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Tascosa
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If you are tuned to open C, then strumming  unfretted at the 0 fret position equates to a C chord.  If you then barre all of the strings (using, say your second or ring finger)at the 05th fret, then you’re playing an F chord.  If you barre all of the strings at the 07th fret, you are playing a G chord.  
 

Barring all off the strings at the 02nd fret is an D chord and at the 04th fret is an E chord.  Barring at the 09th fret is an A chord and barring at the 11th fret is a B chord.  Barring at the 12th fret is a C chord, again.

Keep in mind, you can also not barre all 6 strings, but only barre the 1-4 strings, provided you do not hit the 05th and 06th strings when strumming...and the non-zero position  chords will all work.  And, of course a slide put on the 03rd or 04th finger will also work to barre and slide into the chords...to play slide.  

You could also retune to open G or open D (or open E) and all this will also work, although the chords you will be hitting will need renaming in accordance with the scale, depending how no the open position you tune to.   In open C, the barred fifth  fret is F.  In open G, the barred 05th fret is C, etc. etc.

Look up how to tune to open tunings in the internet.  They do not necessarily equate to just tuning to a standard tuning chord.  For example an open tuning G, tunes the first string to a D note, not a G note like a standard tuning chord.   (There are also variations, for example, when I play in open G tuning, I actually tune to G sustain not a regular open tuning G, so it’s more like five sting banjo tuning.  But, if you’re just starting exploring open tunings, I don’t want to confuse you...so excuse this sidetracking.)

The thing to remember in open tunings is you can also hit individual notes up and down the neck, rather than always barre chords.  For example, hitting minor chord sounds can be accomplished for by hitting a note or two notes instead of barring in a major key.  Slide tip:   If you put a slide on your fourth finger,  you can fret notes with your second or third finger when you are not barring with the slide on the fourth finger.  But, that’s only if you’re interested in slide playing in open tuning.

Hope this is helpful.   Open tuning is a whole other new world of guitar playing to explore and work on.

 

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

Edited by QuestionMark
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4 hours ago, Tascosa said:

If you tune to open c how are regular chords found. I have lost tip of index finger and can not play a c chord right. 

Look at the stuff Keith does in Open G. He doesn't even have the 6th string on his guitar anymore when in that tuning.

Richards received this guitar from Eric Clapton on his twenty-seventh birthday in December 1970 and first used it to record Exile on Main Street, in 1971. During the session for that recording, Richards removed the low E string and tuned the five-string guitar in an open G chord (GDGBD), a technique that became part of his signature sound. He went on to use the guitar for most of his songs in open tunings. In the 1980s, Richards named the instrument “Micawber” after a character from Charles Dickens’s David Copperfield.

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1 hour ago, QuestionMark said:

If you are tuned to open C, then strumming  unfretted at the 0 fret position equates to a C chord.  If you then barre all of the strings (using, say your second or ring finger)at the 05th fret, then you’re playing an F chord.  If you barre all of the strings at the 07th fret, you are playing a G chord.  
 

Barring all off the strings at the 02nd fret is an D chord and at the 04th fret is an E chord.  Barring at the 09th fret is an A chord and barring at the 11th fret is a B chord.  Barring at the 12th fret is a C chord, again.

Keep in mind, you can also not barre all 6 strings, but only barre the 1-4 strings, provided you do not hit the 05th and 06th strings when strumming...and the non-zero position  chords will all work.  And, of course a slide put on the 03rd or 04th finger will also work to barre and slide into the chords...to play slide.  

You could also retune to open G or open D (or open E) and all this will also work, although the chords you will be hitting will need renaming in accordance with the scale, depending how no the open position you tune to.   In open C, the barred fifth  fret is F.  In open G, the barred 05th fret is C, etc. etc.

Look up how to tune to open tunings in the internet.  They do not necessarily equate to just tuning to a standard tuning chord.  For example an open tuning G, tunes the first string to a D note, not a G note like a standard tuning chord.   (There are also variations, for example, when I play in open G tuning, I actually tune to G sustain not a regular open tuning G, so it’s more like five sting banjo tuning.  But, if you’re just starting exploring open tunings, I don’t want to confuse you...so excuse this sidetracking.)

The thing to remember in open tunings is you can also hit individual notes up and down the neck, rather than always barre chords.  For example, hitting minor chord sounds can be accomplished for by hitting a note or two notes instead of barring in a major key.  Slide tip:   If you put a slide on your fourth finger,  you can fret notes with your second or third finger when you are not barring with the slide on the fourth finger.  But, that’s only if you’re interested in slide playing in open tuning.

Hope this is helpful.   Open tuning is a whole other new world of guitar playing to explore and work on.

 

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

Thanks, You are very informative with your answers

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One thing I like about open G is you tune 3 strings down and 3 stay the same, so your strings have no chance of breaking. You may want to tweak the truss rod a tad if it gets buzzy.

Here is the open G tuning from low to high. D-G-B-D-G-B-D

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19 hours ago, Sgt. Pepper said:

One thing I like about open G is you tune 3 strings down and 3 stay the same, so your strings have no chance of breaking. You may want to tweak the truss rod a tad if it gets buzzy.

Here is the open G tuning from low to high. D-G-B-D-G-B-D

Youve 7 strings there dude

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