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Help ID vintage Gibson acoustic


midwestsierra
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Hi all -

About 20 years ago I pulled an acoustic guitar out of my dad’s closet. A friend purchased from a pawn shop and gifted to my father for his birthday. He never played it and it collected dust until I found it. I have never known exactly the model because the serial number was removed for some reason. It needs a little TLC, but is a super fun instrument. 


Can anyone help me ID the model and estimated year? 

Southern Jumbo late 60’s - late 70’s is my best guess. 
 

Thanks all!

 

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Southern Jumbo Natural(SJN) otherwise known as the CW (Country Western) from early 70's would be my guess. Best guess is 1969-1975 based on  serial number on back of headstock and made in USA stamp beneath it.

Grover rotomatic tuners are replacements.

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Might have been a 1969 or 70s Norlin transition era SJN with the volute and Made in America imprint.    My 1972 SJD in natural in my collection, bought new, has block inlays, not split parallelogram inlays like the 60s CWs and SJs.  And, that one.  Also, mine has a traditional 60s/70s SJ/CW pickguard that looks like the Dove’s without the bird.  Yet that guitar has a teardrop pickguard.  And, as you mentioned different original tuners.  I can’t clearly see the saddle, but it looks possibly like an ADJ wooden bridge.  That would make it a ‘69 I would think.    I suspect it’s a transition era SJN circa 69, but I can’t be sure.  
 

QM aka “ Jazzman” Jeff
 

 

Edited by QuestionMark
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Thanks Jeff! Great eye, and yes, it does have an adjustable wooden bridge. Is that feature unique to ‘69 models? Thank you for your help!

7 minutes ago, QuestionMark said:

Might have been a 1969 or 70s Norlin transition era SJN with the volute and Made in America imprint.    My 1972 SJD in natural in my collection, bought new, has block inlays, not split parallelogram inlays like the 60s CWs and SJs.  And, that one.  Also, mine has a traditional 60s/70s SJ/CW pickguard that looks like the Dove’s without the bird.  Yet that guitar has a teardrop pickguard.  And, as you mentioned different original tuners.  I can’t clearly see the saddle, but it looks possibly like an ADJ wooden bridge.  That would make it a ‘69 I would think.    I suspect it’s a transition era SJN circa 69, but I can’t be sure.  
 

QM aka “ Jazzman” Jeff
 

 

 

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1 hour ago, midwestsierra said:

Thanks Jeff! Great eye, and yes, it does have an adjustable wooden bridge. Is that feature unique to ‘69 models? Thank you for your help!

 

Adjustable bridges became available on Gibson sometime in the 50s, but became a lot more common, even standard in some models in the 60s,  I don’t recall ADJ bridges being on any 70s Gibsons, other than 69-70 when models were transitioning to Norlin  era Gibsons’ new models when Gibson was using up existing stock. Some 50s/60s ADJ bridges had ceramic saddles , some wooden saddles. They were quite controversial at the time and still are for some,   Some owners changed them out for standard bridges, some still swear by their sound.  In modern times Gibson reissues, the ADJ bridge resurfaced (I have a 1964 J-45 CS Reissue in my colkection with an ADJ bridge and saddle.  I like the sound!) Gibson changed out the ceramic or wooden saddles with less controversial tusq saddles on the modern day reissues.  Aftermarket bone saddle inserts for ADJ bridges also are now  available.  But, some still love the original ADJ bridge and saddle inserts.  Some not so much.  So, the controversy still goes on.

Beautiful guitar!

Enjoy the guitar!

 

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

 

 

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Dont forget the Deluxe at the end of SJ. As like the J45 Deluxe, J45/50 Deluxe.  That started in 1970. As well as the small guard and volute.  69 still had the large guard. Belly down bridge , But no volute. And a mohagany neck.  Not Maple.  
 

I just sold a 69   

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7 hours ago, zombywoof said:

Based on the teardrop pickguard I would guess 1970-1972.

 

This could well be a transition model from right around 1970. Can't tell what the neck wood is due to the very dark stain. Volute, for sure. I found photos of a (claimed to be) '69 burst SJ with the same  features except the pickguard was tortoise rather than black. By '71, I think the parallelogram inlays were gone,

Original tuners would have been individual closed-back Kluson-style, but could probably have been either metal or plastic keystones.

It's an unusual combination of features, but Gibson production was going through some pretty radical changes in that period.

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Looks like the neck heel is separating. It may need that looked at. Not unusual for guitars left in cases for a long time in a closet or under a bed with string tension to pull the neck loose . I would remove the strings for now. Should reach inside and see if any of the braces came loose or you can tap on the top and bottom while the strings are still on and listen for vibrating braces. If you plan on keeping it, I would get it checked out.

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2 hours ago, j45nick said:

 

This could well be a transition model from right around 1970. Can't tell what the neck wood is due to the very dark stain. Volute, for sure. I found photos of a (claimed to be) '69 burst SJ with the same  features except the pickguard was tortoise rather than black. By '71, I think the parallelogram inlays were gone,

Original tuners would have been individual closed-back Kluson-style, but could probably have been either metal or plastic keystones.

It's an unusual combination of features, but Gibson production was going through some pretty radical changes in that period.

Alot of these went to block inlays. And the went to those gibson embossed metal tuners.     The 69 I sold had the narrow nut.  I have a 67 SJ here the same way as well. But for that year only. The pick guard was like the 50s era with out the pointed tips 

Edited by slimt
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