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1960 Hbird Fixed Bridge demo


JuanCarlosVejar
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Hey - this beauty sounds good.

The caramelish back'n'sides/neck set it apart from the previous True Vintage/Vintage Hummingbirds and really make the whole thing come together.

Would love to try one live and compare it to my own broken in non-torrefied darker B'n'S also darker logoless necked (yes, Gibson !) 2012 TVs.

They'll be hard to match now, but the ex above is very alluring. 

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3 minutes ago, uncle fester said:

I love this guitar, but was a fixed bridge offered back then (might have been in the video, but must missed it?).  I'm torn between this and one of the new S Crowe CW as the current target of my GAS.  Thank you for posting.

By Kalamazoo - No it wasn't. 

Understand your dilemma de luxe.  Sweet situation in sour times. . 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I own a couple 60s and 61s. 4 digit serial number Birds. One with the factory p90    And there adjustable bridge guitars. 
 

2020 fixed bridge.  Okay.  
I should of watched the Vid. 1960 ? 

Edited by slimt
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On 4/6/2020 at 10:12 PM, jw3571 said:

Sounds really great, does anyone think it sounds better than one of the "normal" hummingbirds that is quite a bit cheaper?


Honestly I don’t think in terms of better or worse ... I think the standard hummingbird or the modern are great guitars but the historics (even if not 100 percent accurate) do capture a certain spirit present in the old ones.

 

JC

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51 minutes ago, JuanCarlosVejar said:


Honestly I don’t think in terms of better or worse ... I think the standard hummingbird or the modern are great guitars but the historics (even if not 100 percent accurate) do capture a certain spirit present in the old ones.

Think you are right - there is an obvious bond both in feel and sound between the new Vintage Birds (squares) and the actual vintage ancestors.  And though the modern versions differ a bit from ex to ex they can be absolutely stunning  acoustics when broken in. Regarding the oldies, the best of them are simply heavenly.  And not the slightest a hyped myth. The  ceramic saddled  cherry 1965 Southern Jumbo I played last year still blows my mind. Unfortunately it had the narrow neck., , , but my purse was happy. .

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3 hours ago, E-minor7 said:

Pardon. I came to late for the guitar - you come to late to the raining bath.

So, here's a question for you. I went on Gibson's website to verify this characteristic for the new models, by the way.

These new  'birds have scalloped top bracing. To the best of my knowledge, Gibson stopped scalloping top braces sometime in the mid-1950's. If that is correct, no 'bird before the Bozeman era would have had scalloped top bracing, and these modern versions may have a significantly different voice compared to a vintage 'bird.

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41 minutes ago, j45nick said:

So, here's a question for you. I went on Gibson's website to verify this characteristic for the new models, by the way.

These new  'birds have scalloped top bracing. To the best of my knowledge, Gibson stopped scalloping top braces sometime in the mid-1950's. If that is correct, no 'bird before the Bozeman era would have had scalloped top bracing, and these modern versions may have a significantly different voice compared to a vintage 'bird.

You are right. Check my second post from April 6.  We have different nut-width, different  braces (including back-b's) and the fixed saddle. 3 major factor in an acoustic guitar. 

Still it's fair to say they are connected like relatives - like a granddad is seen in his son's son, , , well, more than that. 

In other words : Gibson has done a good job in trying to create an updated modernized & loyal and 'image' of the mythological ancestor.  Also soundwise. And perhaps came even closer when did a batch of sunburst 1967 SJ's a few years ago. 

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37 minutes ago, E-minor7 said:

You are right. Check my second post from April 6.  We have different nut-width, different  braces (including back-b's) and the fixed saddle. 3 major factor in an acoustic guitar. 

Still it's fair to say they are connected like relatives - like a granddad is seen in his son's son, , , well, more than that. 

In other words : Gibson has done a good job in trying to create an updated modernized & loyal and 'image' of the mythological ancestor.  Also soundwise. And perhaps came even closer when did a batch of sunburst 1967 SJ's a few years ago. 

Fair enough. It would be interesting to try to nail down the fundamental tonal differences between the scalloped and un-scalloped tops  on the 'bird, if there are any. Unfortunately, you would need at least two of each kind for a valid comparison.

I have two mahogany slope-Js with scalloped top braces ('06 1943 SJ re-issue, 1950 J-45) and another which is un-scalloped (1950 J-45 re-topped by Gibson in 1968). There is a close family resemblance between the three, but their voices also have unique qualities. The two scalloped-brace guitars are quite similar to each other tonally despite their 50+ year age differences, with the older guitar having a bit more sustain and projection. The un-scalloped guitar is a bit subdued and dry by comparison but nicely balanced with good note separation.

Clearly siblings, but not identical triplets.

 The scalloped and un-scalloped 'birds may have similar family resemblances and differences.

At the end of the day, all guitars are individuals, and we need to appreciate each for what it is, warts (if any) and all.

 

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17 minutes ago, j45nick said:

At the end of the day, all guitars are individuals, and we need to appreciate each for what it is, warts (if any) and all.

Though they don't hang on trees like apples and oranges, I have tried quite a lot the last ten years. 60's as new. They are highly different all  together - with this square-DNA running between them over 3-4-5 decades (late 60s, all 70s, 80s uncounted). If they were more or less individuals from birth, my (empirical as intuitive) conclusion/feeling is that they grow even further apart with age.  

And sure - most if not all guitars have a weaker side you either live with or pass on.  A good part of the game. 

jw3571 - did you really get the amber-wonder above. . ⁉️

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15 hours ago, jw3571 said:

I did end up buying it.  Should be here next week.

Terrific at least I now know where it is. We must talk about that guitar, , , and hear more of it. Can I begin already. .

One of the Qs I asked mister Ravita in my mail was about the strings he had on in the film. Do you happen to know ?

Congratulations

Edited by E-minor7
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On 4/18/2020 at 9:03 PM, jw3571 said:

I do not know what strings are on it, I'll see if it happens to have the box in the case.

Thanx - you see, it could be a way to compare my own to the one flying to you as we speak.  Would also be interested in seeing more pics.
The guitar had this very amberrish look in the film, but appeared more conventional faded cherry on their site. Both stunning. 

Well, all in all just very curious about this Bird. Hope  we'll be able to share your joy. 

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