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Gibson LP for advanced beginner


Joesan
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I have been playing on and off with my Ibanez GSA 60 with a very small Marshall amplifier. I used it to get used to playing chords, chord changes, strumming patterns and a very few songs. I recently for a Yamaha THR 10 V2 amplifier so that I can use it to play songs with some jamming sessions from my mobile phone. Since I'm new to this THR amplifier from Yamaha, I tried to follow some settings that I got from some Youtube videos hoping that I can get the same sound out my my Ibanez, but it was not. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong or is my guitar not capable of! But nevertheless, I have been contemplating now to get a better serious guitar that sounds good and is of a better quality tone wise. I have listened to a few videos on Gibson LP and I'm interested in trying them out, but just like any other beginner into the LP's, I'm confused as to which ones I should be looking into?

My understanding is that there is the Studio, Classic, Traditional and Standard though I'm not sure what the exact differences are between these variants. I would mostly be playing blues and jazz kind of music and the goal is definitely not get into playing with any band, but just be able to play a few songs and jam along. Could anyone please run me through the LP variants and suggest me where I should start. There is no hurry for me to get this one asap, but since I will be spending more on a LP, I want to make a conscious decision, spend lots of time trying out different variants and with the suggestion from the forum, get the right one that I can keep and play for long. What I would be very much interested to know between the LP variants is:

Are the differences between the variants is just in the cosmetics like flame top, binding, gloss finish etc?

This one here for example., looks like a bargain, but what I do not understand is that if it is a Studio or yet another totally new variant?

https://www.thomann.de/de/gibson_lp_studio_tribute_2019_sit.htm?utm_source=idealo&utm_medium=psm&utm_campaign=idealode&offid=1&affid=229&subid=idealode

Edited by Joesan
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The Les Paul Tribute shares many features with the higher-priced Les Pauls. 
It's a Solidbody Electric Guitar with Mahogany Body, Maple Top, Maple Neck, Rosewood Fingerboard, and 2 Humbucking Pickups.
That said, for an American-made Gibson, it's the most preiswert .
It features un-covered 490T and 490R humbuckers, very basic tuners, and ultra-modern weight relief. 

The Les Paul Studio is also a Solidbody Electric Guitar with Mahogany Body, and Maple Top. It features a Mahogany Neck, Rosewood Fingerboard, and 2 Humbucking Pickups.

Worth a few hundred Euros more than the Tribute, the Studio has the coil-tapped 490R/498T humbucking pickups.
It also has the slim tapered neck, on top of the ultra modern weight-relief.
It's a lot like a Les Paul Standard, only without a beautiful matched maple top, and without the nice edge binding. 

Add another four hundred Euros, and you have the Les Paul Classic. 
She's got Grover tuners, original-design PAF humbuckers, a self-lubing graphite nut, 
For a 'Classic', it's got some modern electronics. 
Dual push-pull volume controls switch between single-coil and humbucking operation.
Push-pull neck tone controls pickup phase reversal.
Push-pull bridge tone control activates pure bypass mode.
Features the nine-hole weight relief. 


The Les Paul Standard is offered in a variety of decade-period offerings.  The '60's version anyway features a gorgeous maple top with nitrocellulose finish.
Bridge pickup: Burstbucker 61T humbucker
Neck pickup: Burstbucker 61R humbucker
Handwired electronics with Orange Drop capacitors
Slim tapered neck, plek'ed fret ends, top-notch edge binding, and you have a guitar that costs 500 Euros more than the Classic. 

I hope this helps. 
I'm sure there are other features that are noteworthy. 
I personally would be very happy to get my hands on the Tribute. 
It's a fabulous guitar. 

:)

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21 minutes ago, sparquelito said:

The Les Paul Tribute shares many features with the higher-priced Les Pauls. 
It's a Solidbody Electric Guitar with Mahogany Body, Maple Top, Maple Neck, Rosewood Fingerboard, and 2 Humbucking Pickups.
That said, for an American-made Gibson, it's the most preiswert .
It features un-covered 490T and 490R humbuckers, very basic tuners, and ultra-modern weight relief. 

The Les Paul Studio is also a Solidbody Electric Guitar with Mahogany Body, and Maple Top. It features a Mahogany Neck, Rosewood Fingerboard, and 2 Humbucking Pickups.

