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The rhythm guitar, SG or Les Paul?


EADGBE

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If Lead guitar is Gibson, Rhythm should be Fender, or Gretsch

 

If Lead guitar is Fender, Rhythm should be Gibson, or Gretsch

 

If Lead guitar is Gretsch, Rhythm should be Gibson, or Fender

 

The different scale lengths give Gibson (24.75") , Gretsch (25"), Fender (25.5") a unique voice and a band that uses the above strategy will have better punch and definition.

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Why? Rhythm makes up probably 90% of a typical rock song.

Personally, I never liked the idea of a rhythm guitar. I like the sparseness. For just playing chords (and making things muddy and drowning out the bass) any guitar'll do.

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That's a tough question, and I think the type of music would be a decisive factor.

 

BUT: For a singer, a lighter guitar is probably a good thing, so I would think the SG is worth considering, assuming of course that the sound fits the music being played.

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Personally' date=' I never liked the idea of a rhythm guitar. I like the sparseness. For just playing chords (and making things muddy and drowning out the bass) any guitar'll do. [/quote']

 

I disagree. I think it's much more difficult to get a good rhythm tone than lead tone and, unless you're BB King, every guitar player is going to be playing rhythm.

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When I played rock, I would use my LP Standard for rhythm and soloing. Our second guitarist used a '52RI Telecaster, and the combo was great, his Tele filled in the top end of the sonic spectrum that the LP was always shy of.

 

For heavier stuff, though, I would pair an SG for rhythm with a lead player's LP.

 

Conversely, I later played in a band where the rhythm guitarist/singer played an SG, and I played a Nashville Tele (the one with the standard Tele pups and a Strat pup in the middle) for lead.

 

That setup was super skanky and sounded exceptionally aggressive for the indie/metal we were playing.

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Depends on the amp I think. Personally to me the LP has always "looked" (and felt) more like a rhythm machine, wherein the SG looks (and feels) like it can cut through and should be the "lead" instrument.

 

But for recording my rhythms (got some new music uploaded to the Myspace page, by the by), I prefer the ol' import Malcolm Young model. Bigass chimey, fat airy goodness. Best damned rhythm sound ever. That and a Tele.

 

H-Bomb

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.... I'd say about anything is okay for rhythm unless you're trying to emulate a specific band. Hell, I used an accoustic electric - one of the first - in the early 1970s for a country and 50s rock band.

 

Then I dumped a Gretch that would be worth bundles nowadays for a "board" and then that one for a Hagstrom solidbody 12, then that for a Guild S100 that's essentially an SG clone. All that (and more, unfortunately) between 1972 and 1976. Bottom line is it cost me money with each trade and I'd have been a lot happier today had I kept the Gretch.

 

Even in the olden days we had a lot of potential sounds from amp and any of the above guitars. Heck, I could have just dumped half the strings from the 12 and been a lot happier today.

 

Frankly I think "we" tend to get so gear happy that we forget that even if we're trying to absolutely reproduce a recording of somebody else, the crowd doesn't mind that much as long as we're playing well, regardless of style. There's some truth to a difference in type of pickup bringing a bit of a difference in sound - but we guitar pickers are a lot more likely to hear and be concerned about it than the vast majority of listeners.

 

Again, even those wishing to sound "wave for wave" like somebody else has to realize their perceptions have been filtered through a playback system or the acoustics of a given venue.

 

Bottom line is that you have a guitar you're physically comfortable playing. The amp and perhaps stomp box settings erase the majority of physical differences among guitars. Heck, with a Gibbie, especially, you even have the option of an add-on pickup single or double pole.

 

Those of us who don't use electronic messing with the tone - just guitar and amp settings - still have an incredible variation of sounds with any given guitar.

 

Finally ... to be blunt, I think rhythm guitar playing has changed as much or more as lead playing. Some of those old pro "live radio" guys from the 20s through the 40s knew more chords and could switch chords with every beat of a tune - faster than I can think about what they were doing.

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