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2001 J-200 Reissue?


Rowdy
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Hi, 

I'm hoping someone here can provide me with information regarding a J-200 I recently purchased in Australia. 

It was listed as a J-200 Standard, but the Vintage Tuners, Truss Rod Cover and four inlay Bridge suggested otherwise. 

I contacted Gibson and they confirmed that it is not a Standard, but is a "2001 J-200 Reissue". Unfortunately that is all the information they provided and they haven't replied to my follow up emails. 

Does anyone here know if there are any other differences other than the bridge, tuners and truss rod cover. Is this similar to the 1957 Reissues or New Vintage models (hide glue, etc)? 

Any further information would be appreciated. Thanks. 

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5 hours ago, Rowdy said:

I contacted Gibson and they confirmed that it is not a Standard, but is a "2001 J-200 Reissue". 

 

Per the 2001 catalog, your guitar was the basic, standard J-200 model in 2001 - but it's formal name was "SJ-200 Reissue".

The models comprising the "J-200 Super Jumbo Line" in 2001 were as follows >>> J-100 Xtra, J-150, SJ-200 Reissue, SJ-200 Elite Custom, and Western Classic SJ-200.

The descriptor for your model reads:  "Best-seller!  Historic 1950 details and the most popular jumbo, known as the 'King of the Flat-tops.'  Antique Natural or Vintage Sunburst Finish."

I would not directly compare this model to other Reissues or New Vintage models.  You cannot concretely expect to find specific features from other models in your instrument, even within the same decade.  

That said, one unique note in the 2001 spec sheet for your guitar is that the fingerboard & bridge are made out of Madagascar Rosewood.  And under Other Features, it lists "1950's SJ-200 Replica."  Your truss rod cover reflects the 1950's item.  The four-ribbon bridge is quite common for J-200 models (but two-ribbon bridges have also been utilized).  Gold Keystone tuners were standard on your model, and also appeared on the J-100 Xtra & J-150 in 2001.  I have a J-100 Xtra from 2000 (see avatar) with the same tuners, and they likewise were featured on jumbos for a number of years during that era of production.

Gibson's Montana facility built many fine quality instruments in the early 2000s.  Congrats on your new guitar & Enjoy!

Edited by bobouz
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I bought a2001 SJ-200 in 2001, bobouz is exactly spot on with this model. It was tauted as a 1950’s redo, even though it really wasn’t. Mine had no pickup, bone, nut & saddle. Was a great guitar. Hard times forced me to sell it. I bought a 2000 SJ-200  a couple of years ago, which is pretty much the same guitar except I don’t think it has Madagascar Rosewood. At least I don’t think it does? ( maybe it does, I really don’t know)

Edited by Paul14
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5 hours ago, bobouz said:

 

Per the 2001 catalog, your guitar was the basic, standard J-200 model in 2001 - but it's formal name was "SJ-200 Reissue".

The models comprising the "J-200 Super Jumbo Line" in 2001 were as follows >>> J-100 Xtra, J-150, SJ-200 Reissue, SJ-200 Elite Custom, and Western Classic SJ-200.

The descriptor for your model reads:  "Best-seller!  Historic 1950 details and the most popular jumbo, known as the 'King of the Flat-tops.'  Antique Natural or Vintage Sunburst Finish."

I would not directly compare this model to other Reissues or New Vintage models.  You cannot concretely expect to find specific features from other models in your instrument, even within the same decade.  

That said, one unique note in the 2001 spec sheet for your guitar is that the fingerboard & bridge are made out of Madagascar Rosewood.  And under Other Features, it lists "1950's SJ-200 Replica."  Your truss rod cover reflects the 1950's item.  The four-ribbon bridge is quite common for J-200 models (but two-ribbon bridges have also been utilized).  Gold Keystone tuners were standard on your model, and also appeared on the J-100 Xtra & J-150 in 2001.  I have a J-100 Xtra from 2000 (see avatar) with the same tuners, and they likewise were featured on jumbos for a number of years during that era of production.

Gibson's Montana facility built many fine quality instruments in the early 2000s.  Congrats on your new guitar & Enjoy!

Do you have the 2001 catalog? Is this something that can be seen on line?

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3 minutes ago, zombywoof said:

Too find catalogs on line  that recent you might try and check out the vintageaxe site.   But it is a subscription service.  It is actually easier to find a 1902 Gibson catalog online that one from the Bozeman years.

I just ordered one from eBay. It’s mostly electric stuff but does have a couple of pages on my J-200.  It was $13.00. Nothing on my 2001 J-50. The J-50 is pretty straight forward anyway I suppose. The J-200’s from that period are a little sketchy? Mine just says “SJ-200” & has an orange label. Vintage tuners, no pickup. It’s exactly like the 2001 J-200 that I bought new?

