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Identify my Dad's old Gibson Acoustic


jehale
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I have my Dad's old Gibson acoustic, but Dad is gone now and I am not sure of the Model of this guitar or the year.  I play this guitar regularly and enjoy it.

I would like to know the Model and and year, if someone could help me ID it?

Front:  https://share.icloud.com/photos/0cC7FZDRJfdMOsUdxalgoVlqg

Headstock:  https://share.icloud.com/photos/05y8RYaluC8qRhBixqDY3GuoQ

Back:  https://share.icloud.com/photos/0ag4GEDkDXKXFvYP7-E3oqDGw

Bridge:  https://share.icloud.com/photos/04aWWe_V5Ivt5GmnG-wICW57A

Headstock Stamp:  https://share.icloud.com/photos/0psExlTr7B3z8k4nIjWWki3zw

Bottom:  https://share.icloud.com/photos/0j4xFlpSCndWwLCulB7C6VFOQ

Interior Stamp:  https://share.icloud.com/photos/0kO84fEp_ec-FZ5t364EZ-cSg

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It looks like a J-50 - The FON stamped on the inside starts with Y, which indicates a 1953 body.  But the 20-fret neck and especially the serial number on the back of the headstock (70388) point to a mid-to-late 60s neck.  I'm sure others may chime in here.  

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I had one identical to this. Y serial number with 20 fret neck. Sold it a few years ago. My luthier who is very good said he saw no signs of the neck ever being replaced. He said it was not unusual for Gibson to mix match necks and bodies within a year or two. I had the saddle slot filled and remachined to correct the intonation. Your saddle looks like a makeshift being short on length and choppy on the ends so you may want to check out the intonation. 

Handed down guitars are special. Take care of it, play it and treasure it.

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I can't open the pics.  it was Gibson;'s habit though to stamp a serial number on the back of the headstock on a pre-61 guitar they got in for extensive repair.  But this guitar obviously does not have its original neck.   But as a few of us can testify, Gibson also did not use period-correct replacement parts on guitars they got in for repair but whatever they were currently using.   If you think about it though,  prior to the internet and the appearance of books on the histories of this or that guitar most of us would not have known we had bought a guitar with a replacement neck.  There was no place to go to look up what the original specs were or even look up an FON to figure out when the thing left the factory.

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In 1964, you would still have three-on-a-plate closed-back Klusons in any case.

This is truly an odd one, particularly if the number on the back to the headstock bears no relation at all to the FON inside.

When my original J-45 was at Gibson for work in 1968, they stamped the 1950 FON from the neckblock on the back of the headstock, and the new fretboard they installed was a 20-fret board.

I don't know at what point in production back in 1964  a neck acquired a serial number.  Was it before it was mated to a body, so that the serial number actually "belonged" to the neck? If so, maybe they just grabbed a replacement neck that already had a serial number.

Most curious, for sure.

Like ZW, I could not access the photos, so thanks to 62burst for posting them. Any chance he could post the photo of the FON inside?

It's a lovely J-50, by the way.

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It may just be the distortion of a wide angle lens, or there may have been damage to the neck block during construction. It looks like a vertical saw cut at the bottom left corner of the neck block, and maybe a chunk of the corner of the block missing at that corner. that may well just have been something that happened during construction.

On one of the top braces of my "new" 1950 J45, part of the top of one brace split off, probably while it was being scalloped, and they just glued it back in place.

Out of sight, out of mind.

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Original tuners on my 1965 J-50

65j50-3.jpg

 

On a somewhat related note, I see that Guitar Center has at least four 1964/64 J-50's, all around the $2000 price point. Maybe not a screaming bargain, but lower than these have been on their site in the past. Maybe we are starting to see prices drop with more used guitars coming in and fewer buyers?

Edited by Boyd
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36 minutes ago, Boyd said:

 

On a somewhat related note, I see that Guitar Center has at least four 1964/64 J-50's, all around the $2000 price point. Maybe not a screaming bargain, but lower than these have been on their site in the past. Maybe we are starting to see prices drop with more used guitars coming in and fewer buyers?

Those could be really good value at that price, depending on the condition and nut width.

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