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The Electric Guitar, a history


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2 hours ago, jaxson50 said:

IMO we all stand on the shoulders of those who came along before us,  Country and Western,  Swing, Big Band, Jazz in its many forms, Blues, Alt, and Rock and Roll are all forms of popular music,  nobody I know plays music without being inspired by some other musicians.  Just when one may think the music is stagnant,  a new artist comes along with a new take, and soon they are old news. 

We can remember things and other things not. I can't remember or how to pronounce that Joe's name who plays the Blues. I'm always calling him Joe Bonanza or Joe Monomasa to my wife. She laughs and tells me his name every time and I can't even pronounce it.  I'm like that guy on Petes Dragon who can't pronounce that town. I'd like to learn Slow Blues this year though. 

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Please excuse me but T-Bone isn't playing guitar on this track.   A gentleman called Frank Pasley is playing some fine steel guitar.   Here is T-Bone really laying down the blues in his signature styl

Well, on the other hand... I like history I like guitars History+Guitars  for me, what's not to like? so yea,, I'm in,  even if I seen it before,  Like Stooges shorts with not

I dunno, I think it'd be pretty cool to play something like that for a half hour.  I'm not sure I can put a $ to what I'd pay,  certainly have to be a reasonable ask, $10k, to play Jimi's strat f

3 hours ago, mihcmac said:

Johnny B Goode was one early guitar song that I couldn't get out of my head then a little later Tobacco Road going into the early 60's, not to forget Peter Gunn and Pipeline. These were all early electric guitar songs that stood out for some reason. Comparing the early 60's to the late 60's extreme evolution took place, it was the era of electrics I think. Introducing the first power trios, some times with an additional vocalist, for the first time 3 instruments could produce enough sound for permanent ear damage.

I love Johnny B Goode, Still remember the days watching Chuck Berry play it live. Pipeline, I have to include it every time I get a guitar out. First I check the tuning on the guitar and then I run through Pipeline to see how it sounds. Or House Of The Rising Sun and many times both songs.  

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3 hours ago, jaxson50 said:

Geez, I can't remember my name if I don't get mail once a week,  trivial crap is all I hang onto!

Don't get me going on American history though,  if you think I'm a pain in the butt now, 

I married a teacher, I get corrected all the time. I think the only reason she stays married to me is because I make her laugh each day and many times a day at times.  When we first got married, she told me I wasn't allowed to attend teacher parties as I would embarrass with the way I talked. Not using proper words. Like, "Deb, I ain't got no reason to say so." Haha.  So she's done a lot of work on me and I've done a lot of work on her as well.  

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Eddie Durham was a musical genius,, it's a shame his name isn't as well known as so many others including Charlie Christian or Robert Johnson, 

For one thing, Eddie was a tinkerer,  by 1929 he had already built his own electric guitar, and made his own pickups! He played in, and arranged for, the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra in the 1930s; recorded with the Kansas City Five and Six, featuring Lester Young and Jo Jones; composed and arranged most of the material for the Count Basie Orchestra; arranged In the mood for Glenn Miller. 

He was a composer of extraordinary ability,  this recording is from 1935, four years before Charlie Christian was hired by Goodman and was recorded.  Eddie never drank, never smoked and never cussed,  not the typical image of a jazz man of that era.

 

 

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Here's a thought for you to ponder;

What one thing is manufactured by the thousands each day, all over the world, with certain knowledge that most consumers will acquire it, barely learn to play it, allow it to collect dust, and then later sell it or give it away?

The electric guitar, naturally. 

A mind-boggling notion, truly. 
But for us guitar lovers and guitar collectors, it's a comforting thought. 

🙂



 

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8 hours ago, jaxson50 said:

Eddie Durham was a musical genius,, it's a shame his name isn't as well known as so many others including Charlie Christian or Robert Johnson, 

For one thing, Eddie was a tinkerer,  by 1929 he had already built his own electric guitar, and made his own pickups! He played in, and arranged for, the Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra in the 1930s; recorded with the Kansas City Five and Six, featuring Lester Young and Jo Jones; composed and arranged most of the material for the Count Basie Orchestra; arranged In the mood for Glenn Miller. 

He was a composer of extraordinary ability,  this recording is from 1935, four years before Charlie Christian was hired by Goodman and was recorded.  Eddie never drank, never smoked and never cussed,  not the typical image of a jazz man of that era.

 

 

Enjoyed that Jax. Thanks.

Its an important point that electric guitar seemed inevitable. There had already been 2 unsuccessful attempts before Electro String. Les Paul and many others had tried using phonograph styli & phone receivers on guitar bodies. It seems Eddie 'made' his own resonator guitar using a pie pan before getting a National, and used a megaphone for live guitar amplification. 