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6 hours ago, Paul14 said:

Do you have the 2001 catalog? Is this something that can be seen on line?

 

Paul - Yes, I do have the 2001 catalog, along with the 1999 & 2003 catalogs.  During that stretch, Gibson put out an acoustic catalog every other year.  I went through a number of Gibsons within those years, keeping the ‘00 J-100 Xtra and a superb sounding ‘02 J-45 Rosewood.  Other models purchased new included a J-150, J-50, and two WM-45s (satin & gloss).

The specs on your J-200 from 2000 are identical to the 2001 version.  Therefore, it should have a Madagascar rosewood board & bridge.  Also, a pickup was not standard on this model, as you noted with the 2001 you’d previously owned.

Specs for the 2001 J-50 are very typical of the breed, with the addition of a standard Fishman UST.  This was the same model year J-50 I owned, and while I did love the tone, the neck profile on that particular instrument was a bit too chunky for me.  That glitch finally got corrected with a very satisfying 2015 J-50!

Again, starting with a major lineup revision in 1999 in conjunction with a stronger focus on traditional models, I think Ren & Bozeman entered a pleasingly noteworthy period of production during the early 2000s.  These instruments on the used market are always worth a serious look, imho.

 

Edited by bobouz
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hNT6fWY.jpgXIApdVq.jpgCEqqmA5.jpggyN5VOn.jpgabRGxR8.jpgyNAJaSR.jpgThanks for all the replies. That was the kind of information I was hoping to get, very helpful. 

It is a beautiful guitar. I managed to upload some photos after watching some YouTube videos (I'm new to this!). 

It does have a pick up. I'm not sure what it is, but it is just a 9V direct out with no controls on the guitar. I bought it off the widow of the previous owner, who was a guitarist in an Australian country music star's band. She seemed to think it was some kind of LR Baggs pick up? 

Once again, thanks for helping me out everyone. 

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1 hour ago, bobouz said:

 

Paul - Yes, I do have the 2001 catalog, along with the 1999 & 2003 catalogs.  During that stretch, Gibson put out an acoustic catalog every other year.  I went through a number of Gibsons within those years, keeping the ‘00 J-100 Xtra and a superb sounding ‘02 J-45 Rosewood.  Other models purchased new included a J-150, J-50, and two WM-45s (satin & gloss).

The specs on your J-200 from 2000 are identical to the 2001 version.  Therefore, it should have a Madagascar rosewood board & bridge.  Also, a pickup was not standard on this model, as you noted with the 2001 you’d previously owned.

Specs for the 2001 J-50 are very typical of the breed, with the addition of a standard Fishman UST.  This was the same model year J-50 I owned, and while I did love the tone, the neck profile on that particular instrument was a bit too chunky for me.  That glitch finally got corrected with a very satisfying 2015 J-50!

Again, starting with a major lineup revision in 1999 in conjunction with a stronger focus on traditional models, I think Ren & Bozeman entered a pleasingly noteworthy period of production during the early 2000s.  These instruments on the used market are always worth a serious look, imho.

 

Thanks for that. I appreciate it. Is the the catalog that you have. I ordered one of these earlier today.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gibson-Guitar-Catalogue-2000-Paperback/133598217301?_trksid=p2485497.m4902.l9144

 

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6 minutes ago, Rowdy said:

hNT6fWY.jpgXIApdVq.jpgCEqqmA5.jpggyN5VOn.jpgabRGxR8.jpgyNAJaSR.jpgThanks for all the replies. That was the kind of information I was hoping to get, very helpful. 

It is a beautiful guitar. I managed to upload some photos after watching some YouTube videos (I'm new to this!). 

It does have a pick up. I'm not sure what it is, but it is just a 9V direct out with no controls on the guitar. I bought it off the widow of the previous owner, who was a guitarist in an Australian country music star's band. She seemed to think it was some kind of LR Baggs pick up? 

Once again, thanks for helping me out everyone. 

Mine looks just like that. Natural finish & all.  The only difference is, mine doesn’t have a pickup. Wonder if the pickup was added?

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19 minutes ago, Paul14 said:

Is the the catalog that you have. I ordered one of these earlier today.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gibson-Guitar-Catalogue-2000-Paperback/133598217301?_trksid=p2485497.m4902.l9144

 

That looks like a nice one, Paul!  It’s different from what I have, which is strictly for the Montana lineup.  I also have a separate Nashville catalog.

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1 hour ago, Paul14 said:Wonder if the pickup was added?

