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J45 or J45RW


mjg

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I really like these J's. Out of the two, where do you feel each excels?

 

Also, I have a tenor voice and often play solo, singing and strumming mostly from aggressive to soft figure style.

 

I think either will work fine, but in a plugged in environment, which do you feel is better for vocal accompaniment?

 

Thanks!

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I find the mahogany guitars easier to sing with, but I almost always buy the rosewood because I like the richness in the bottom end.

 

The only way to know which is best for you is to use a portable recorder and try two songs with each. When you play it back, the choice should be obvious.

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I have been told that my Gibson AJ is the best guitar I have for playing with people singing. It is my only rosewood guitar. That said, I love the tone of the Hog J-45's best. My only mahogany guitar is my Cedar/Hog Taylor GS but it is used mostly for fingerstyle. Whenever I know someone is singing along, I usually bring my Gibson AJ.

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Whilst shopping a few years back, I played both the hog and rosewood J-45 and really felt the rosewood was better. I, too, do a lot of solo singing, but also with a few others. Just like the rich fullness of the rosewood - especially when using the short capo and fingerpicking. In the end I bought the SWD and not the J-45RW. Can't explain why exactly, the Songwriter just spoke to me. Good luck in your decision making.

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I find the mahogany guitars easier to sing with' date=' but I almost always buy the rosewood because I like the richness in the bottom end.

 

The only way to know which is best for you is to use a portable recorder and try two songs with each. When you play it back, the choice should be obvious.

 

[/quote']

 

Good idea on the recorder.

 

Thanks all!!!

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If it's your one and only guitar' date=' then J-45 mahogany, IMO. For an all round guitar, mahogany is better. [/quote'] Concur, totally. RW in that box size and scale may tend to muddiness. Nice clear pop with the hog.

 

As for singing, here's a thought. If you fingerpick, then your melody line is in the top end, so you would want that to ring clear. Ditto for flatpickers who note a lot on the top 3 strings. Cue off the bass? Rw, as a rule, makes a bigger note, but in this size box, the hog gives up a very mellow thump that should get the job done. If you cant test drive the Gibsons side by side, a Martin 00018/28 or a D18/28 would give you an idea of the difference. Re our slow response, the hog/rw conondrum has been discussed here before. Good luck.

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I can't compare the J-45 RW, but I really like my J-45 mahogany for vocal accompaniment. As always, individual guitars vary. I prefer the J-45 to my HD-28V (rosewood) for vocals, but then I also think my 1960 000-28 (rosewood) is outstanding for that purpose. The J-45, though, is sweet, powerful when needed, but not intrusive. I sometimes find that rosewood overtones get in the way of the vocal, which should be the focus when it is there. Hope that makes sense.

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I'm primarily a a solo singer/strummer. I recently went hunting for a J-45, briefly considered (and played) a rosewood, but tradition (a J-45 IS HOG!!!) and tone led me to a regular old standard mahogany. I love it - nice balanced tone, lots of dynamics, and none of the muddiness that my D-28 suffered from. Another thing to consider - rosewood guitars seem to need to be woken up, and also tend to get muddled in high humidity.

 

Enjoy the search!

 

Dan

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The J-45 in mahogany, thank you. I spent about a dozen years trying to sing with a fancy Taylor rosewood jumbo, a very nice sounding guitar - but the J-45 just WORKS, in ways the more expensive Taylor never did. I personally find it easier to sing with a guitar that emphasizes the fundamental tone, rather than the overtones.

 

Seriously, I think the traditional J-45 in mahogany is the ultimate singer-songwriter instrument. Period.

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I think either one will do a good job for you. I've yet to play a J-45 I'd want to buy. I'm sure others will feel different. My J-45RW is one of the nicest sounding Rosewood Dreads I've owned - rates right up there with the D-28 Marquis I used to own. It has a beautiful bottom end and crystalline trebles.

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  • 5 weeks later...

i'm a singer and a writer and started playing guitar a year ago and bought a martin rw dread. come to discover i have put my writing skills to work while learning guitar and have written over a dozen songs so far. I am jonezin for a hog j-45 to sing with. i feel, however, that the tones of the rw are an instrumental (no pun intended) component of the inspiration to write the songs i continue to write, and will be happy of the day when i can have both, the rw for writing and the hog j-45 to sing and record... good luck!

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I can appreciate why guys like RW--you get a lot of push in the bass/upper mids so it sounds Big. But at the end of the day, I dont hear what I want out of the top end. Big note but kind of cold (cowbell to hog chimes). Feel pretty much the same way re humbuckers vs single coils. A lot of songwriters have gotten good mileage out of hog slopes: J Taylor, Gillian Welch, Joe Ely, Lucinda Williams, Bobby Zimmerman, the Fabs...

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I think a lot of it is going to depend on your touch.

 

I love my RW, and mine is the old '03 with the ebony board/ebony bridge. I hit very hard, (when I do) and have no problem with the highs. 12's.

 

But, in the end, it's up to you.

 

Best of luck.

 

Murph.

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  • 3 weeks later...

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