Jump to content
Gibson Brands Forums

Unsure of new acoustic.


Private joker
 Share

Recommended Posts

So I bought my first acoustic guitar the other day, it's a Gibson G-45 studio. I watched lots of videos, demos and comparisons. Then (perhaps foolishly) purchased one brand new off the web without trying it.   

I'm very pleased with the fit and finish on it. It's immaculate. Like the way the neck feels etc. However, I'm not too blown away with the way it sounds/plays. The action seems quite high (Bout 2.6mm/2.0mm at 12th) and around fret 10 or 12 it seems rather dead/flat. Slides barely make a sound and it seems a real effort to get get it sound good.

I guess I'm asking if new strings and setup is likely to turn it around or do I have a duffer? Having had no experience of acoustics. I suppose I could go to a shop and try a few others and make a more informed decision. Bit gutted at the moment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you have a return option?  
 

I’ve kept instruments that i questioned, thinking I’d get a setup, try different strings, pins, etc. and in the final analysis, I’d sell or trade it off because it never quite achieved what I had expected...improved some, but not enough.  There are too many great sounding ones out there to struggle with it.  If no return option, then take it to a good setup person and hope for the best.  
 

I’m sorry you’re experiencing this, as I’ve been there.  Of course, this is just one guys opinion after 55 years of buying, selling.

rb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most if not all guitars need to be set up when you buy it. How do  you expect the manufacturer to set up of every guitar to every buyers liking. Learn to do it yourself and its easy. I took a class on it and do my own  now.

As far as sound. Your on your own there. I do not understand why people post sound clips of guitars. Most people listen to sound clips on lap tops and home computer speakers that are not that hi fi.

When you mostly listen to music, is on a nice stereo with good speakers or a lap top with a 1 inch speaker? I do the first one.

Edited by Sgt. Pepper
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's really hard to know. I've looked at a couple off videos of that model that sound OK, but the thinner body could make a significant difference in the volume, balance, and projection of the guitar compared to a guitar like a J-45.

One thing I noticed is that the guitars in those videos have tall saddles, which may explain the high action on yours. A good setup could sort that out, and will also impact on the tone.

Another thing to consider is how things like ambient humidity and string age impact on tonal properties. In my experience, high humidity increases action height and makes the sound more muddy,, and low humidity does the opposite.

Chances are that the guitar needs a proper setup for your playing style, for starters. But it's hard to know if that will be enough to fix the things that concern you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, Private joker said:

So I bought my first acoustic guitar the other day, it's a Gibson G-45 studio. I watched lots of videos, demos and comparisons. Then (perhaps foolishly) purchased one brand new off the web without trying it.   

I'm very pleased with the fit and finish on it. It's immaculate. Like the way the neck feels etc. However, I'm not too blown away with the way it sounds/plays. The action seems quite high (Bout 2.6mm/2.0mm at 12th) and around fret 10 or 12 it seems rather dead/flat. Slides barely make a sound and it seems a real effort to get get it sound good.

I guess I'm asking if new strings and setup is likely to turn it around or do I have a duffer? Having had no experience of acoustics. I suppose I could go to a shop and try a few others and make a more informed decision. Bit gutted at the moment.

Take it back! You can have the action adjusted, but not the way it sounds. Get something you like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seems to be a bout of first guitar-itis going around.  This is only one of a number of posts I have run across in forums where newbies are convinced that first "good" acoustic  they chose is not up to snuff.  I am guessing it is because there is just too much information available out there.  Too many opinions, videos, sound bites, and what have you.   

I may be odd guy out but it offten takes me a bit to figure out how to pull the best out of a guitar it has to give.  As has been said, it takes a new guitar a while to figure out it is no longer  tree.  But it is not necessarily  the guitar but me as different guitars will respond differently to how you approach them.   I have played guitars where you would swear you heard angels singing when  approched with a light touch but "shimmered out" (as best I can describe it) when played aggresively.  It is all part of the learning process.  And if you are like me it has a very long curve.

 

 

Edited by zombywoof
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, new guitars typically need a setup.  A good setup can make a world of difference.  Sound is another issue.  What you think sounds good, I might not like it.  For me, if my guitar is easy and enjoyable to play and sounds to my ears like a guitar, then I’m likely good with it.  If it sounds like a sousaphone, I’ll be unhappy.....lol

Edited by MissouriPicker
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another vote for a good pro set-up. The question I would have is: What strings are you using?

Make sure they are mediums. I know some people here disagree, but I will posit that slope Gibsons need mediums to move the top adequately. They're built to handle mediums. Strings are a variable that is easy to experiment with. (My personal favorites, for now, are Martin Monel mediums.) 

Ultimately, though, the decision is yours. You don't want to be saddled with an acoustic you don't like.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Private joker said:

So I bought my first acoustic. . . 

Just shopping price? The G-45 Studio certainly is an affordable Gibson acoustic.

 Coming from an electric guitar? A solid body electric would most likely be an easier playing guitar, with lower action, but it is better to ship acoustics out a little high, and let the new owner dial in the action to their liking. But . . . 

1 hour ago, j45nick said:

... the thinner body could make a significant difference in the volume, balance, and projection of the guitar compared to a guitar like a J-45.

. . . yeah, you really have to want  the comfort of the shallower body depth on the G-45 Studio and be ok with it not having the low end of a standard Gibson body  depth guitar.

As far as projection goes, it might actually do that fairly well, as the sound is not going to be hanging out inside that guitar for too long.

Edited by 62burst
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, dhanners623 said:

Another vote for a good pro set-up. The question I would have is: What strings are you using?

Make sure they are mediums. I know some people here disagree, but I will posit that slope Gibsons need mediums to move the top adequately. They're built to handle mediums. Strings are a variable that is easy to experiment with. (My personal favorites, for now, are Martin Monel mediums.) 

