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sparquelito

How much of it is in the music?

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Nostalgia is a great word for that formative association I was attempting to describe in the OP, Jay. 
We can certainly be nostalgic for old music, just as we may be nostalgic for the good old days of 37 cent-per-gallon gasoline, Japanese motorcycles that blew blue smoke, and drive-in movies.

Good points also, merciful-evans.
I recall a lot of the music I heard on the radio in the 1960's and early 1970's being great, but then again there was a fair amount of schlock and nonsense, much of which doesn't hold up well 40 or 50 years later. 

Still, I can listen to some of albums that my parents left behind, and enjoy the nostalgic sentiments that go along  with the listening, whether I particularly like the music or not. 
Percy Faith, Charlie Pride, Dean Martin, Herb Alpert, Hank Williams, etc. 
Considering some of the shiit that my father put us kids through, and what an unsavory and even abusive reprobate he was, it's interesting that I don't harbor ill feelings toward those old records. I certainly haven't repressed the memories of first hearing them. 

I can vividly remember, at age four (this was around 1963) stealing a cold hit of beer off my dad's steel can of Falstaff, while hearing  Hank Sr sing about poor old Kaw Liga on the reel-to-reel. That beer tasted good. It was a good memory. 
Never mind the crimes that dear old dad later perpetrated on us. 

There's a fine line between nostalgia and the stuff of nightmares, I reckon. 

😐

Edited by sparquelito

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56 minutes ago, sparquelito said:

Nostalgia is a great word for that formative association I was attempting to describe in the OP, Jay. 
We can certainly be nostalgic for old music, just as we may be nostalgic for the good old days of 37 cent-per-gallon gasoline, Japanese motorcycles that blew blue smoke, and drive-in movies.

Good points also, merciful-evans.
I recall a lot of the music I heard on the radio in the 1960's and early 1970's being great, but then again there was a fair amount of schlock and nonsense, much of which doesn't hold up well 40 or 50 years later. 

Still, I can listen to some of albums that my parents left behind, and enjoy the nostalgic sentiments that go along  with the listening, whether I particularly like the music or not. 
Percy Faith, Charlie Pride, Dean Martin, Herb Alpert, Hank Williams, etc. 
Considering some of the shiit that my father put us kids through, and what an unsavory and even abusive reprobate he was, it's interesting that I don't harbor ill feelings toward those old records. I certainly haven't repressed the memories of first hearing them. 

I can vividly remember, at age four (this was around 1963) stealing a cold hit of beer off my dad's steel can of Falstaff, while hearing  Hank Sr sing about poor old Kaw Liga on the reel-to-reel. That beer tasted good. It was a good memory. 
Never mind the crimes that dear old dad later perpetrated on us. 

There's a fine line between nostalgia and the stuff of nightmares, I reckon. 

😐

 

Yes indeed. My dad had appalling musical taste (Mantovani & Mario Lanza). He hated my taste too. I recall him interrogating me over a Hendrix LP. Who was this person? Is he some malcontent? I'm sure it was because he was black. 

Mum was quite musical. She used to sing when I was very young. She had a good ear. We had no record player! I bought one when I was 15 and brought it into the house. Certainly not exactly a deprived childhood, but not an altogether happy one. Music is important. 

 

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Ditto here. I didn't care for some bands as a teen that I like now.  The Beatles is one example.  It was when they released their Sgt. Pepper's album in 1967 that I started liking them. 

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On 9/23/2020 at 12:10 PM, sparquelito said:

Nostalgia is a great word for that formative association I was attempting to describe in the OP, Jay. 
We can certainly be nostalgic for old music, just as we may be nostalgic for the good old days of 37 cent-per-gallon gasoline, Japanese motorcycles that blew blue smoke, and drive-in movies.

Good points also, merciful-evans.
I recall a lot of the music I heard on the radio in the 1960's and early 1970's being great, but then again there was a fair amount of schlock and nonsense, much of which doesn't hold up well 40 or 50 years later. 

Still, I can listen to some of albums that my parents left behind, and enjoy the nostalgic sentiments that go along  with the listening, whether I particularly like the music or not. 
Percy Faith, Charlie Pride, Dean Martin, Herb Alpert, Hank Williams, etc. 
Considering some of the shiit that my father put us kids through, and what an unsavory and even abusive reprobate he was, it's interesting that I don't harbor ill feelings toward those old records. I certainly haven't repressed the memories of first hearing them. 

I can vividly remember, at age four (this was around 1963) stealing a cold hit of beer off my dad's steel can of Falstaff, while hearing  Hank Sr sing about poor old Kaw Liga on the reel-to-reel. That beer tasted good. It was a good memory. 
Never mind the crimes that dear old dad later perpetrated on us. 

There's a fine line between nostalgia and the stuff of nightmares, I reckon. 

😐

Sorry to hear of your ordeal. I was blessed in that regard, so I make sure to tell them that all the time. 

No one should take good parents for granted. 

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AC/DC -- The Powerage  album is arguably the best thing they ever did.  Every song is well written and catchy, with exceptionally well written lyrics.  It was also the last album produced by  "Vanda and Young" who did an AMAZING job.  This is album is still a great listen.  Additionally, this  album separates itself significantly from the also-very-good  Let There Be Rock album, but which suffers from much more simple themes and lyrics as compared to Powerage.  As a very young (no pun intended) AC/DC listener at the time, I was actually very disappointed with the subsequent Highway To Hell  album as the songs were not nearly as good as Powerage  overall, and the all-new Mutt Lange production did not sound right to me (still doesn't).   I was lost as a fan just prior to Bon's death, and when he died, that sealed it for me.  

George Thorogood -- To me, I really only liked the VERY OLD Thorogood when him and the Destroyers were playing only covers and there was no sax in the band.  That was some killer, killer stuff.  His interpretations and guitar work on those old classic (but mostly new to his audience) tracks was nothing short of majestic.

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2 hours ago, 01GT eibach said:

AC/DC -- The Powerage  album is  the best.

George Thorogood -- To me, I really only liked the VERY OLD Thorogood when him and the Destroyers were playing only covers and there was no sax in the band.  That was some killer, killer stuff.  His interpretations and guitar work on those old classic (but mostly new to his audience) tracks was nothing short of majestic.

George made The Stolling Rones look silly in '81. 

Powerage is the AC/DC album.

...I'm going in to Sin City...

Edited by Sgt. Pepper

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