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Lost gems - songs that deserve to go down in history

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12 hours ago, E-minor7 said:

Probably connected via McCartney - well a guess. Back then the beat circles were very narrow.  The tripe/trip didn't count many indians. . 

I think I was surprised to see him on a US-based production from this era. This guy and his brother (Andy) have their stamps on a lot of music I enjoy. 

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23 hours ago, zombywoof said:

Some great choices here - R.L who if you were real lucky you could see playing on his porch on your way to Junior's Place and  Graham Parker who in a prefect world would have sold more LPs than Springsteen 

But for my money,  if there is a song that belongs on the Mount Rushmore of tunes this be it.   I have been a big fan since Fairport Convention.

 

 

 

 

Aaaaah...  Yes !   Thanks for this ZW ...I'd  forgotten hearing it years back.  You got my vote !!  

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2 hours ago, fortyearspickn said:

 

Aaaaah...  Yes !   Thanks for this ZW ...I'd  forgotten hearing it years back.  You got my vote !!  

Anything by that guy. Saw him 3 times. He is beyond good.

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3 hours ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

Anything by that guy. Saw him 3 times. He is beyond good.

Yes, he is.

It never occurred to me that Vincent Black Lightning was a lost gem. I still listen to it at least once a month. "Red hair and black leather: my favorite color scheme" is a brilliant snippet of lyric.

Never mind his guitar-playing skills, which are from another planet.

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1 hour ago, j45nick said:

Yes, he is.

It never occurred to me that Vincent Black Lightning was a lost gem. I still listen to it at least once a month. "Red hair and black leather: my favorite color scheme" is a brilliant snippet of lyric.

Never mind his guitar-playing skills, which are from another planet.

He played it every time I saw him live. I just listened to R & L Thompson - Shoot Out The Lights last night.

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I'll give follow on shout outs for RL Burnside noted from PB -  one of my favorite songs has to be *** pocket full of whiskey...  but really love all his stuff, and then a shout out to Vincent Black Lightning noted from ZW. 

Very cool stuff - but one of my all time favorites I was introduced to here on this forum (via Buc) is Kieran Kane - cool me down.  This song got ahold of me from the first time i heard it, and has just never let go.

 

 

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20 hours ago, billroy fineman said:

I'll give follow on shout outs for RL Burnside noted from PB -  one of my favorite songs has to be *** pocket full of whiskey...  but really love all his stuff, and then a shout out to Vincent Black Lightning noted from ZW. 

Very cool stuff - but one of my all time favorites I was introduced to here on this forum (via Buc) is Kieran Kane - cool me down.  This song got ahold of me from the first time i heard it, and has just never let go.

 

 

That was nifty! Thanks!

I went 'tubing for about 3 hours after this. Found a cover of "For What it's Worth". This cover doesn't fit the thread, but does fit the Acoustic section of the Gibson forum.

 

This one has the bonus of actually sounding really nice, technically speaking.

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6 hours ago, PatriotsBiker said:

That was nifty! Thanks!

I went 'tubing for about 3 hours after this. Found a cover of "For What it's Worth". This cover doesn't fit the thread, but does fit the Acoustic section of the Gibson forum.

 

This one has the bonus of actually sounding really nice, technically speaking.

Absolutely freakin' awesome!!!

What is that tiny four-string Fender electric guitar? A junior-sized tenor? Never seen one of those before.

Other than the Buffalo Springfield original--which virtually introduced a new sub-genre of music to a  wide audience, not to mention being  the first time most of us had heard of  Stephen Stills and Neil Young--this is about the best version I've seen.

I can't remember if it was on Ed Sullivan, or some other mainstream network show, where I first saw Buffalo Springfield on US television right after this came out. It was early 1967, and I was home from college briefly, and watched it with my father. He didn't have a clue what it was about, and didn't know his son was about to come home less than a  year later with long hair, a beard, and pretty outspokenly anti-war. That was a hard one for my retired Air Force colonel father to accept, and sparked more than a bit of family turmoil for several years.

I hadn't owned my original J-45--still have it--more than a few months  at that time, and was still pretty much a "traditional" folkie. My horizons expanded shortly thereafter, with a little chemical assistance.

To me, this song lit up a fork in the road. Never looked back.

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Excellent version and ensemble. Stills would be glad, , , how friggin' up front he was in 67. 

But who's playing the flageolets in the intro.  
 

1 hour ago, j45nick said:

Absolutely freakin' awesome!!!

What is that tiny four-string Fender electric guitar? A junior-sized tenor? Never seen one of those before.

Other than the Buffalo Springfield original--which virtually introduced a new sub-genre of music to a  wide audience, not to mention being  the first time most of us had heard of  Stephen Stills and Neil Young--this is about the best version I've seen.

I can't remember if it was on Ed Sullivan, or some other mainstream network show, where I first saw Buffalo Springfield on US television right after this came out. It was early 1967, and I was home from college briefly, and watched it with my father. He didn't have a clue what it was about, and didn't know his son was about to come home less than a  year later with long hair, a beard, and pretty outspokenly anti-war. That was a hard one for my retired Air Force colonel father to accept, and sparked more than a bit of family turmoil for several years.

I hadn't owned my original J-45--still have it--more than a few months  at that time, and was still pretty much a "traditional" folkie. My horizons expanded shortly thereafter, with a little chemical assistance.

To me, this song lit up a fork in the road. Never looked back.

You were not alone*, Nick. We simply had to challenge our old men; there were no ways around it. Later we understood what they didn't understand.  And re-embraced them. 

Sometimes that worked the way around too. Not in my case though, , , not at all. .   

Nash got all that down in the just as important Teach Your Children. 

 

*Neither regarding digging B. S. 

