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Guys,hope everyone’s safe during covid.

I have a specific question about finish cleaner.
I recently acquired a '71 Goldtop and accidentally spilled a drop of alcohol/oil contained liquid.
So stupid,I want to tear my hands off.
It made a track on the finish, not too deep, but surely has some deepness. Idiot.
Knowing,that alcohol destroys nitro,
My question is - did I completely ruin it and its going to stay there forever? (no refin suggestions on all original 71)) 
what to do? Can any cleaner handle that? Gibson Pump? Luthiers choice? GHS black bottle cleaner? Virtuoso Cleaner (I’ve read its the best)

IMG_0787 copy.jpg

IMG_0783 copy.jpg

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Do you mean the bit that's through to the wood or the long track "south" of it?

Refinishing that small area would cost a lot but there are experts out there who could do it.

However from what you say you'd rather keep it that way - it will be ok except that the finish will gradually chip away, especially the long bit where the finish has been damaged but not come off yet, and the bare wood area will get bigger and dirtier.  Looks like a knife cut from the pic.  You could investigate the possibility of a partial finish repair as there is also another smaller bare area nearer the bridge..

Remember that people pay a lot for Fender guitars like that!!

Edited by jdgm

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I mean long track,that cause by the single drop 

Yes,I like all the scuffs and gouges - Its natural relic and I'm not after "restoring it" to its super glassy look,but to make such a dumb damage (irreversible!!!) in the first week of having it ,I want to chop off both of my hands.

What do you think about (Out of curiosity) - hypothetically - the pro guys,who do restorations (cars/wood furniture),they have that instrument to polish surfaces - it does take out some portion of nitro,but if you ask the guy to do it very-very slightly ?... To dissolve the area a little bit,make it less visible; hypothetically speaking. 

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14 hours ago, alanwake said:

I mean long track,that cause by the single drop 

Yes,I like all the scuffs and gouges - Its natural relic and I'm not after "restoring it" to its super glassy look,but to make such a dumb damage (irreversible!!!) in the first week of having it ,I want to chop off both of my hands.

What do you think about (Out of curiosity) - hypothetically - the pro guys,who do restorations (cars/wood furniture),they have that instrument to polish surfaces - it does take out some portion of nitro,but if you ask the guy to do it very-very slightly ?... To dissolve the area a little bit,make it less visible; hypothetically speaking. 

 

Theoretically you could do it yourself, very carefully - I'm not sure what you would use - possibly one of the products you mentioned.   You couldn't use a motorised buffing tool, not delicate enough IMO.  You want to abrade the area around it very slightly in order to match in with the damaged bit.   It's certainly possible but....I personally wouldn't do it (am cack-handed at this stuff) for fear of making things worse.

Good luck either way!

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7 hours ago, jdgm said:

I personally wouldn't do it (am cack-handed at this stuff) for fear of making things worse.

Good luck either way!

Yes,I wouldnt do it either! It just a thought,that came to mind. I will ask pro luthier when i get a chance...Thanks anyway!

 

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