of owing and playing a guitar, and add to the overall warmth and personality of the individual instrument. Of course the choice is yours, but maybe you could try holding onto it as is for a month or two and see if it grows on you a bit...after all, you probably have a couple scratches on yourself, right?

 

Going back to the "relicked" look, at least you did this yourself and have a memory to go along with it, rather than paying someone to give the appearance that you actually play it!

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Hello crossroadsnyc. Normally I agree with your sentiments...my other guitars all have road-injuries and they do add to their personalities. For whatever reason this is one is different for me...my pride and joy. Seeing the injury to me was just like walking out to a new Ferrari to find a key scratches on the hood. If I can restore the finish, I would like to -- if for no other reason so I can allow normal wear-and-tear to resume.

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i hope you get that worked out mrhbelvis..i had a gash on my headstock and was trying to figure out how to fix it but i ended up just leaving it as is and yea i guess you can say it adds character in some odd way.

 

you got any pics of the goldtop?

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This might not be the answer you're looking for' date=' but have you considered just leaving it as is? Though I wouldn't intentionally scratch/dent a guitar (really, "relicked" guitars & "relicked" guitar players/poseur's annoy the hell out of me), I think natural accidents (provided you're not talking about cracking the neck or something) are just a part of owing and playing a guitar, and add to the overall warmth and personality of the individual instrument. Of course the choice is yours, but maybe you could try holding onto it as is for a month or two and see if it grows on you a bit...after all, you probably have a couple scratches on yourself, right?[/quote']

 

+1000

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Here is a picture of the "injury"

 

211057.jpg

 

I appreciate all the replies. To answer a few...

 

I am a player, not a collector. I get what you are saying...although I'm not sure why wanting my gear to remain in decent shape is a bad thing.

 

I also agree road-wear is generally cool and a badge of honor. This, however, was not standard road-wear -- something or someone ripped the finish unbenownst to me, and I think that is why I am so bent on trying to repair it back to where it was. It's not vintage, so my thinking is, what's the harm in seeing if it can be repaired? If it's not possible or too expensive, so be it. Just figured this was the place to check. Certainly not going to take it to Earl Shives +:-@

 

I contacted Rudy's in NY, but due to fire codes they do no refinishing

 

RS Guitarworks is getting back to me (wanted a photo)

 

Probably will end up doing nothing due to costs.

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If you can get the original paint, a spot repair would not be very noticeable.

 

Gold and silver are tough to match, so getting the original paint type would be the only way to assure a decent match.

 

The top clear coat is a breeze though.

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Thanks for the reply Dynadude. I have been playing 25+ years and have worked with all types of guitar hardware/electronics, however I know nothing when it comes to finishing. I honestly wasn't sure whether a spot repair was possible...so good to hear that may be an option (provided I can get the original paint)

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The resale value may go down, but I have no intention of ever selling it (I still own all the guitars I have ever purchased)...plus it's not true vintage. Vintage specs, but not really 50+ years old. I would never consider touching up a real '57 on principle (not to mention I probably wouldn't bring it to a road gig)

 

I spent hours and played literally dozens of Pauls before selecting this one. I quite literally fell in love with her. You will have to excuse my being overprotective a bit...in light of the injury, I just wanted to know my options

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The resale value may go down' date=' but I have no intention of ever selling it (I still own all the guitars I have ever purchased)...plus it's not true vintage. Vintage specs, but not really 50+ years old. I would never consider touching up a real '57 on principle (not to mention I probably wouldn't bring it to a road gig)

 

I spent hours and played literally dozens of Pauls before selecting this one. I quite literally fell in love with her. You will have to excuse my being overprotective a bit...in light of the injury, I just wanted to know my options

[/quote']

 

Thats sweet

my comments were just opinion and not meant to be rude or anything. I just like to show my scars.

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The clearcoat can very easily be touched up and that part of the repair will be invisible. however, the part of the gouge that goes down past the gold will be difficult to touch up because of the way the metallic particles lie in the lacquer. You'll probably see where the old starts and the new begins (ever try to touch up metallic paint on a car?).So the worst you can expect is that you'll be able to detect where it was done in a very small spot, and it probably will be noticeable only in certain light.

 

Then again, you'll always know where to look and it's you that it's going to bother the most.

 

If I were you, I'd keep looking for a luthier who is comfortable in doing the touchup.

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It looks like the damage might have been caused by the latch on your guitar case. My guess is someone took the guitar out and while putting it back the case lid came down on the body. That would explain the indentation and the gauging of the paint toward the edge of the body. Check the latch on top of your case--is there any flecks of gold on it?

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It looks like the damage might have been caused by the latch on your guitar case. My guess is someone took the guitar out and while putting it back the case lid came down on the body. That would explain the indentation and the gauging of the paint toward the edge of the body. Check the latch on top of your case--is there any flecks of gold on it?

 

Good eye Blue.

 

I just looked at my Cali Girl case, and there is a latch in that approximate position. The size and shape of the mark also fits the latch tongue to a T.

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  • 3 years later...

Bluemoon - Wow! No gold paint but the marks are a perfect match. I think you're right. Nice CSI work. My fault for not having it with me at all times but a bummer nonetheless.

 

I have had the same thing happen to some of my guitars. I now cut out the strap that holds the case lid up, it would close unintentionally and damage a guitar top. I wonder how you made out on the repair. I have a goldtop in my shop that needs a very small touch up. Gibson wont reveal what they add to the lacquer but I was told Crescent Bronze #256 is the flakes they have used. I also have heard thery may use Mica Flakes.

 

VP

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