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Introduction and a question


BuckFlicks
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Hello!  I've purchased my first Gibson and am awaiting its arrival.  It's the Studio Les Paul in Smokehouse.

I have watched a lot of demo and review videos, talked to local guitar sales guys, and was fairly certain what I wanted.  I love the sound of the pickups, I played the Tribute at a store and as far as I can tell, it's physically very similar to the Studio, other than the glossy finish, and everything felt good.  

I just watched the demo on the Gibson webstie  which said that when the push/pull knobs were activated, the humbuckers become P90s.  I haven't heard this in any of the other videos or from any guitar shop - is this true?  Is it possible?

Please refrain from condescending "Don't you know anything?" answers.  I'm new to guitar, and especially new to proper guitars like Gibsons.  I've done extensive research and this is the first I'd heard anything like that. I searched the forums and didn't see anything that resembled a reference to this.

Thanks in advance for your help!

 

BuckFlicks

 

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Hey  welcome to the forum and good luck on the purchase.  We like pictures so feel free to show us what she looks like. 

About the "humbuckers become P90s"

Usually coil switching will shut off/turn on one or both coils.  There's also push pull pots that change phasing, but neither of those would quite do what a P90 does. 

The physical aspects of humbuckers vs p0s are totally different however.  P90s, single coil with massive magnet, humbucker, two smaller magnets.  The size of the magnet and the physical structures of each pickup makes a difference.

The coil tap will definitely lighten up the tone when only one coil is active, but it wont have the same dynamics and overall tone that P90s do.   It's sort of the same kind of situation where people are trying to get a strat style sound out of a humbucker by using coil cuts.  It changes the sound, but it will never sound like a strat, same goes for the P90s.

OTOH, the coil switching does offer an extended array of available tones and sounds that you can coax out of it.   Just play around with it all a bit, and you'll quickly get the idea.

 

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This is what I figured... I have a guitar with P90s (Epi 339 Pro, which is currently my favorite guitar until the Les Paul arrives) and that's a big fat honkin' magnet and coil that I don't see sharing space with another in that PAF pickup cover.  And I have an Epi 339 that does have push/pull pots, so I'm familiar with the coil splitting/tapping concept.  Just got thrown for a loop with the claim that pulling the pot up makes it a P-90.  Made no sense. Ordinarily I would have discounted that claim as soon as it was said, but since it was on the Gibson website, I had to pause for a second.

Thanks everyone, for the welcome and the answers!  Looking forward to being a part of the community, and I will definitely post as soon as it arrives.

Buck

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Buck!

what ever that claim was, I don't think it was 100% accurate..   I'd have to see it I guess to understand a bit

Also the PRO series are great, I have a Sheraton, Like the stock Pro Bucker pickups.   A big step up overall for Epi with the PRO series.

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The pickups in the Studio are the 490R and 498T.  To the best of my knowledge, they're basically built like most other humbuckers with two standard single coils within.

Yes, I'm a fan of the Epi Pros.  My 339 P90 and Es-335 are both from the Pro line. 

Here is a link to the video - I tried to set it so the link starts right when he's talking about the pickups, but the whole video is less than 3 minutes if it doesn't start there.  He starts talking about the electronics at 1:35.

 Gibson TV video about the Studio Les Paul

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14 hours ago, IanHenry said:

Welcome to the forum BuckFlicks, and congratulations on the new  guitar, I hope you enjoy it.

Also you won't get  "Don't you know anything?" on this forum, everyone here will help you. 

That's what I was hoping for... it's just so rampant everywhere on the internet, any time I go to a discussion forum and read a question (no matter where it is) it seems like the first response is either "this has already been answered a dozen times here" or something suggesting that the original poster is the dumbest person on earth for not knowing the question - like the jerk who replied was born with all the knowledge. 

I am a member of a couple discussion groups that are nothing but helpful and courteous - I was hoping that since this site is an official Gibson site that that kind of jerk behavior isn't allowed or tolerated.

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The P-90 reference was just Mark Agnessi taking some poetic license with what he was saying.  I am not sure about his, but I think on a Studio the push/pull is a coil tap (not a split).  It will sound different (thinner) from the full on humbucker but not very much like a true P-90.

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11 hours ago, BuckFlicks said:

It's here, and it's fantastic.  Unfortunately, this website won't let me upload pictures that are larger than a postage stamp, apparently.

 

ha!  nope,,,..  people host them else where,   it's one thing I've found a facebook account is useful for actually.

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So... literally the ONLY complaint I have about this guitar is that the neck gets super sticky if I play it for longer than 15 minutes.  Which... is every time I play it.  Is this common in new Gibsons with nitro lacquered necks? Will it cure over time, or do I need to think about taking something abrasive to it?  And if it will cure over time, will it help if I leave it out of its case?  Is there anything I can apply to it in the meantime to slick it up?  I'm considering getting some thin cotton gloves and cutting the fingers off so my palm won't get moist and stick to the neck.

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Time should do it along with buffing with a clean cloth.

One of my Explorers was doing that and I finally hit it with lighter fluid on a clean paper towel and then buffed it with a clean cloth.  That guitar is a 2007 model but it spent most of it's life in a case.

That glove idea might not be a bad one as you'll be buffing it as you're playing it.

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