Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

61 Bird. Brothers Music. For EM7


Salfromchatham
 Share

Recommended Posts

21 minutes ago, PatriotsBiker said:

 

I wonder why there's some strings or rubber bands wrapped around the tuners?

I'm just guessing here, but all the tuner buttons are lined up horizontally. Maybe it's to put a bit of tension on the posts to keep the buttons in that orientation, so the headstock sits flat on the headstock rest.

Really curious about what they are doing. I hope it is something as simple as a bridge re-glue. I would be really reluctant to go to a fixed bridge/saddle on a vintage 'bird in what appears to be remarkable condition, even though I am not normally a fan of the ADJ. It does seem right on a 'bird of this vintage, in this condition.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a matter of fact I played a fixed bridge 1963er a few  weeks ago - and held a lot of Bird between my hands. It was just as shiny as the one above and had the same degree of mint burst. I prefer them more faded though - and would never go for a non-original bridge/saddle. What finally convinced me about that was the 1965 ceramic saddled faded orange-cherry Southern Jumbo met last year. It was the best sounding old square I ever heard and would have stayed here if the width hadn't been 1 5/8.

Not hunting either - still investigating. My 63 ceramic saddled sunburst SJ is better than ever - especially after I sanded the unoriginal bridge-plate (which is thicker than Kalamazoo's) and evened out the hollow G-string nut groove (which had an unseen disturbing micro-bump). 

sox8NJb.jpg

Look how wonderfully wide the neck is. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, E-minor7 said:

My 63 ceramic saddled sunburst SJ is better than ever - especially after I sanded the unoriginal bridge-plate (which is thicker than Kalamazoo's). . .

 

A brazen move- how would one know when to stop? But it's something I'd been considering on one of the oldies that was at "a certain music shop" where they really didn't want to attempt to remove it's way-oversized bridge plate- either due to concerns about why it's big-ness was installed in the first place (structural?), or . . . they'd already had the guitar for almost a year, and simply wanted to put it in the "done" pile.

Has the '63 SJ accumulated some divoting at the 2nd fret (?)- hopefully, it doesn't fret sharp on you. Does look fine, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, 62burst said:

A brazen move- how would one know when to stop? But it's something I'd been considering on one of the oldies that was at "a certain music shop" where they really didn't want to attempt to remove it's way-oversized bridge plate- either due to concerns about why it's big-ness was installed in the first place (structural?), or . . . they'd already had the guitar for almost a year, and simply wanted to put it in the "done" pile.

Has the '63 SJ accumulated some divoting at the 2nd fret (?)- hopefully, it doesn't fret sharp on you. Does look fine, though.

 

Not sure the sanding was that bold when it comes  down to it. You eye-measure an original square sh. bridge-plate and compare it with the new - then go by intuition. I stopped after 65 strokes and strung up for a listen, , , then decided not to take it any further.  Yes, of course the surface gets uneven, but that doesn't matter - it's a question 'bout removing mass. 

There is divoting, , , and worn frets in the salvation-army-chord-area as well. The latter may generate some buzz, but the intonation is immaculate.  The main prob has been the (often mentioned) hollow G string, , , not much left of that now. I btw. is a believer in bridges and bridge-plates need for break in time. You don't just install a couple of vital new components on a 50 years old guitar and expect everything to swing . Wooden vibe takes time, , , but is worth the waiting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand that guitars from this period were not as strong as some other periods -- and some odd and unpopular practices were used.  Particularly if the time of the kerosene circuit (1930s) was the stand need for power.  If I use that standard for Gibsons, then even the Banners are too low power.  Basically you need 30s Jumbos, J-35s, Smecks, AJs, and J-55s for that.  But 1962 was a different era -- it really was acoustic, but not in-your-face power acoustics like bluegrass. 

Many of you know I have this 1962

rZLuPw1.jpg

That has the much hated plastic bridge -- often removed. But I was/am not temped to change it.  I could claim some high moral reason about history -- but that is not it at all.  To me, this guitar delivers that early 60s folk revival sound in spades.  And it is a great acoustic recording guitar -- maybe the best I have.  At least I use it the most.

I do also play -- and love -- bluegrass.  I play a lot more Gibson guitars there than most, and I have one of the best bluegrass guitars ever conceived.  1936

nGVdhgU.jpg

You don't drive a 747 to the drugstore or race a bicycle at Daytona.

Just my point of view.

Best to all,

-Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, tpbiii said:

 

Many of you know I have this 1962

rZLuPw1.jpg

That has the much hated plastic bridge -- often removed. But I was/am not temped to change it.  I could claim some high moral reason about history -- but that is not it at all.  To me, this guitar delivers that early 60s folk revival sound in spades.  And it is a great acoustic recording guitar -- maybe the best I have.  At least I use it the most.

 

The real special deal with your 62er is the rare plastic bridge / wooden insert combo. It means mellow with mellow on top and is bound to make this Bird sing in a league of its own. 
Glad you never changed it - the forest needs such voice too. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...