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PierreB

Early 2000’s j50....need expert opinions

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My absolute favourite age window for buying guitars is '89-2009. I DO have younger guitars (2015 SJ200, 2016 Maple AJ) but generally I prefer slightly older examples.

My reasoning is that they have been well played in, the woods have cured nicely, any potential problems will have made themselves evident (and been dealt with), they're significantly less expensive than new guitars AND vintage guitars, and don't generally have any of the structural issues that can raise their heads with vintage instruments.

I'd bet that the J50 you're looking at will be warm, woody and beautiful...if you have any way of keeping your J15 too, that would be an enviable pair of instruments with two distinct voices, but I understand how these things go. I've ended up having to sell a great deal of my guitars during lockdown to keep my rent paid and family fed...when I'm eventually in the market to buy another guitar though, the age window that you're looking at will be exactly the same for me!

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I have a 2001 J-50 that I got from Gruhn's in 2010.  I think the sound has opened up and aged well over the last 10 years.  I would consider these early 2000's versions more of a 1957-ish reissue with a fixed bridge, single rosette, and thin batwing pick guard.  Regarding prices, they have been stable, it seems like there are always nice ones in the mid-teens if you look around.  They've made plenty of the J-45/J-50 guitars (especially J-45) in the last 20 years so there is a large supply, I don't see them going way up in value.  

Others have commented on the chunky neck of this era, I would definitely not call mine chunky but it is possible they vary in girth.  

49309667528_bf812ed937_k.jpgIMG_1435 by vw1300, on Flickr

Charlie

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38 minutes ago, Jinder said:

My absolute favourite age window for buying guitars is '89-2009. I DO have younger guitars (2015 SJ200, 2016 Maple AJ) but generally I prefer slightly older examples.

My reasoning is that they have been well played in, the woods have cured nicely, any potential problems will have made themselves evident (and been dealt with), they're significantly less expensive than new guitars AND vintage guitars, and don't generally have any of the structural issues that can raise their heads with vintage instruments.

I'd bet that the J50 you're looking at will be warm, woody and beautiful...if you have any way of keeping your J15 too, that would be an enviable pair of instruments with two distinct voices, but I understand how these things go. I've ended up having to sell a great deal of my guitars during lockdown to keep my rent paid and family fed...when I'm eventually in the market to buy another guitar though, the age window that you're looking at will be exactly the same for me!

Thanks for the answer agree with all of what you said. Excited to try it out and compare tones with my j15 walnut burst.

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35 minutes ago, vw1300 said:

I have a 2001 J-50 that I got from Gruhn's in 2010.  I think the sound has opened up and aged well over the last 10 years.  I would consider these early 2000's versions more of a 1957-ish reissue with a fixed bridge, single rosette, and thin batwing pick guard.  Regarding prices, they have been stable, it seems like there are always nice ones in the mid-teens if you look around.  They've made plenty of the J-45/J-50 guitars (especially J-45) in the last 20 years so there is a large supply, I don't see them going way up in value.  

Others have commented on the chunky neck of this era, I would definitely not call mine chunky but it is possible they vary in girth.  

49309667528_bf812ed937_k.jpgIMG_1435 by vw1300, on Flickr

Charlie

Yes, the one I am looking at seems to have all the same feature as yours. Beautiful piece! And when you say mid teens thats in usd? Im in canada so. Thanks for the reply!

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Yes, US$.   By the way, I had originally wanted a J-45 because of the burst finish but got a really great deal on this J-50, now I like the natural top/red-brown pick guard as much as a sunburst.

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8 minutes ago, vw1300 said:

Yes, US$.   By the way, I had originally wanted a J-45 because of the burst finish but got a really great deal on this J-50, now I like the natural top/red-brown pick guard as much as a sunburst.

Definitely lots to love on both finishes!

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3 hours ago, Jinder said:

My absolute favourite age window for buying guitars is '89-2009. I DO have younger guitars (2015 SJ200, 2016 Maple AJ) but generally I prefer slightly older examples.

My reasoning is that they have been well played in, the woods have cured nicely, any potential problems will have made themselves evident (and been dealt with), they're significantly less expensive than new guitars AND vintage guitars, and don't generally have any of the structural issues that can raise their heads with vintage instruments.

I'd bet that the J50 you're looking at will be warm, woody and beautiful...if you have any way of keeping your J15 too, that would be an enviable pair of instruments with two distinct voices, but I understand how these things go. I've ended up having to sell a great deal of my guitars during lockdown to keep my rent paid and family fed...when I'm eventually in the market to buy another guitar though, the age window that you're looking at will be exactly the same for me!