Ultimately, though, the decision is yours. You don't want to be saddled with an acoustic you don't like.

I'll be honest, I am coming from an electric which I use 10s on. I have no idea what Gibson's stock strings are - I'm not overly keen on them though. Changing them may well make a difference. As might lowering the action.
I think I'll get myself down to the local Guitar shop in the next couple of days and try out some other acoustics and possibly another G-45 if I can. That might help me make a decision. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Private joker said:

I'll be honest, I am coming from an electric which I use 10s on. I have no idea what Gibson's stock strings are - I'm not overly keen on them though. Changing them may well make a difference. As might lowering the action.
I think I'll get myself down to the local Guitar shop in the next couple of days and try out some other acoustics and possibly another G-45 if I can. That might help me make a decision. 

Your new guitar, more than likely has 12’s.  I think it’s a good idea to go play some other guitars.  My local Luthier is a strictly electric guy. I took my Dreadnaught JR2 in for a basic setup. He fell in love with that little guitar. Said he had to have one. I was a little dumbfounded. I mean I like the guitar but,,,,,,,,,,,,,.

it has 13’s.

Edited by Paul14
Link to comment
Share on other sites

as said previously, you're likely playing a set ot lights (12 high E to 53 or 54 Low E)  That's usually what Gibsons and most acoustics will come strung with.

I'm going to post another recommendation for a setup too. 

Gibson does not spend a lot of time regulating nuts, or setting the action,  they want the consumer to do that.   They will intentionally have the setup moderately high so that the person who buys it, has room to bring it down to their liking. 

Once you take material off a saddle and a nut, which must be done to get the action set, you can't put it back on there.

Make sure the person who will do the set up it is prepared to deal with cutting the nut slots (which gibson happens to be notoriously bad at doing at the factory). 

Most stores don't have guys on site that have both the tools and the depth of know how for a completed setup.   (nut check, fret level check, adjust saddle for action and intonation etc)

It's worth the 50~60 bucks to have it done right the first time.  until you do that, you really don't know what you have there.

 

Edited by kidblast
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to my local guitar showroom yesterday and played a number of similar priced guitars. I’m afraid to say the difference was startling. EVERY single guitar played was in a different ballpark to my g-45. To a point where I think it might just be a duffer. It’s got to be. I’ve read Comments from loads of customer’s who were happy with G-45s out of the box. The one I have just isn’t playable. I’ve watched numerous comparisons of it vs Taylor’s, Martins etc where it compared favourably.  The one I have feels “squashy” and muted beyond the 10Th fret. The sad thing is I’d probably still prefer the g45 if I was convinced a setup would fix it. I like it’s sound (somewhere between Taylor and Martin) and I like it’s scaled back, basic, workman like but crafted aesthetic.  Unfortunately there are none in stock anywhere for me to try another example. So, it’s with a heavy heart I’m returning the g-45. It could be I just leave it for now, I played some really nice guitars but none of them leapt out at me sonically. 
 

 

Edited by Private joker
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/6/2020 at 9:57 AM, Private joker said:

The action seems quite high (Bout 2.6mm/2.0mm at 12th) 

 

Yeah, that action is really high IMHO. I lean towards 2.00mm/1.7mm, but everyone is different.

If the tone is a problem for you, then that IS a problem. Maybe get the set up and play it for a while to see how you are feeling about it? 

However, If you feel that the tone is something you cannot abide, then skip the set up and return it. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/6/2020 at 5:26 PM, dhanners623 said:

Another vote for a good pro set-up. The question I would have is: What strings are you using?

Make sure they are mediums. I know some people here disagree, but I will posit that slope Gibsons need mediums to move the top adequately. They're built to handle mediums. Strings are a variable that is easy to experiment with. (My personal favorites, for now, are Martin Monel mediums.) 

Ultimately, though, the decision is yours. You don't want to be saddled with an acoustic you don't like.

I've always been happy with my J-50, but it sounds loads better since I switched from light strings to mediums.

And if you happen to tune down, that is even more likely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

First of all I'd like to thank everyone who has replied.

So I've been away -returned my G-45 and played on quite a few guitars. I even owned a Taylor 214ce for 24 hours.
I think I still want a Gibson. The Taylor was very nice to play. Lovely action and lovely neck in general. It was just a bit.... soulless.  I don't know how else to describe it. Also - a bit expensive for a laminate guitar.
I played on Martins D12 and 13 (not bad - didn't love the sound), Faith were OK and I played a Sigma SJM-SG45+ which is an incredible guitar for the money. All solid wood  mahogany/spruce J45 copy. Ebony fretboard. When compared it with the Gibson j-45 slash (so nice) it wasn't miles off.  Really gave me food for thought.
My next question is - the G-45 Standard and the J-45 Studio, beyond aesthetics, is there much of a difference? I know the G45 Standard now comes with a rosewood fret board which if anything I would prefer. The J15 is probably out of my financial reach although there is an as new one second hand not a million miles away....
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know you have your heart set on a Gibson and when you find the right one, they’re amazing guitars.

Being on a budget, though (we’ve ALL been there...) I would urge you to check out a Farida. They sell them through Elderly.com and they make a slope that’s a great value for the money.

I have one of their OT-22s — Farida’s take on the Gibson LG-2 — and it has been nothing but impressive, especially for a $423 guitar.

This slope has all-solid woods: https://www.elderly.com/collections/farida-60-series-dreadnought-guitars/products/farida-old-town-series-ot-65-x-wide-vbs-acoustic-guitar-171

Not sure where you live (“duffer” makes me think Australia...) but see if there are any dealers near you.

If I didn’t already have a J-35, I’d probably snap up a Farida slope.

Edited by dhanners623
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...