Worth a few hundred Euros more than the Tribute, the Studio has the coil-tapped 490R/498T humbucking pickups.
It also has the slim tapered neck, on top of the ultra modern weight-relief.
It's a lot like a Les Paul Standard, only without a beautiful matched maple top, and without the nice edge binding. 

Add another four hundred Euros, and you have the Les Paul Classic. 
She's got Grover tuners, original-design PAF humbuckers, a self-lubing graphite nut, 
For a 'Classic', it's got some modern electronics. 
Dual push-pull volume controls switch between single-coil and humbucking operation.
Push-pull neck tone controls pickup phase reversal.
Push-pull bridge tone control activates pure bypass mode.
Features the nine-hole weight relief. 


The Les Paul Standard is offered in a variety of decade-period offerings.  The '60's version anyway features a gorgeous maple top with nitrocellulose finish.
Bridge pickup: Burstbucker 61T humbucker
Neck pickup: Burstbucker 61R humbucker
Handwired electronics with Orange Drop capacitors
Slim tapered neck, plek'ed fret ends, top-notch edge binding, and you have a guitar that costs 500 Euros more than the Classic. 

I hope this helps. 
I'm sure there are other features that are noteworthy. 
I personally would be very happy to get my hands on the Tribute. 
It's a fabulous guitar. 

🙂

 

Thanks for breaking this down. So looking at the specs., I would prefer to stay in the Studio variant as it is pretty much what I want to spend and also looks like mostly it is a cosmetic difference with the higher end models (Tradition & Standard), though it looks like it does make a difference. But nevertheless for my style of playing and the budget I have, I will perhaps try out the Studio variant in the next couple of weeks and pull the trigger when offers are running!

By the way, does Gibson change the Spec every year on their LP variants? Is the LP Studio 2019 the same as it was the previous years? 

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Edit: What you posted is NOT a Studio. It is a Studio Tribute, which is a considerably different guitars. In short the Studio Tribute was Gibson's attempt of simplifying the lineup. They replaced the two lower trims, the Faded and Tribute, with one that combined elements of both, the Studio Tribute. Why on earth they bring back the double named models from 2016 that created confusion is beyond me. My suggestion is they should never ever use the word Studio in any other maple/mahogany body singlecut LP model other than the Studio. I've seen my fair share of Faded being sold as Studios in the used market and it's a big pet peeve I have. 

Gibson changed CEO this year. Before that, they changed the lineup every year. Announcement of the new lineup happened in the fall. So, for instance, the 2017 models were announced and released in 2016. Thus, in 2018 a 2019 model lineup was announced and released under the old directive. 


The 2019 models under the old CEO evolved from the 2016 models. So let’s start with that. In 2016 there were:

  • Studio Faded: Worn Satin finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, '59 rounded neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker Pro, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  •  Tribute 50s & 60s: Satin finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, '50s rounded (50s) and Slim Taper (60s) neck profiles, Trapezoid inlays, uncovered 490R/498T (50s) and P-90 (60s), PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, blank truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, ?, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra '57Classic/'57Classic+, ?, ?, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Traditional neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered '57Classic/'57Classic+, ?, no coil tap, AA maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

All these models were available in two different specs Traditional (T) vs High Performance (HP). The specs above are based on the T spec models. Then in 2017 was somewhat similar to 2016, same T and HP spec availability. Gibson introduces the ultra modern weight relief. The studio faded created (and still creates) a lot of confusion between it and the studio, so the studio faded essentially became the faded. Here is the summary of 2017:

  • Faded: Worn Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, blank truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  •  Tribute: Satin finish, 9-hole Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, Tribute truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra '57Classic/'57Classic+, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Traditional neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

2018 there are small changes, like, gig bags are replaced with soft cases. One major change is that only the Standard is available in HP specs. The biggest change occurs with the Classics, that instead of humbuckers came with P-90s.

  • Faded: Worn Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, blank truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  •  Tribute: Satin finish, no Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered  '57 Classic/'57 Classic+, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no body binding and white fretboard, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, P-90s, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, N/A, maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Standard neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

All this time people were complaining that the lineup was too complicated. So the 2019 models under the old directive tried to shorten the lineup. Noticing the similarities between the Faded and the Tribute, they release a new model that combine features from both. In my opinion this is the worst model ever created. It had the finish of tributes that in my opinion didn't go well with the dot inlays (I don't mind the dot inlays so much on the Faded). This is the guitar you linked. Here is the old 2019 lineup.

