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Thanks Nick - great video. Very clear from yo to go!

On the other end of the scale is the Taylor acoustic guitar neck system, a stroke of genius whether you like the guitars or not. (My 717e Builder's edition is a great guitar! I don't play it and think there is no dovetail, just enjoy a fab guitar)

Here is a factory tour of the Taylor factory by Sweetwater Music. At 9 minutes, approx, they show the Taylor neck system which enables a neck set in a couple of minutes! I know there are yeahs and nays for both but post this for the contrast in old and new.... 9 minutes in....watch all if you want.

 

 

 

 

Edit : found a 'real world' Taylor neck reset video:

 

 

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

 

 

 

Edited by BluesKing777

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BK - My 614 is close to the edge of needing the neck re-set shim. I have to babysit the truss rod and saddles more than another other. I brought it to a taylor authorized shop. He agreed, but then wanted me to do this system that goes inside and remains adjustable by me. It's some sort of wooden dowel that goes from the back to the top and raises/lowers the top and hence, the bridge. Nothing wrong with my top, he says, but essentially gives me an adjustable bridge, he says. I ask about tone. Might not even notice, he says, or something like that.

Um - no thanks.

I had every intention of bringing it across county to the better tech dude, but that will have to wait a while.  What I REALLY wish for, though, is that Taylor wiould sell the shim kits to the general public. I understand why not, but still.

Edited by PatriotsBiker

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24 minutes ago, PatriotsBiker said:

BK - My 614 is close to the edge of needing the neck re-set shim. I have to babysit the truss rod and saddles more than another other. I brought it to a taylor authorized shop. He agreed, but then wanted me to do this system that goes inside and remains adjustable by me. It's some sort of wooden dowel that goes from the back to the top and raises/lowers the top and hence, the bridge. Nothing wrong with my top, he says, but essentially gives me an adjustable bridge, he says. I ask about tone. Might not even notice, he says, or something like that.

Um - no thanks.

I had every intention of bringing it across county to the better tech dude, but that will have to wait a while.  What I REALLY wish for, though, is that Taylor wiould sell the shim kits to the general public. I understand why not, but still.

 

Dowel?..

Doesn’t sound correct. Not a Gibson guy, is he? Bit of revenge, hey, hey.

It looked straightforward in the video I posted - hand in the hole, undo the bolts, take neck off, change shims to suit the required measurements. No dowell!

My 37 L-00 had a neck reset, new fretboard, bridge, everything really. I hope not to go through that too often and I wasn’t even there. A couple others of mine could do with a tweak but they are great slide guitars! The reset took way more than my patience lasted.......the guy in the first video had a neat little EMPTY shop and all the time in the world. My guy has a row of guitars to fix, like possibly 70 last time I was there.

 

BluesKing777.

 

Edited by BluesKing777

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This guy appears to know his way around old guitar. Good to know that a fellow Scandinavian (he is Norwegian) can take care of my old guitars should they need attention.

Lars

 

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21 minutes ago, Lars68 said:

This guy appears to know his way around old guitar. Good to know that a fellow Scandinavian (he is Norwegian) can take care of my old guitars should they need attention.

Lars

Just wondering,Lars ; isn't Dalin a Swedish name? Not that it makes any big difference but it seems more Svensk than Norsk as a point of reference.

 

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4 minutes ago, j45nick said:

 

Lars is Norwegian. He actually trained in Canada.

I was only referring to his surname being typically Swedish which wouldn't be surprising seeing that Sweden and Norway are next door neighbours.

Did he learn luthiery in Canada or was his training in another field?

I was curious about the name origin since I was born in Norway and am simply curious re. the etymology.

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1 hour ago, BluesKing777 said:

 

Dowel?..

Doesn’t sound correct. Not a Gibson guy, is he? Bit of revenge, hey, hey.

It looked straightforward in the video I posted - hand in the hole, undo the bolts, take neck off, change shims to suit the required measurements. No dowell!

My 37 L-00 had a neck reset, new fretboard, bridge, everything really. I hope not to go through that too often and I wasn’t even there. A couple others of mine could do with a tweak but they are great slide guitars! The reset took way more than my patience lasted.......the guy in the first video had a neat little EMPTY shop and all the time in the world. My guy has a row of guitars to fix, like possibly 70 last time I was there.

 

BluesKing777.

 

I'm with you. I wanted no part of that "repair" for at least two reasons.

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18 hours ago, j45nick said:

We see a lot of really mediocre guitar work videos. I thought this video, as well as the guy's work, deserved to be in this forum rather buried somewhere.

1974 D-28 neck re-set

That was a very nice video. Thanks for posting! I wish he had more videos. I am one of them. 

On a related note, do you have a favorite video that does a good job showing how to file the contact point and angle of the nut when nut filing?

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4 hours ago, olie said:

I was only referring to his surname being typically Swedish which wouldn't be surprising seeing that Sweden and Norway are next door neighbours.

Did he learn luthiery in Canada or was his training in another field?

I was curious about the name origin since I was born in Norway and am simply curious re. the etymology.

My Norwegian is a bit rusty, but his Norwegian-language website says he studied at the Summit School of Guitar Building and Repair, on Vancouver Island. He also appears to have worked at Larrivee Guitars in Vancouver. My ability to translate ends about there.

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9 minutes ago, j45nick said:

My Norwegian is a bit rusty, but his Norwegian-language website says he studied at the Summit School of Guitar Building and Repair, on Vancouver Island. He also appears to have worked at Larrivee Guitars in Vancouver. My ability to translate ends about there.

Thanks, nick.

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Yes, Dalin sounds more Swedish to me than Norwegian, but I guess it's a blurry line...

Here is another video, by the way.

Lars

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2 hours ago, Lars68 said:

Yes, Dalin sounds more Swedish to me than Norwegian, but I guess it's a blurry line...

Here is another video, by the way.

Lars

Thanks to both of you Lars' !

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Another wonderful video! His work is fastidious. Love that leather apron, too.

He talks about his training in this video as well.

Parts of his philosophy are interesting, such as not over-sanding the board to remove divots, and not deep-cleaning a vintage guitar.  The ones I have bought have sometimes been so grimy I was hesitant to handle them before cleaning.  A  lot of that depends on the personal habits of previous owners.

I have purchased two one-owner Gibsons in recent years: a 1947 L-7, and a 1950 J-45.  In one case, the grandson had inherited the guitar and never taken it out of the case (actually a gig bag).The owner of the L-7 was a chain smoker, and the guitar was unbelievably filthy. The gig bag had to be thrown away, as I couldn't even have it in the house.

In the case of the J-45, the guitar had basically been put away in the late 1950's, and never played again. That guitar was dirty, but nothing like the L-7. No smell of smoke at all--just that wonderful, intoxicating  old guitar smell that so draws you in.

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