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Albert  was a great showman, as witnessed in this video, hard to envision him playing a high school prom, but, yeah, he did!

He used F sharp tuning with a capo at 5, 6, or 7th fret, the sax player is Jon Smith,  Collins jams with Roy Buchanan are legendary,  both left us too soon.

Thanks for posting this video,  it brought back memories,  

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15 hours ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

That song is the bomb. 

Really?  People are still saying that kind of crap?  [confused]  Anyway----

Collins is an old favorite, and I was pleasantly surprised when my wife dragged me to see some "teen flick" called ADVENTURES IN BABYSITTING and this scene came on!  [flapper]

https://youtu.be/552PLnE61TM

Whitefang

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I guess cause I just did. Are you not allowed to say bomb on a forum? When I lived in San Jose every Friday at 3pm or 5pm a radio station out of SF called KFOG 104.5 on your FM dial would play that and The Toyes - Smoke Two Joints.

E. Shue is very easy on the eyes. How does Albert play with the strap like that?

Edited by Sgt. Pepper
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57 minutes ago, Retired said:

Very talented players and having fun doing it.  Those are the concerts I love attending.  Although, I never got to see them play. 

That's for sure!  Albert was the headliner but he shared the spotlight with his band members,. He must have been a blast to work with.

Listen to this Ike and Tina Turner record,  The Hunter,  Albert is playing lead on the album, 

 

Edited by jaxson50
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10 minutes ago, jaxson50 said:

That's for sure!  Albert was the headliner but he shared the spotlight with his band members,. He must have been a blast to work with.

Listen to this Ike and Tina Turner record,  The Hunter,  Albert is playing lead on the album, 

 

Ike & Tina Turner,  I watched them as a kid, Loved watching her sing and shake it about. Yeah they were great. 

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Even after becoming well known in the music business Albert had to work  construction  to support his family,  he worked  on Neil Diamond's house! His wife finally insisted he go back into music full time, by then he was 39,  the lost years,  

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One of my buddies worked with a guy who had Albert Collins as a neighbor.  I don't know his name, I'll call him Ed.

Albert had the same motorhome as Ed and Albert was always coming over trying to buy parts off of Ed's motorhome.  

It finally got to the point where it was oh no, here comes Albert...

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23 hours ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

I guess cause I just did. Are you not allowed to say bomb on a forum?

Don't mind me.  I have this thing about dumb slang.  Like "My bad", which sounds like baby talk to me.  And I suppose "the bomb" isn't as bad or dumb as using "phat", which you can't see how it's spelled when you hear it.    I think of the poor, slow witted young man who, when his girl asks him how she looks in her new outfit forgets himself and says, "Oh, baby... you sure look "phat" !"    And as you can't see how it's spelled when you hear it, all she hears is he thinks she looks fat.  And any young man who tells his girl she looks fat is gonna get it.  Or worse, he won't!  [wink]

Back to Albert-----

Shortly after groovin' to the newly discovered BEATLES,  my stepsister treated me to THIS........

I SAID he was a long time favorite!  [wink]

Whitefang

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45 minutes ago, Whitefang said:

Don't mind me.  I have this thing about dumb slang.  Like "My bad", which sounds like baby talk to me.  And I suppose "the bomb" isn't as bad or dumb as using "phat", which you can't see how it's spelled when you hear it.    I think of the poor, slow witted young man who, when his girl asks him how she looks in her new outfit forgets himself and says, "Oh, baby... you sure look "phat" !"    And as you can't see how it's spelled when you hear it, all she hears is he thinks she looks fat.  And any young man who tells his girl she looks fat is gonna get it.  Or worse, he won't!  [wink]

Back to Albert-----

Shortly after groovin' to the newly discovered BEATLES,  my stepsister treated me to THIS........

I SAID he was a long time favorite!  [wink]

Whitefang

Great recording,  I am a long time fan of Albert too.  He never got his due, Blues was and remains a hard sell for air play ,. 

But it is a fact that both Vaughn brothers attributed their love of blues to a few players, and Albert was high on their lists.  Those Texas pickers stick together. 

 

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23 hours ago, jaxson50 said:

  Those Texas pickers stick together. 

 

If that were true, Johnny would have been in that mix.  [wink]   Blues a "hard sell"?  Sure.  Last few decades maybe.  Remember, in the mid to late '60's blues became real big among the white kids(hippies).   But from then on it's been pickers( like we here in forums like this) that's been keeping the faith.  And any specialty programs on college and public radio stations.  I've loved the blues since I was about six or so and knew too it never was always about the guitar.  Since my Mom was a huge Woody Herman fan, Me and my brother grew up often hearing this tune on the "phonograph"  [wink]  Some of those "licorice stick" runs would sound good on guitar.

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About blues getting radio air play; when I was a little kid (in the mid '50s), I remember hearing Jimmy Reed on the radio fairly often (and I don't remember much of anybody else from back then.)  At the time, I didn't know who it was and pretty much forgot about that music.  In high school, I "discovered" the blues and got into BB King and John Lee Hooker among others.  My best friend found a Jimmy Reed LP and played it for me.  It all came back to me the moment I heard the first track.  "I remember that guy!"  I don't know how old I was when I first heard him, but something about his music and his sound just made a lasting impression on me even though it sort of lay dormant until my high school years.

I still listen to him.