  • Studio Tribute (the aberration): Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered  490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no body binding and white fretboard, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra 61R/61T, PCB wiring, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, reflector knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Standard neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & slug selection + 5 internal dip switches (HP wiring), AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

Then came the new CEO and decided to change directions. The year model was no more. Instead there is now an Original Collection and a Modern Collection. Restricting to just the maple on mahogany singlecut LPs, here is a summary:

  • Modern Collection:
    • Tribute: Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, rounded taper neck profile, trapezoid inlays, covered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
    • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered  490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
    • Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra Burstbucker 61R/Burstbucker 61T, PCB wiring, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, reflector knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
    • Modern: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge, ebony fretboard, access heel joint. 
  • Original Collection:
    • Standard 50s: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, 50s neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 or P90s, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge, narrower headstock, thinner binding. 
    • Standard 60s: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, 60s Slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 61R/Burstbucker 61T, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, reflector knobs w/ pointers, Grover tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge, narrower headstock, thinner binding. 

I hope this helps. Whether you're a beginner, advanced beginner, intermediate, advanced or professional player is irrelevant to which guitar you should get. What you should ask is whether you can afford it, is the "improvement" of going up in the lineup worth it to you, and do you think you're going to stick with playing in the long run. 

Edited by pauloqs
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53 minutes ago, Joesan said:

By the way, does Gibson change the Spec every year on their LP variants? Is the LP Studio 2019 the same as it was the previous years? 


Gibson tends to mix things up every year or two, and offer slight deviations from season to season, in order to attract new buyers. 
(And to convince long-time Gibson owners to buy something new and different.)

The Studio that I owned brand new in 1996 resembles the 2019 Studio cosmetically, but the weight relief is a newer change, as is the neck taper and the coil-tapping. 

I would much rather own a newer Studio, quite personally. 
The heavy Les Pauls were very painful to strap on for a full set, and I like the sonic differences that coil-tapping offers. 
The neck shape doesn't really do anything for me one way or another. 
I can adapt to any neck, as long as the guitar offers sweet playing and sweeter tones. 

:)

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17 hours ago, pauloqs said:

Edit:

I hope this helps. Whether you're a beginner, advanced beginner, intermediate, advanced or professional player is irrelevant to which guitar you should get. What you should ask is whether you can afford it, is the "improvement" of going up in the lineup worth it to you, and do you think you're going to stick with playing in the long run. 

 

Well if I can't afford it, I will perhaps save some money over the time so that I can afford it. When I started with the guitar, I have seen tons and tons of advice to get a cheaper guitar but after playing with them for quite some time, I realised that it was not at all worth it. You will outgrow it very quickly.

Now coming to the Gibson LP's, I just want to be doubly sure that I get the correct LP variant so that I can stick with it for decades, provided that it holds its quality which I hope an American made Gibson LP will! 

Thanks for your detailed post! I'm just leaning more towards the Studio version as that would be something that I could afford for now and that is exactly my budget!

Edited by Joesan
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3 hours ago, Joesan said:

 

Well if I can't afford it, I will perhaps save some money over the time so that I can afford it. When I started with the guitar, I have seen tons and tons of advice to get a cheaper guitar but after playing with them for quite some time, I realised that it was not at all worth it. You will outgrow it very quickly.

Now coming to the Gibson LP's, I just want to be doubly sure that I get the correct LP variant such that I want to stick with it for decades,. provided that it holds its quality and I hope a American made Gibson LP will! 

Thanks for your detailed post! I'm just leaning more towards the Studio version as that would be something that I could afford for now and that is exactly my budget!


That’s an excellent choice. Year in, year out Studios and Classics are great options. They seems to have a bit more attention to detail than Faded & Tribute, but you still aren’t paying a premium for cosmetic features. I’ve played Studios and Classics that sounded better than your average standard. With that said I‘ve played standards & tributes that sound-wise got into custom shop territory and this is coming from a Gibson Custom fan.

Edited by pauloqs
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Some very good information here about the different features of different models.  In your situation I think you are headed in the right direction toward a studio or a classic.  What is important is to go to guitar shops and play as many as you can.  Each guitar is slightly different and you need to feel and hear it to make the best decision for you.  Try to play it through the same amplifier that you own or if yours is not too big, take it with you so you can hear what the guitar will sound like when you get it home.  