By the way the band shows us why upright 4-fat-string-boxes are called double-bass.  There used be 2 in the groups way back  before the thirties, , , whenever. . 

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Regarding the acoustics I think we see  McCoury himself behind some sort of Golden Era Mart. D-18. In the middle what could be a Collings HD-28, but, , ,  the last one to the right in the scene I'm unable to grasp. Never seen a headstock like it and can't quite decode the logo.  A modified 28 !!??!

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1 hour ago, E-minor7 said:

Regarding the acoustics I think we see  McCoury himself behind some sort of Golden Era Mart. D-18. In the middle what could be a Collings HD-28, but, , ,  the last one to the right in the scene I'm unable to grasp. Never seen a headstock like it and can't quite decode the logo.  A modified 28 !!??!

I'm just watching  on my laptop screen, so I can't be sure, but I thought the one on the right was just a D-28 with a tuner clipped on the headstock.

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1 hour ago, E-minor7 said:

Excellent version and ensemble. Stills would be glad, , , how friggin' up front he was in 67. 

But who's playing the flageolets in the intro.  
 

Those are harmonics played on the 4-string electric.

You can see it in the corner of the close-up shot beginning at about 27 seconds.

Edited by j45nick

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6 minutes ago, j45nick said:

Those are harmonics played on the 4-string electric.

Is it in reality a ping-pong, , , rather pling-plong between the 4-string el. and the dobro. . 

 

9 minutes ago, j45nick said:

I'm just watching  on my laptop screen, so I can't be sure, but I thought the one on the right was just a D-28 with a tuner clipped on the headstock.

We need a third, fourth and fifth set of eyes here. 👀

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The guy playing the D-28 just has some sort of tuner on his headstock. The other guy looks like its a D-18. I have owned both. The older guy's has black binding (its actually tortoise on a D-18) and the younger guy has white binding.

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5 hours ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

The guy playing the D-28 just has some sort of tuner on his headstock. The other guy looks like its a D-18. I have owned both. The older guy's has black binding (its actually tortoise on a D-18) and the younger guy has white binding.

Guess it's a HD-28V or the brand new 28 with cut-through saddle.  But the 'tuner' still puzzles me.  Never seen anything like it. Then again, , , who would  cut or extend a trad. Mart-headstock.

And yes, the 18-nestor is the chief of the group. Mr. McCoury.   

DWBGLe4.jpg

 

1nQXd0C.jpg

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10 hours ago, j45nick said:

Those are harmonics played on the 4-string electric.

You can see it in the corner of the close-up shot beginning at about 27 seconds.

Aahh, , , he's using a volume pedal. .  💡

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12 hours ago, j45nick said:

Absolutely freakin' awesome!!!

What is that tiny four-string Fender electric guitar? A junior-sized tenor? Never seen one of those before.

Other than the Buffalo Springfield original--which virtually introduced a new sub-genre of music to a  wide audience, not to mention being  the first time most of us had heard of  Stephen Stills and Neil Young--this is about the best version I've seen.

I can't remember if it was on Ed Sullivan, or some other mainstream network show, where I first saw Buffalo Springfield on US television right after this came out. It was early 1967, and I was home from college briefly, and watched it with my father. He didn't have a clue what it was about, and didn't know his son was about to come home less than a  year later with long hair, a beard, and pretty outspokenly anti-war. That was a hard one for my retired Air Force colonel father to accept, and sparked more than a bit of family turmoil for several years.

I hadn't owned my original J-45--still have it--more than a few months  at that time, and was still pretty much a "traditional" folkie. My horizons expanded shortly thereafter, with a little chemical assistance.

To me, this song lit up a fork in the road. Never looked back.

I don't know what that Fender instrument is. At first glance, I thought it was their 'Stratkulele', or whatever they call it, but those are acoustic. I wonder if there was an electric version at one time. Regardless, the tone following whatever else was involved ended up in some mashed combo between Duane Allman's medicine bottle slide playing LP , a fiddle and maybe a mando. Just guessing. It really does lend a great sound to the arrangement. Even just doing the harmonics.

I'm really digging that bass(es) tandem when it was their turn to step out.

There's another cover song from that session. The Beatles' "With a little Help From My Friends". Not as good, but not bad, either.

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16 hours ago, j45nick said:

What is that tiny four-string Fender electric guitar? A junior-sized tenor? Never seen one of those before.

 

Saw a documentary with Sam Bush playing something similar...  seems like an electric uke shaped to look like a strat. 

A few parts in here reminded me how much I want to learn the fiddle...  anyone ever give one a go - I would think there'd be  big learning curve to it before able to make any good sounds, anyone ever try?

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Nothing sounds better than a fiddle.

Nothing sounds worse than somebody trying to LEARN the fiddle.

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Actually, I always thought this one was going to be my big break.  Guess that ain't gonna happen.

 

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54 minutes ago, Murph said:

Actually, I always thought this one was going to be my big break.  Guess that ain't gonna happen.

 

Sounded great to me, Murph! Perhaps the absence of dancing ta-tas doing BGVs section?

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29 minutes ago, PatriotsBiker said:

 the absence of dancing ta-tas 

 

It's all coming to me now...

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3 hours ago, Murph said:

Actually, I always thought this one was going to be my big break.  Guess that ain't gonna happen.

 

 

Just add some EDM beats and virtual drums and send it off to Spotify. Should secure that retirement fund, no doubt!

Lars

 

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I didn't care much for this song when I first heard it.  Cash wrote it and it was just a song to fill-out an album.  But, as the years have passed I've found myself identifying with it easily.  For me, it's real and poignant.  Kind of like Tom Waits and his song "Martha"----feelings written 30-40 years before the writer is old enough to actually experience them.  Yet he/she understands them and can express them....................

 

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