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20 minutes ago, Whitefang said:

If that were true, Johnny would have been in that mix.  [wink]   Blues a "hard sell"?  Sure.  Last few decades maybe.  Remember, in the mid to late '60's blues became real big among the white kids(hippies).   But from then on it's been pickers( like we here in forums like this) that's been keeping the faith.  And any specialty programs on college and public radio stations.  I've loved the blues since I was about six or so and knew too it never was always about the guitar.  Since my Mom was a huge Woody Herman fan, Me and my brother grew up often hearing this tune on the "phonograph"  [wink]  Some of those "licorice stick" runs would sound good on guitar.

Whitefang

Of course, there should have been 20 or 30 Texas pickers on stage for the 1989 Presidential inauguration ball, maybe Jonny was a Democrat,  or perhaps he was touring. 

And yes, I remember well the Blues resurgence of the 60s,  it was good for the old blues guys till about 1964. After that they were relegated to touring college campuses,  while young white players took the spotlight.  Only a few blues players ever made bank.  BB King, and try to name the others. 

Taj Mahal doesn't count as he was not an "old blues guy " he was in his early twenties .  Buddy Guy was the young guy in the Chicago blues scene then, the young gun. 

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6 minutes ago, jaxson50 said:

...  Only a few blues players ever made bank....

Yeah, I saw Albert King at the King Biscuit Blues Festival in '90.  He was kind of surly and *****ed at his band occasionally, but he still was impressive.  He said he was retiring soon and did retire.  But, then I heard he had to go back touring and performing because he needed the money.

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22 minutes ago, Mr. Natural said:

Yeah, I saw Albert King at the King Biscuit Blues Festival in '90.  He was kind of surly and *****ed at his band occasionally, but he still was impressive.  He said he was retiring soon and did retire.  But, then I heard he had to go back touring and performing because he needed the money.

Funny you mention Albert King,  the first rock concert I attended was  Iron Butterfly,  with Albert King as the first act, he burned the place down! That would have been 1966 or 67,  I had been to other rock shows where there were several bands but they each did two or three songs before the next band was up,  

Howling Wolf did petty good for himself with the Blues resurgence of the 60s,  the Stones took him on tour but the music scene was so different then,  you made your money from record sales and royalties from radio air time back then.   We think of the biggest act of the 60s,  The Beatles,  the most they ever made from a live show was 25k each, and that was on their last tour,  just three years later Jimi Hendrix was demanding and getting 175k per show just for his cut.  In McCartney's  book he writes that he became a millionaire in 1965, and they were doing two to three shows a day, plus radio interviews and tv shows and two movies . 

When I saw Mance Lipscomb with Big Mama Thorton in 1969, the tickets were $3.50.  Same as for Steve Miller with Box Skags,  that same year I saw Blind Faith on their only US tour, I paid $6.50  for good seats.  

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I'm a big Wolf fan.  He was still working until his auto accident and subsequent death in '75 or '76.  Sonny Boy Williamson (the second) recorded with the Animals and the Yardbirds in the '60s.  But all of these guys, including Albert King (and with the possible exceptions of Muddy Waters and John Lee Hooker) saw their time pretty much over by the end of the '60s.  BB King was a little more radio-friendly and younger; he lasted longer.  I'm a big BB fan, too.  I saw him in Vegas in the '70s and in Dallas in the early '90s.

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3 hours ago, Mr. Natural said:

I'm a big Wolf fan.  He was still working until his auto accident and subsequent death in '75 or '76.  Sonny Boy Williamson (the second) recorded with the Animals and the Yardbirds in the '60s.  But all of these guys, including Albert King (and with the possible exceptions of Muddy Waters and John Lee Hooker) saw their time pretty much over by the end of the '60s.  BB King was a little more radio-friendly and younger; he lasted longer.  I'm a big BB fan, too.  I saw him in Vegas in the '70s and in Dallas in the early '90s.

We were really lucky to have had  the chance to see those gentlemen,  Skip James is another great, Buddy Guy and Albert Collins were six years apart in age, they were the young guys in the 1950s and 60s,  Brownie McGhee was a great blues player too,  he and Sonny Terry were two great piedmont blues men, the lineage is fun to follow, Brownie McGhee was was a student of Blind Boy Fuller, born in 1904, Brownie,  born in 1915 was a mentor  and teacher to Happy Traum , born in 1938, he  along with his brother Artie were collaborating with the likes of Bob Dylan  and Phil Ochs in Greenwich village in the early 60s,  the thread binds it all up together,  

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13 hours ago, Whitefang said:

If that were true, Johnny would have been in that mix.  [wink]   Blues a "hard sell"?  Sure.  Last few decades maybe.  Remember, in the mid to late '60's blues became real big among the white kids(hippies).   But from then on it's been pickers( like we here in forums like this) that's been keeping the faith.  And any specialty programs on college and public radio stations.  I've loved the blues since I was about six or so and knew too it never was always about the guitar.  Since my Mom was a huge Woody Herman fan, Me and my brother grew up often hearing this tune on the "phonograph"  [wink]  Some of those "licorice stick" runs would sound good on guitar.

Whitefang

Woody Herman , yeah, that's the Blues! Thanks for posting that,  it ties in with our other discussionon the history of the electric guitar , your point is right on the money,  the early guitar players were copying clarinet solos and of course using their own expressions, Woody was just beyond cool. 

Count Basie a d Duke Ellington could get down with the Blues to, and they always had the best musicians playing with them., 

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