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Along with Durham, let's not also forget another pioneer in the use of the electric guitar, and a man who influenced many others, like Chuck Berry, B.B. King and beyond. (I don't think Robert Johnson belongs in an electric guitar discussion. )  

I give you---- T-Bone Walker.  [biggrin]

Whitefang

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19 hours ago, mihcmac said:

Johnny B Goode was one early guitar song that I couldn't get out of my head then a little later Tobacco Road going into the early 60's, not to forget Peter Gunn and Pipeline. These were all early electric guitar songs that stood out for some reason. Comparing the early 60's to the late 60's extreme evolution took place, it was the era of electrics I think. Introducing the first power trios, some times with an additional vocalist, for the first time 3 instruments could produce enough sound for permanent ear damage.

Sorry, but originally, TOBACCO ROAD wasn't an electric guitar tune .  The song's writer, John D. Loudermilk was playing acoustically  on the original 1960 recording, which, thanks to an older step sister, is when I first heard the song..  [wink]  Since then the tune has been covered over 200 times.  Legend has it The Jackson 5 recorded it for an audition tape, but nobody can provide said tape for proof.  But, here originally----

Incidentally, the first riff I learned to play was DUANE EDDY'S electric guitar riff from "Rebel Rouser".

Whitefang

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2 hours ago, Whitefang said:

Sorry, but originally, TOBACCO ROAD wasn't an electric guitar tune .  The song's writer, John D. Loudermilk was playing acoustically  on the original 1960 recording, which, thanks to an older step sister, is when I first heard the song..  [wink]  Since then the tune has been covered over 200 times.  Legend has it The Jackson 5 recorded it for an audition tape, but nobody can provide said tape for proof.  But, here originally----

Whitefang

The Loudermilk version seems to to be the one most familial to me, but so many electric versions  that came later probably clouded my brain. One in particular was the Spooky Tooth version.

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6 hours ago, Whitefang said:

Along with Durham, let's not also forget another pioneer in the use of the electric guitar, and a man who influenced many others, like Chuck Berry, B.B. King and beyond. (I don't think Robert Johnson belongs in an electric guitar discussion. )  

I give you---- T-Bone Walker.  [biggrin]

Whitefang

Please excuse me but T-Bone isn't playing guitar on this track.   A gentleman called Frank Pasley is playing some fine steel guitar.   Here is T-Bone really laying down the blues in his signature style on "Mean Old World" -

 

Fun fact: T-Bone Walker and Charlie Christian knew each other. Both took guitar lessons from the same teacher at one point - a guy called Chuck Richardson in Oklahoma City.

Christian's solo on "Swing To Bop" (it's actually a tune called 'Topsy', partly written by Eddie Durham) is IMO at least 5 of the original 10 commandments of electric jazz guitar. 

Here it is - every guitarist should hear thisRecorded on a mono wire recorder and here it replays in B so probably a semitone higher and a bit faster than it actually was.  Three and a half minutes of incredibly hip guitar playing:

 

Edited by jdgm
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1 hour ago, jdgm said:

Christian's solo on "Swing To Bop" (it's actually a tune called 'Topsy') is IMO at least 5 of the original 10 commandments of electric jazz guitar.   

Here it is - every guitarist should hear thisRecorded on a mono wire recorder and here it replays in B so probably a semitone higher and a bit faster than it actually was.  Three and a half minutes of incredibly hip guitar playing:

 

That was great! 

Thanks for posting that jdgm! 

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2 hours ago, jdgm said:

Please excuse me but T-Bone isn't playing guitar on this track.   A gentleman called Frank Pasley is playing some fine steel guitar.   Here is T-Bone really laying down the blues in his signature style on "Mean Old World" -

 

Fun fact: T-Bone Walker and Charlie Christian knew each other. Both took guitar lessons from the same teacher at one point - a guy called Chuck Richardson in Oklahoma City.

Christian's solo on "Swing To Bop" (it's actually a tune called 'Topsy', partly written by Eddie Durham) is IMO at least 5 of the original 10 commandments of electric jazz guitar. 

Here it is - every guitarist should hear thisRecorded on a mono wire recorder and here it replays in B so probably a semitone higher and a bit faster than it actually was.  Three and a half minutes of incredibly hip guitar playing:

 

That's a classic!  Charlie Christian  was no doubt a phenomenal player,  aren't we lucky he was hired by Goodman,. Goodman  was the first ( as far as I have been able to find) white artist to hire African American players, Lionel Hampton and Christian.  I honestly believe we would never have heard either artist if they were delegated to play in black bands, . Goodman brought jazz and blues to the white audience,  where others just stole ideas from them,  Benny showcased them.

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Yes, thanks JDGM for posting that. Deb & I went to an Old black blues player's concert a few years back. Thought it was Buddy Guy?  Rings a bell anyway. He was very good. He had a young guy open for him. 

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17 hours ago, jdgm said:

Please excuse me but T-Bone isn't playing guitar on this track.   A gentleman called Frank Pasley is playing some fine steel guitar.   

 

Thanks.  I did not know that.  But here's a clip of T-Bone playing in that unusual  style of his.  I once tried holding my guitar in that fashion and got nowhere with it.  [wink]   And he's doing one of my favorite blues tunes from way back.

Whitefang

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