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Norlin Flashback - Iventory / Pricelist


E-minor7
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The old catalogs are a fine source of information- not only where each model stood in that year's lineup when pricing was given, but also for the nomenclature that Gibson used for the various features. The so-called "Fretless" Les Paul? Had to see what that was about. 

And the "new model" Gospel- how many of us would've ID'ed the guitar by it's headstock,  which was described as an inlaid  dove of peace?

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For me, the biggest curiosity of this well-pored over catalog listing is trying to figure out the  mystery of the numerous handwritten x's and ✔️'s, and the catalog's original owner trying to make the arithmetic work for what looks to be someone who seemed to want one of each.

(. . . and- I wonder if Miss Betty is still at that 643' phone number, and was that once a Nashville exchange?)

Edited by 62burst
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Interesting, indeed.  I still have my 73/74 Norlin SJN Deluxe to this day.  Little red faced about admitting to it, but I actually paid $400 for it brand new!   * 80/20ies required.

edit:  And thanks E-minor7 for the post.  

Edited by Hall
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2 hours ago, Hall said:

Interesting, indeed.  I still have my 73/74 Norlin SJN Deluxe to this day.  Little red faced about admitting to it, but I actually paid $400 for it brand new!   * 80/20ies required.

edit:  And thanks E-minor7 for the post.  

I still have my 1972 Natural SJD, bought new in 1974.  To my recollection I paid $150 plus I traded in my 1965 Epiphone Century (which I believe the music store treated as a $240 trade-in) for it.   You mention 80/20 strings.  Yep, that’s all I ever use on it, 80/20 bronze strings.  The guitar has a great mellow but full sound spectrum sound to it and it’s natural finish has developed a cool orange cast to it.  It’s been through the  repair mill over the years, but it still lives on.

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

Edited by QuestionMark
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22 hours ago, QuestionMark said:

I still have my 1972 Natural SJD, bought new in 1974.  To my recollection I paid $150 plus I traded in my 1965 Epiphone Century (which I believe the music store treated as a $240 trade-in) for it.   You mention 80/20 strings.  Yep, that’s all I ever use on it, 80/20 bronze strings.  The guitar has a great mellow but full sound spectrum sound to it and it’s natural finish has developed a cool orange cast to it.  It’s been through the  repair mill over the years, but it still lives on.

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

QuestionMark!  You did better dealing than me all those years ago provided you didn't miss that E. Century.    Mine has always sounded fine  with 80/20 strings regardless of the  Norlin bracing and bridge plate.  That's why I still have it!   Has developed the orange cast to the top also.  Nice with the black trim.  I've always loved the neck.  Good to know there exists another SJ from then that has made someone happy.

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9 hours ago, Hall said:

QuestionMark!  You did better dealing than me all those years ago provided you didn't miss that E. Century.    

Circa 1990 I started really missing that thin line 1965 Epiphone Century, so at that time I searched for one (pre-internet when searching really meant searching) and ended up getting, to take its place, a 1965 Gibson 125TC, the Gibson version of the same guitar as that 1965 E. Century, except with a cutaway and a short scale...just to have on hand.  It was then I also started adding more guitars into my collection, taking into new consideration that when trading a guitar away, it’s actually gone from the collection.  I think I’ve only let one or two guitars leave my collection since.  And, of course, the 1972 Gibson SJD still remains in my collection after serving me quite well for many years.

 

QM aka “ Jazzman” Jeff 

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Does anyone know what the difference was between the Blue Ridge and Heritage?  Both are described as "natural spruce top, solid book matched rosewood back and rims".  Also - can anyone comment on the J-55, which apparently had an arched back - was this like a Gospel but with a mahogany back/sides?  Did it sound better than the braced backs of the J45/J50 etc?   Just wondering.

I played a '72 SJ at Elderly a few years ago and liked it, so I do believe that Norlin let some good guitars escape the plant during the '70s

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3 hours ago, vw1300 said:

Does anyone know what the difference was between the Blue Ridge and Heritage?  Both are described as "natural spruce top, solid book matched rosewood back and rims".

 

I owned a very nice sounding early ‘70s Heritage.  The main differences I recall versus it’s early ‘70s Blue Ridge counterpart include the Heritage’s ebony fingerboard & bridge, along with it’s higher level of  bling (fingerboard & headstock inlays, mustache bridge, backstrip marquetry).

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In 1974 I was in the midst of my second folk music revival.  I was hanging around with folks like Jay Ungar, running up to the Town Crier Cafe to see Hazel Dickens or Roy Bookbinder (when he had Fats Kaplan with him), teaching music at a small arts center in Garrison's Landing, NY, and playing with an acoustic  blues band called Southern Can.   At the time I was gigging with, as best I can recall, a Gibson LG2 and a NYC-made Epiphone FT-110.   As music was actually earning me a living I figured I would treat myself to a somewhat newer guitar so went out looking.   With every Gibson I tried though it was crash and burn.  I eventually ended up with a big old blonde Guild F-30.

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