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'32 Nick Lucas


CJB
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In my not remotely humble opinion, there are no guitars better than early Nick Lucases. I prefer the 12-fret versions, and love my 1929 Nick But this is a lovely example.

And here's some ragged playing on my quite ragged 1929 Nick:

 

Edited by jt
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@jt I've heard the same from multiple sources.   Hopefully one of these days I'll get to check one out. But honestly, I'm happy just looking at those pictures.  Nice to see a well preserved example of fine early Gibson artistry.  

Edited by CJB
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1 hour ago, j45nick said:

This is a case where I would go for a modern re-issue with vintage specs. Madagascar rosewood in place of Brazilian would be a reasonable trade-off.

OOH man!  Wouldn't that be cool?

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Hey guys, that one’s mine.  It has a very modern feeling neck.   Maybe JT can confirm but I believe all the 13 fret NL’s had floating bridges.  That’s what John Arnold told me.  Anyway, this guitar may be my all one favorite but arthritis is limiting my play so I’m selling all my high end stuff.  

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11 hours ago, pcf said:

Hey guys, that one’s mine.  It has a very modern feeling neck.   Maybe JT can confirm but I believe all the 13 fret NL’s had floating bridges.  That’s what John Arnold told me.  Anyway, this guitar may be my all one favorite but arthritis is limiting my play so I’m selling all my high end stuff.  

It is a gorgeous guitar.

Interesting that it has wood internal side stays, rather than the fabric ones Gibson seemed to use on some other models in the 1930s. Tom Barnwell's 1943 FON 910 rosewood banner SJ has similar wooden stays. 

I've always thought the side stays were there to mitigate cracking. Maybe Gibson thought rosewood was more vulnerable to this than mahogany.

In the late 1940's, Gibson seems to have dropped the fabric side stay and gone to wooden ones, as seen in your NL. Both of my 1950 J-45s have wooden side stays.

Modern Gibsons, other than historic re-issues like the Legend series, generally have no internal side stays. This does save a bit of weight, if the guitar rims are the same thickness with or without stays.

I have no vintage Martins for comparison, but there are those here who have 1930s Martins and Gibson  who might offer comments on this particular construction detail.

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On 2/2/2021 at 9:23 PM, pcf said:

Hey guys, that one’s mine.  It has a very modern feeling neck.   Maybe JT can confirm but I believe all the 13 fret NL’s had floating bridges.  That’s what John Arnold told me.  Anyway, this guitar may be my all one favorite but arthritis is limiting my play so I’m selling all my high end stuff.  

Yes, as best I know, all of the 13 fretters had floating bridges.

Good luck with the sale!

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22 hours ago, j45nick said:

It is a gorgeous guitar.

Interesting that it has wood internal side stays, rather than the fabric ones Gibson seemed to use on some other models in the 1930s. Tom Barnwell's 1943 FON 910 rosewood banner SJ has similar wooden stays. 

I've always thought the side stays were there to mitigate cracking. Maybe Gibson thought rosewood was more vulnerable to this than mahogany.

In the late 1940's, Gibson seems to have dropped the fabric side stay and gone to wooden ones, as seen in your NL. Both of my 1950 J-45s have wooden side stays.

Modern Gibsons, other than historic re-issues like the Legend series, generally have no internal side stays. This does save a bit of weight, if the guitar rims are the same thickness with or without stays.

I have no vintage Martins for comparison, but there are those here who have 1930s Martins and Gibson  who might offer comments on this particular construction detail.

My 1929 Nick also has the wood side reinforcement strips. As you point out, Gibson seemed to jump from wood to cloth and back again from the 1920s through the 1950s.

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Given the price tags originals carry these days, I agree going the repro route.  The one that jumps out in my mind is  the Fairbanks F20  Nick Lucas.  I have seen them with a maple and mahogany body but am not sure he has offered one with a rosewood body.   Still about as dead bang accurate as you are going to find in a modern take on an NL.

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