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Roxx
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I bought my new Les Paul Modern Dec 30 2019. I have a great deal of hours shredding her and still have the same strings Gibson sent on guitar. I am completely happy with them and keep them cleaned and wiped down before putting her back in case.  I average 30 to 40 hours rocking out every week. Amazing that strings tese days stay in tune and good . Years ago ,like in the late 60s and early 70s, I changed quite often. I do lots of stretching and string english and they are holding up well. I don't plan on a change until strings start wearing flat at the frets. so far so good. I have several sets to replace them but am happy for now

 

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I hate the sound of new strings - but I'm talking only about acoustics....   I use  Elixir Long Life  strings and leave them on for a year or more.  To me, until they settle in - they get in the way of being able to hear what the guitar itself sounds like.  But - like I said, that's on acoustics - without pickups.   

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5 minutes ago, ghost_of_fl said:

I found pre-stressing the strings made them 'go flat' faster.   I do some very light pre-stressing and then put up with it slipping and retuning for a week.  

I love the sound of new strings, generally in retired life they last me about a month till they start sounding dead.

When performing I always replaced them before playing on what ever guitars I was using, usually no more than 3 guitars.

Edited by mihcmac
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20 hours ago, ghost_of_fl said:

New strings go out of tune when you bend notes.  I like 3 days old strings until they are about a month old.  Then I put up with the flat sound for at least another 2 months.  

I have Sperzel tuners. They don't wrap the strings around the pegs so there is none of that settling.

On my Parker I put the new strings on, tune them up, stretch them and retune a few times than put them in the case the night before my next gig. Then on the gig, I wiggle the whammy then tune up and they stay in tune all night. I do a lot of bending.

Part of that is the design of the guitar. Sperzel locking tuners, graph-tech nut and bridge, and almost a straight path from tuner to ball-end. My Parkers with a whammy stay in tune better than the guitars I've had that didn't have a whammy. Often they are still in tune for the next gig. That always amazes me.

And if put the P-Rails into the P90 position, the new strings sound so clear with such a great ping, I wish I could play new strings every gig. But I'm not wealthy and I'm an environmentalist.

Notes

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4 minutes ago, Notes_Norton said:

I have Sperzel tuners. They don't wrap the strings around the pegs so there is none of that settling.

I have an Ibanez with a Floyd Rose and it still drifts with new strings.  Seems like the tuners can't be the problem there (locking nut). 

Edited by ghost_of_fl
typo
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I don't think I got my message across very well. I was just reporting about the longevity of my original Gibson strings and how happy I was that they are still ringing out loud and clear after several hundred hours of playing. I don't gig with this guitar and only use to record with. I am curious as well as studying the life of the strings under heavy use. I don't have a whammy on my Les Paul but I do a lot of string bending.  I have several guitars and I do change strings as needed. I am experimenting and think it is unique to still be able to rock out with the original strings I got from the factory. If for any reason that they get worn and go tone dead whatsoever, I will put a new set on. I will of course use the Gibson electrics as they have proved as good as any other strings I have used in the past 50 years.

 

Edited by Roxx
spelling error corrected
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On 6/11/2020 at 11:21 AM, ghost_of_fl said:

I have an Ibanez with a Floyd Rose and it still drifts with new strings.  Seems like the tuners can't be the problem there (locking nut). 

The Sperzel tuners don't need a locking bridge or nut. Of course if you break a string the guitar goes out of tune.

The Sperzel tuners use about 3/4 of a wind around the post on the 6th string and a little more than one wind on the 1st string. A lot of string "stretching" happens here as the winds settle in under tension.

Add to that the design of the Parker guitar with no harsh angles in the string path and a nut and bridge that won't bind a string. Ken Parker did a great job in that aspect of improving a guitar.

But still, back to the original post, the strings won't last me a month, no matter what brand I get.

I live in a salt-air environment, close to the Atlantic Ocean in Florida so that might have something to do with it. I don't use Air Conditioning so if it's humid outside, it's humid inside. Plus during "the season" I have a once per week gig on a quay over a brackish water lagoon.

There's I consider string and reed changes as a cost of doing business.

Insights, incites, and typos by Notes

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Well put it this way.  With well worn-in strings, I can literally press the whammy bar all the way down until the strings are completely slack, bring the bar back up and they're still in tune.  If I do the same with brand new strings, they will drift.   

The reason that happens is because the cable wound around the center cable of the string needs to "settle" on the whole length of the string.  Has nothing to do with tuners/nut/saddles/bridge.   I am a little bit crazy about being exactly in tune so that doesn't help.  

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I like using Ernie Ball strings because they survive my string setting as I install them and because several of my guitars have tremolos. D'Addario strings, for me, seem break too easily and loose tone quickly.

I do pick hard, play hard and use very stiff small Dunlap Jazz III sharp point picks and love to trash my trem. I had good luck for a while using Rotosound and Nashville Straights but Ernie Ball has been consistently easier to find.

Edited by mihcmac
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5 minutes ago, mihcmac said:

I like using Ernie Ball strings because they survive my string setting as I install them and because several of my guitars have tremolos. D'Addario strings, for me, seem break too easily and loose tone quickly.

That's funny because I switched from Ernie Ball to D'Addario for the same reason. [confused]

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