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Rosewood Board?


Murph

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see i'm 100% right call my wife

 

I could call her.

 

And tell her what a fine man you are.

 

She'd not get it.

 

She has a picture of you, in her mind.......

 

It's not pretty.

 

Sorry about your luck.

 

I'm married too.

 

Murph.

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I've got an '05 J-100 and haven't oiled it yet. Every now and then I think: next time I change the strings I'll oil the fretboard, but every time I change the strings I see that the fretboard is in great shape as it is, so I leave it alone.

 

If I *were* to oil it, I'd probably buy the Gibson product and go with that.

 

FWIW, here's Frank Ford's page on oiling the fretboard.

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I now only use Gibson fretboard oil but for many years I used 'Baby Oil' a product by Johnson & Johnson. The Baby Oil seemed to be good but I think that the Gibson oil is better. However I'm careful about not using too much. Probably like everyone else I apply the oil when I change the strings.

 

Over the last 2 or 3 years I bought an ES165 Herb Ellis and an SJ200EC. Both had dry rosewood fretboards although the ES165 was pretty bad. The SJ200 has come up really well after about 2 applications of the oil. I've oiled the Herb Ellis about 3 times in 12 months and its now looking better. The fretboard is remaining in good condition months after the application.

 

I even use the Gibson oil on ebony boards.

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I recently bought some Gibson Fret Board conditioner and some of their Luthier's Choice High Gloss Polish.

 

Interestingly enough, the conditioner smells exactly like lemon oil to me, despite warnings on this forum about how it could affect the finish - and the polish has the same scent as Martin guitar polish - and the same consistency.

 

I like both products just fine, but I would be comfortable reverting to lemon oil (which I used for 30 years without incident) if I couldn't find Gibson branded product.

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I have only oiled my Gibson Rosewood fretboard once and I used what Taylor recommends on their Ebony boards, "Boiled Linseed Oil". I choose Linseed Oil above on the poll but to be truly correct, it has to be "Boiled" linseed oil. You only need a very minor dab on a rag, wipe the board, let it sit a few minutes and wipe off the board with a dry cloth..(I use baby diapers as they are 100% cotton and after washing them a few times they are very nice and soft). A friend of mine also uses Boiled Linseed Oil to keep his gun stocks clean and they are beautiful!

 

In reality, fretboards don't need much cleaning unless your playing with muddy fingers, but once a year or every other year is good and you won't get build up from the oil that way.

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I would use Lemon Oil, as that is what I have on hand. The price is right. However, I've got Formby's, not O.E. Probably same stuff with a different lable.

 

While an interesting concept, I'm not sure you could get an African to stand still that long.

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Lemon Oil is good, I have heard murmurings about how this person used it and that happened etc, but I've been playing for 16yrs and have used lemon oil on pretty much every fretboard I've ever owned, with no problems whatsoever.

 

I only use it once every six months or so (and right away on any new guitar), maybe the people who had problems were using it every time they restrung, and were restringing every few days or something.

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I've not oiled my 2007 fretboard yet. Should I do it once a year? less' date=' more...?[/quote']

 

I've been told by more than one person (including on this Forum) that you shouldn't lemoil an ebony board anywhere near as much as a rosewood. I have done mine once in over a year.

 

Some will say never with lemoil. Taylor say use boiled linseed oil so that must be OK. Right?

 

I don't know who is right so proceed with caution on your SWD.

 

P.S. I know, I know. There is no verb to "lemoil"

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It's certainly an interesting topic. Rosewood is more open-grained than Ebony, so you'd assume it was a more absorbent and porous wood, therefore more prone to swelling as a result of oiling...although Ebony is the one that caution is advised for in lemon oiling.

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I've never put anything on my '03 J45RW's ebony board, or my '79 "The SG"'s ebony board. The ebony just looks fine to me with finger oils, and the Fingerease I use pretty regularly.

 

My daughters '08 Les Paul Studio just looks dry to me. Very open grained, I don't know how else to explain it, that's why I bought the Gibson Conditioner. I'm gonna treat it in a few days, then go ahead and do my '07 ES-339 for the first time too the next time I string it.

 

Murph.

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On this topic' date=' I would actually like to hear the opinion of someone I respect, and consider an experienced expert...

 

ksdaddy? Do you have an opinion on this?

 

...and before you say it, Crisco is not an acceptable answer.

 

[/quote']

That may be but, without a doubt, Crisco makes the best pastry. :-D

 

Btw, I use the Gibson stuff..... it smells divine!

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Murph's comment about the fretboard looking dry is the same reason I started to use fretboard oil and more recently Gibson oil. It does work but it may take more than one application before it seems to make an ongoing difference. Just an observation but some of the fretboards on brand new guitars in the stores can look really dry. Second hand guitars seem to be generally OK.

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It's certainly an interesting topic. Rosewood is more open-grained than Ebony' date=' so you'd assume it was a more absorbent and porous wood, therefore more prone to swelling as a result of oiling...although Ebony is the one that caution is advised for in lemon oiling.[/quote']

 

If you oil a rosewood board that is already properly hydrated, it won't swell - it will usually refuse to absorb the oil. Ebony should never be oiled, as I understand it, because the grain is so tight it won't absorb the oil anyway - you'll just make the strings dirty.

 

You may also find that oil will lift the dye or stain used on your ebony board that made it fully black in the first place. Long gone are the days when untreated ebony was black, even and clean.

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Ebony should never be oiled' date=' as I understand it, because the grain is so tight it won't absorb the oil anyway - you'll just make the strings dirty.[/quote']

 

I emailed Gibson about this issue after getting conflicting reports on this board and some stern warnings from some about not oiling the ebony fretboard...

 

According to Gibson, lemon oil is fine for the Ebony board, but not as frequently as on rosewood, maybe 1-2 times per year.

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