I totally agree with that time period. Aged but, but still affordable.

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I bought a 2008 J-45 RW, gigging guitar! It was played out in a bar every night for a couple of years. Took me the better part of a day to clean the thing. It was dirty, smelled like a bar, but played like butter. Ended up replacing the loose fitting saddle. It’s now an incredible guitar.

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If you really want to know the measurement of your nut and bridge and neck profile, and a myriad other items, buy yourself a Vernier.....these days you can get a real cheapo digital model for not much.

I have an ancient history NON digital somewhere but I need a magnifying glass to read the numbers - the newer ones have a large digital readout! The StewMac one has a few extra guitar measuring tools!

So then next time you say you have a very chunky Gibson neck or a very skinny one, you could give a measurement!😎

I picked up a fairly expensive one recently at a hardware store and measuring guitar nuts and necks and bridge spacing is a bit of a revelation - what they give you on the guitar's spec sheet is...err...something they were 'aiming for'...

 

https://www.stewmac.com/luthier-tools-and-supplies/types-of-tools/calipers/luthiers-digital-caliper.html

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

 

 

 

Edited by BluesKing777

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22 hours ago, BluesKing777 said:

 

If you really want to know the measurement of your nut and bridge and neck profile, and a myriad other items, buy yourself a Vernier.....these days you can get a real cheapo digital model for not much.

I have an ancient history NON digital somewhere but I need a magnifying glass to read the numbers - the newer ones have a large digital readout! The StewMac one has a few extra guitar measuring tools!

So then next time you say you have a very chunky Gibson neck or a very skinny one, you could give a measurement!😎

I picked up a fairly expensive one recently at a hardware store and measuring guitar nuts and necks and bridge spacing is a bit of a revelation - what they give you on the guitar's spec sheet is...err...something they were 'aiming for'...

 

https://www.stewmac.com/luthier-tools-and-supplies/types-of-tools/calipers/luthiers-digital-caliper.html

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

Where are the usual places to measure the neck?  Width at the nut?  Thickness/depth at which frets?  I'm curious because others have commented on their "chunky" J-50 necks but mine does not feel chunky at all, but maybe it's just that my other guitars have super-chunky necks?

 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, vw1300 said:

 

 

Wildwood Guitars site show measurements for their acoustics...have a look at the Gibsons.

They give a measurement for the nut plus the neck at 1st fret and 9th, including the actual fret, strings off I believe....

In the Gibson section, I would put the (new guitars) ones with .82 at 1st fret in the slim category and ones with .91 in the chunky!

(we can measure away all we like but if no one else does, just says it is ‘chunky, don’t know the measure’....meaningless.

 

BluesKing777.

 

 

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Yes, congrats, indeed.  You've almost got a yin-yang thing going on there atop the bed. Get comfortable with the two and give us a report. As it was a concern, hopefully the neck profile is going to work for you.

And of course, you can always post a clip. . . or a comparo strum of the '50 and the Walnut. Enjoy your upcoming NGD weekend.

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Hi ,sorry for being late to the party ...i have a 1999 Gibson Acoustic brochure ...here`s what it says about the j 50 .

Classic 1960`s edition with 60`s pickguard. Equipped with transducer pickup .Antique Natural finish .

Specs ,24 three quarter  scale, Spruce top ,Hog back and sides ,Nickle white button tuners ,Antique Natural finish ,,Historic Belly Bridge,m.o.p dot fret markers ,m.o.p. Bridge dots ,,Rosewood fretboard and Bridge . 1 and 23/32 nut width .

 

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On 8/21/2020 at 6:55 PM, BluesKing777 said:

 

Wildwood Guitars site show measurements for their acoustics...have a look at the Gibsons.

They give a measurement for the nut plus the neck at 1st fret and 9th, including the actual fret, strings off I believe....

In the Gibson section, I would put the (new guitars) ones with .82 at 1st fret in the slim category and ones with .91 in the chunky!

(we can measure away all we like but if no one else does, just says it is ‘chunky, don’t know the measure’....meaningless.

 

BluesKing777.

 

 

I did order a cheap digital calipers to measure the neck on my 2001 J-50:

nut width = 1.72" = 1 23/32 inch

depth @ first fret = 0.82"

depth @ ninth fret = 0.88

I took these measurement with the strings on, then subtracted off the thickness of the 3rd string which was the thickest one the calipers touched.  For reference, here's Wildwood's specs on a new '60s J-45 (no standards listed in stock: 0.83", 0.96"

And a new G-45: 0.87", 0.92"

So I'm thinking my J-50 is a fairly slim neck.  

 

 

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