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Hi, everyone

New member, first post. Just bought 29-year old J-200, after wanting one badly for 10 years since I first picked one up to play at GC.  Been playing on and off for 40+ years. Guitar looks fantastic, hardly a blemish and hasn't been played much. Had set up and sounds fantastic especially as compared to my other guitar,(a Larrivee D-03, nice but not in the same league). Anyhow, no checking, bu it has a very yellow almost gold tint to it, both binding and back and sides. Top has grown dark. My question - Is this normal with age? It seems I've seen maple furniture that was  more on the yellow side, or does it mean it was exposed to the sun too much? Does it affect value or performance in any way?

Thanks to all

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Gibsons are traditionally finished with nitrocellulose lacquer and will change color. Some more than others. The maple furniture you've seen may have been finished with some kind of lacquer as well, or it was more likely finished with oil varnish or polyurethane.  All finishes will react differently.

If it's 29 years old, that would make it a 1991, which may have been finished with a product called Fullerplast, which Gibson used for a while. Some people feel it was an inferior finish. That may be, but that is in direct conflict with many people's mindsets that Bozeman could do no wrong. 🙄

I'm being a smart alec now. I'll shut up.

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Thank you, ksdaddy. I've seen posts elsewhere about guitars from Bozeman during that time and most seem to think they are superior even for Bozeman. Me, I'm a bit ignorant on it and not much to compare it too. As long as it doesn't affect desirability I'm fine with it.

 

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The early Bozeman ones do have a following. I have one dated June 23, 1989 and it is a very good guitar. The sides and back are made from Sycamore (European Maple) that is very plain. That wood was left over from the Kalamazoo days. I also have a 2000 J-200, clearly "not" early Bozeman, and it is also a fine guitar, albeit with a different personality altogether. 

As to desirability, there will always be someone who claims the person who screwed the tuners on had a cold that week so those guitars are inferior.

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