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My j45 va modern deluxe 28 or hd28?


Getaway
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Used to own an HD28, but not the new reimagined ones.  And the Modern Deluxes have the graphite truss rod, liquid metal pins, and a few other differences. I have not tried one but there is a long thread on UMGF.com you can read.

https://umgf.com/martin-modern-deluxe-a-guitar-with-modern-vintage--t196988-s560.html#p2419454
 

Anyways, a J45 is a substantially different sound and feel than a Martin dread. Short scale vs long scale. Mahogany vs rosewood. I have also found the scalloped HD28 to have a muddy booming sound. If you are a singer you need to watch your attack and how you play it, but i suppose that’s true for any guitar. I also think no guitar forum or internet resource will help you “get” the differences between a Martin rosewood dread in any designation and Gibson hog slope. If you are playing them side by side you will no doubt just know which one is for you...  and my decide you want both for different things.

 

 

Edited by Salfromchatham
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I don't own any of them but played them all in stores. Hank Williams played just a regular D-28. Does it get any more country than that. HD's  are D's on steroids with scalloped bracing. J's are Hog not Rosewood I I believe, but you can get Rosewood and Walnut J's too.  Actually I guess a J-45 is whatever Gibson says it in nowadays. Both the Martin's are Rosewood only. The new Modern Deluxe D's people are loving and hating. Traditionalist will tell you it it ain't a real one unless it's this wood with this top and this and that. Only real way to tell is play em. 

One thing is for sure if your getting one new all of them ain't cheap. 

Edited by Sgt. Pepper
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I had 1-each to test drive at the same time a few months ago. I think the HD's ability to boom out helps to make sound chime-like or otherwise pretty. During the side-by-side test drives, I found them to each inspire distinct musical directions. The "D" let me really hop on the strings for some lively, but not too thick Martin rhythm sound. The HD pushed out a pretty musical tone with great ease. Chime-like, perhaps?

I understand that these test drives can differ from store to store, guitar to guitar, which doesn't help written accounts much.

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Any of these guitars are more than perfectly suitable for "country". I'd say take the one that feels and sounds best to you. 

J45's are iconic for the classic country singer/songwriter. They just get the job done and pair amazingly well when sung with. D28's (and D18's) are kind of the de-facto, go-to standard for Bluegrass flat picking. HD28's would work well too for all of the above, but I personally am not a fan and think they sound very unbalanced with an overly scooped midrange, a little muddy in the low end, and can get lost in the mix when played with a bunch of other people. HD28's do fingerpick really well though.

As far as the modern Deluxes go, I haven't played on where I preferred it over a Standard Series. 

I would sell the J45, but if you're looking for a guitar to compliment it, A D28 would be a wonderful addition to a J45. You'd have the long scale vs. short scale thing covered, You'd have the rosewood and mahogany thing covered,  singer/songwriter and flat picking thing covered, etc. 

Edited by sbpark
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53 minutes ago, jvi said:

SHOCKER ALERT-- j45s can play bluegrass and d 28s can be strummed with great results !!!

They sure can I pick bluegrass with the new Hummingbird I use Monel Tony Rice strings and it sounds great.  The HD28 is well played in which makes a big difference. The Bird will get there. You can do whatever you want with a J45. As far as complimenting one an other The the HD28 and Bird are so different in how they sound . They make a great pair.

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It comes down to what you like really. Not what the standard for say like bluegrass is a vintage Martin. For you older members you have heard of DR. Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountian boys.  One of the guitarists plays a ooo model. Not what you'd think he'd be playing. I owned a J45 for years and used it for bluegrass along with my HD28.  I plan on using my Hummingbird at times in the bluegrass band I play with. If I like it and it sounds good I'd use it.

Edited by John Joseph
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6 hours ago, John Joseph said:

It comes down to what you like really. Not what the standard for say like bluegrass is a vintage Martin. For you older members you have heard of DR. Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountian boys.  One of the guitarists plays a ooo model. Not what you'd think he'd be playing. I owned a J45 for years and used it for bluegrass along with my HD28.  I plan on using my Hummingbird at times in the bluegrass band I play with. If I like it and it sounds good I'd use it.

Not a blue grass person at all (Nashville Skyline Rag is not my favorite on the  record), but respect and of course sometimes listen to the genre. (Soft about M. Tuttle) 
Have noticed people often refers to blue grass when talking guitars - are they suited or not. But what defines a good BG-acoustic. Volume ? , , , or is there more to it. 

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6 hours ago, E-minor7 said:

Not a blue grass person at all (Nashville Skyline Rag is not my favorite on the  record), but respect and of course sometimes listen to the genre. (Soft about M. Tuttle) 
Have noticed people often refers to blue grass when talking guitars - are they suited or not. But what defines a good BG-acoustic. Volume ? , , , or is there more to it. 

Tom B could chime in on this, but I'd say volume, projection, and note articulation.

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19 hours ago, E-minor7 said:

Not a blue grass person at all (Nashville Skyline Rag is not my favorite on the  record), but respect and of course sometimes listen to the genre. (Soft about M. Tuttle) 
Have noticed people often refers to blue grass when talking guitars - are they suited or not. But what defines a good BG-acoustic. Volume ? , , , or is there more to it. 

E

 

13 hours ago, j45nick said:

Tom B could chime in on this, but I'd say volume, projection, and note articulation.

I've played in a bluegrass band for sometime.. one you need the ability to cut threw the banjo so volume. If your flat picking or doing runs you want good note articulation. With no amps projection.volume are important. I always liked a strong bass to but that is up to the player. I guess that's why Martins are seen a lot at bluegrass events. I've seen Sierra Hull pick the heck out of a Eastman E10D. In her hands it could've been a pre war Martin dread the way it sounded. I've been to a few bluegrass jams in Virginia and anymore along with Martins and Collings you see more Gibson and  even a few Taylors.

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I think a martin and a gibson should be in ones stable, but both should be mahogany dreads.  That is the foundation and then you build from there. 

With respect to guitars cutting through in a bluegrass jam...  I'm by far no expert, but the only time I heard a guitar measure up to the banjos, mandolins and fiddles was watching Randy Scruggs and his aj, and even then when it goes from banjo to the guitar - the lead takes a step back.  Give your ears a second to adjust and he's just plain awesome, but as good as the guitar is, it does not project as well.  Maybe it's mic placement.

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