One other thing to consider is buying a used Les Paul.  These really need to be seen and played in person, but you might find a higher end model at a lower price because of a few scratches that don't affect the sound or playability of the guitar.

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Adding even a little more confusion, there is also the "Traditional Pro" (aka, Trad Pro) line that is a specific line only for Guitar Center that takes a number of specific features and offers this packaging exclusively by Guitar Center at a relatively affordable price.   They are currently on "Trad Pro V" which is new and also challenging the aforementioned "relatively affordable price" part.  There is currently a humble thread I started on the Trad Pro V that has some more info, if you are at all interested.  I do not wish to clutter up this thread with repetitive details here.

Trad Pro Thread

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I'm pretty much fixed on the Studio now. I will try them out in the next few days at a store probably! Now comes the choice of the color. Which color for the Studio would look good given that it is going to stay with me for years together. I'm considering either the Tangerine burst (TB) or the Smokehouse burst (TB). Which among these 2 colors look good even after several years? I would personally prefer a Sunburst eyes closed, but there is no Studio model for 2020 in a Sunburst, so I had to stick either with the TB or SB. So which one guys and why? Would love to hear your thoughts!

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Just wanted to say that this is the best comparison of the LP Models of the last few years I've seen posted.

And excellent reference for anyone interested in comparing models when trying to decide over the confusing name changes lately.
Kudos to pauloqs for this, it's a keeper.

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On 12/25/2019 at 10:03 PM, pauloqs said:

Edit: What you posted is NOT a Studio. It is a Studio Tribute, which is a considerably different guitars. In short the Studio Tribute was Gibson's attempt of simplifying the lineup. They replaced the two lower trims, the Faded and Tribute, with one that combined elements of both, the Studio Tribute. Why on earth they bring back the double named models from 2016 that created confusion is beyond me. My suggestion is they should never ever use the word Studio in any other maple/mahogany body singlecut LP model other than the Studio. I've seen my fair share of Faded being sold as Studios in the used market and it's a big pet peeve I have. 

Gibson changed CEO this year. Before that, they changed the lineup every year. Announcement of the new lineup happened in the fall. So, for instance, the 2017 models were announced and released in 2016. Thus, in 2018 a 2019 model lineup was announced and released under the old directive. 


The 2019 models under the old CEO evolved from the 2016 models. So let’s start with that. In 2016 there were:

  • Studio Faded: Worn Satin finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, '59 rounded neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker Pro, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  •  Tribute 50s & 60s: Satin finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, '50s rounded (50s) and Slim Taper (60s) neck profiles, Trapezoid inlays, uncovered 490R/498T (50s) and P-90 (60s), PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, blank truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, ?, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra '57Classic/'57Classic+, ?, ?, plain maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Traditional neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered '57Classic/'57Classic+, ?, no coil tap, AA maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

All these models were available in two different specs Traditional (T) vs High Performance (HP). The specs above are based on the T spec models. Then in 2017 was somewhat similar to 2016, same T and HP spec availability. Gibson introduces the ultra modern weight relief. The studio faded created (and still creates) a lot of confusion between it and the studio, so the studio faded essentially became the faded. Here is the summary of 2017:

  • Faded: Worn Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, blank truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  •  Tribute: Satin finish, 9-hole Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, gig bag, Tribute truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra '57Classic/'57Classic+, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover locking tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Traditional neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, speed knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

2018 there are small changes, like, gig bags are replaced with soft cases. One major change is that only the Standard is available in HP specs. The biggest change occurs with the Classics, that instead of humbuckers came with P-90s.

  • Faded: Worn Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, blank truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  •  Tribute: Satin finish, no Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered 490R/498T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, reflector knobs & pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered  '57 Classic/'57 Classic+, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no body binding and white fretboard, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, P-90s, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, N/A, maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Standard neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

All this time people were complaining that the lineup was too complicated. So the 2019 models under the old directive tried to shorten the lineup. Noticing the similarities between the Faded and the Tribute, they release a new model that combine features from both. In my opinion this is the worst model ever created. It had the finish of tributes that in my opinion didn't go well with the dot inlays (I don't mind the dot inlays so much on the Faded). This is the guitar you linked. Here is the old 2019 lineup.

  • Studio Tribute (the aberration): Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, slim taper neck profile, dot inlays, uncovered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
  • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered  490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no body binding and white fretboard, Nashville Bridge.
  • Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra 61R/61T, PCB wiring, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, reflector knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Traditional: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, Standard neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
  • Standard: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & slug selection + 5 internal dip switches (HP wiring), AAA maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge. 