 

The most likely probability is that the pickup was a later addition.  The non-cutaway models with a pickup as standard equipment all utilized the same Fishman UST, and a two-pronge metal clip on the neckblock for the 9V battery.  Also re Rowdy’s beautiful guitar, the pickguard design wearing off was fairly common at that time.  Seemed like all you had to do was breath on it & away it went!

Edited by bobouz
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49 minutes ago, bobouz said:

 

The most likely probability is that the pickup was a later addition.  The non-cutaway models with a pickup as standard equipment all utilized the same Fishman UST, and a two-pronge metal clip on the neckblock for the 9V battery.  Also re Rowdy’s beautiful guitar, the pickguard design wearing off was fairly common at that time.  Seemed like all you had to do was breath on it & away it went!

Also at the time, if you were an original owner, if you contacted them, they would  send you 1 replacement pick guard free of charge. Of course it was just like the one that the flowers fell off of in the 1st place. I still use the free pick guard as a book marker for “ the fabulous Gibson book.” 

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1 hour ago, 62burst said:

Thanks for the pics- the '200 looks great. And there's someone around here who will have some truss rod cover envy ; ).

I got a nice new one to replace the rough looking one that came with the guitar - just put it on 2 days ago when I did the very 1st string change.

go6WCOLm.jpg

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4 hours ago, Paul14 said:

Mine looks just like that. Natural finish & all.  The only difference is, mine doesn’t have a pickup. Wonder if the pickup was added?

I'm not sure, but I think the pickup is factory. It doesn't appear to be aftermarket and I've seen a couple of around that vintage on reverb with what appears to be the same pickup system. 

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4 hours ago, bobouz said:

 

The most likely probability is that the pickup was a later addition.  The non-cutaway models with a pickup as standard equipment all utilized the same Fishman UST, and a two-pronge metal clip on the neckblock for the 9V battery.  Also re Rowdy’s beautiful guitar, the pickguard design wearing off was fairly common at that time.  Seemed like all you had to do was breath on it & away it went!

5Nhas06.jpgHere is a pic of the Pickup battery holder It is the two prong metal clip on the neck block you describe. I know LR Baggs use the little bag that affixes with Velcro. It's wired directly to the pickup and end pin jack plug. Would that mean it's the Fishman UST you mentioned? 

According to the seller, it was her late husbands guitar. He was in Lee Kernaghan's band (a well known Australian Country Artist). She said he bought it new from Corner Music in Nashville. 

She also had his Guild D55 but wasn't prepared to part with that one. 

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2 hours ago, Rowdy said:

5Nhas06.jpgHere is a pic of the Pickup battery holder It is the two prong metal clip on the neck block you describe. I know LR Baggs use the little bag that affixes with Velcro. It's wired directly to the pickup and end pin jack plug. Would that mean it's the Fishman UST you mentioned? 

According to the seller, it was her late husbands guitar. He was in Lee Kernaghan's band (a well known Australian Country Artist). She said he bought it new from Corner Music in Nashville. 

She also had his Guild D55 but wasn't prepared to part with that one. 

 

It does look like the battery holder Gibson used for many years.  It’s certainly possible that it could have been special ordered from the factory, or perhaps an aftermarket addition.  But the use of that holder does not immediately verify the use any particular pickup or system, and a working musician could easily have had any system of his preference installed.

That said, I always like to consider probabilities, and because of this instrument’s year of manufacture, it would not be a surprise to find that era’s typical Fishman UST under the saddle.

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1 hour ago, bobouz said:

 

It does look like the battery holder Gibson used for many years.  It’s certainly possible that it could have been special ordered from the factory, or perhaps an aftermarket addition.  But the use of that holder does not immediately verify the use any particular pickup or system, and a working musician could easily have had any system of his preference installed.

That said, I always like to consider probabilities, and because of this instrument’s year of manufacture, it would not be a surprise to find that era’s typical Fishman UST under the saddle.

Thanks, I'll get hold of an inspection mirror and have a look inside when I get a chance. 

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  • 3 months later...
On 12/22/2020 at 6:40 PM, bobouz said:

 

It does look like the battery holder Gibson used for many years.  It’s certainly possible that it could have been special ordered from the factory, or perhaps an aftermarket addition.  But the use of that holder does not immediately verify the use any particular pickup or system, and a working musician could easily have had any system of his preference installed.

That said, I always like to consider probabilities, and because of this instrument’s year of manufacture, it would not be a surprise to find that era’s typical Fishman UST under the saddle.

Hi Bobouz, 

I can confirm that it is a Fishman Matrix Acoustic Natural 1 UST. 

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