Then came the new CEO and decided to change directions. The year model was no more. Instead there is now an Original Collection and a Modern Collection. Restricting to just the maple on mahogany singlecut LPs, here is a summary:

  • Modern Collection:
    • Tribute: Satin finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Maple neck, rounded taper neck profile, trapezoid inlays, covered  490R/490T, PCB wiring,  no coil tap, plain maple top, top hat knobs, Gibson deluxe tuners, soft case, Tribute truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
    • Studio: Gloss finish, Ultra Modern Weight Relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered  490R/498T, PCB wiring, coil tap, plain maple top, speed knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Studio truss rod cover, no binding, Nashville Bridge.
    • Classic: Gloss finish, 9-hole weight relief, Mahogany neck, Slim Taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, zebra Burstbucker 61R/Burstbucker 61T, PCB wiring, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, reflector knobs, Grover tuners, hard case, Classic truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge. 
    • Modern: Gloss finish, ultra modern weight relief, Mahogany neck, slim tamper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker pro, PCB board, coil tap & phase inverse & pure bypass, maple top, top hat knobs, Grover locking  tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, Nashville Bridge, ebony fretboard, access heel joint. 
  • Original Collection:
    • Standard 50s: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, 50s neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 1/Burstbucker 2 or P90s, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, top hat knobs w/ pointers, Gibson deluxe tuners, hard case, Standard truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge, narrower headstock, thinner binding. 
    • Standard 60s: Gloss finish, no weight relief, Mahogany neck, 60s Slim taper neck profile, Trapezoid inlays, covered Burstbucker 61R/Burstbucker 61T, hand wired w/ orange drop capacitor, no coil tap, AA maple top, reflector knobs w/ pointers, Grover tuners, hard case, Traditional truss rod cover, cream binding, ABR-1 Bridge, narrower headstock, thinner binding. 

I hope this helps. Whether you're a beginner, advanced beginner, intermediate, advanced or professional player is irrelevant to which guitar you should get. What you should ask is whether you can afford it, is the "improvement" of going up in the lineup worth it to you, and do you think you're going to stick with playing in the long run. 


this is an excellent and informative post that unravels the myriad models.

 

to the OP - where you are on your journey and your budget should be the determining factor.
out of all the above I’d go for the faded with the 490r 490t or the studio with 57 classics.

my reasoning they are great value, only cosmetics are keeping the costs down. Those pickups capture the essence of what the Les Paul was all about when humbuckers were first added ( yes the burst buckers are probably better but those guitars cost way more only really experienced ears will hear that difference  )

the 498T I find is a bland compressed modern generic sounding pickup played clean but with a bit of gain it’s sings but compared to the 490s and 57s I don’t like it.

490s are a bit brighter in the top end than 57s so I think work better in a solid mahogany body. But the 57s have very smooth mids. 
 

I would try those 2 out, A/B them.

 

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I ended up eventually getting an electric guitar and it was not the Gibson Les Paul but rather I went ahead with the Fender Stratocaster Performer series. I was at the store today and tried both the LP and the Strat for hours together and found the Strat more comfortable to play for my needs and hence this decision!

Edited by Joesan
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6 minutes ago, Joesan said:

I ended up eventually getting an electric guitar and it was not the Gibson Les Paul but rather I went ahead with the Fender Stratocaster Performer series. I was at the store today and tried both the LP and the Strat for hours together and found the Strat more comfortable to play for my needs and hence this decision!

Like on the Pat Travers album Go For What You Know. I've owned about 4 or 5 Strats in the past. No shame it in it.

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Over the years there have been so many variations it would almost be like trying to describe the difference between every make of Automobile...  Pickups alone there are numerous variations of Humbuckers & several P90's.. Then you get into various eras & so many Models. Plus, New, Used & Vintage..

It's good to inquire here but also check out YouTubes. There are also Gibson Guitar Books available which can be a good source of information. Going to every Store you can to play as many different Guitars is the true test though. If you live near a big City like L.A. There are stores like Hollywood Guitar Center that will blow your mind! They have everything imaginable.. 

They say you'll know it when you play it.. That's pretty much true IMO. 

The quest can be never ending...  Good luck!

Edited by Larsongs
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